Nic Weishar

Irish A-to-Z: Nic Weishar

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One of fall camp’s biggest surprises, tight end Nic Weishar has taken off his redshirt and is intent on making up for lost time. In a position battle that lacks a returning starter (or anybody with any significant experience), Weishar is making sure that the coaching staff sees him as a viable option to contribute, especially in the pass game.

A year after coming on campus looking more like a basketball player than somebody on the football team, Weishar still lacks some of the heft you’d want from a starting tight end. But he has made great strides in Paul Longo’s weight room, and it’s opened up opportunities for Weishar to make an impact in a crowded group of offensive skill players.

 

NIC WEISHAR
6’4″, 241 lbs.
Sophomore, No. 82, TE

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

A first-team All-State player in Illinois, Weishar was a U.S. Army All-American and a four-star prospect. He had offers from Iowa, Michigan, Ohio State and Oklahoma though picked Notre Dame early in the process.

Kelly called him “the finest pass catching tight end we saw” on Signing Day.

 

PLAYING CAREER

Freshman Season (2014): Did not see action.

 

WHAT WE SAID LAST YEAR

Pretty much exactly what happen.

I don’t see Weishar getting into a game this year. It just doesn’t make sense as long as Koyack, Durham Smythe, Mike Heuerman and Tyler Luatua all stay healthy. A year off will give Weishar a chance to get to know Paul Longo and his staff.

It’ll also give the Irish coaching staff an opportunity to balance their roster. With Smythe, Heuerman and Luatua all locks to play, holding Weishar back makes it easier to manage the roster, especially trying to keep the tight end recruiting even moving forward.

There’s a bright future ahead for Weishar. But it isn’t likely to happen in 2014.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

At this point, it’s hard not to adjust your expectations upwards after hearing early reports on Weishar’s game. While I don’t think he’s the athletic freak that Kyle Rudolph or Tyler Eifert were, Weishar certainly has a knack for catching the football, and even if he isn’t 6-foot-5, a 240-pounder who knows how to use his 6-foot-4 frame certainly isn’t an easy cover.

Finding his way onto the field is the biggest challenge in 2015, especially if he isn’t overly capable as a blocker. As the Irish look for ways to get all of their wide receiving talent onto the field, it looks like Scott Booker’s got a guy who also needs to get into the rotation.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

This might not sound like high praise, but I think we need to set modest expectations for Weishar this season. To that point, I think 10 to 15 catches sounds about right, though the sophomore can feel free to blow right past that number if he feels like it.

Weishar’s been a handful during camp, reportedly dominating the second-team defense and linebackers in coverage. As Durham Smythe and Alize Jones have been limited in camp, it’s allowed Weishar to take some first-team reps as well.

The red zone could be the X factor for Weishar, and will obviously be one of the keys to the Irish offense. While you’d expect the Irish to lean heavily on the running game near the goal line, Weishar is one of many great pass options to consider, as long as the staff has faith in the decision-making skills of Malik Zaire.

 

THE 2015 IRISH A-to-Z
Josh Adams, RB
Josh Barajas, OLB
Nicky Baratti, S
Alex Bars, OL
Asmar Bilal, OLB
Hunter Bivin, OL
Grant Blankenship, DE
Jonathan Bonner, DE
Miles Boykin, WR
Justin Brent, WR
Greg Bryant, RB
Devin Butler, CB
Jimmy Byrne, OL
Daniel Cage, DL
Amir Carlisle, RB
Nick Coleman, DB
Te’von Coney, LB
Shaun Crawford, DB
Scott Daly, LS
Sheldon Day, DL
Michael Deeb, LB
Micah Dew-Treadway, DL
Steve Elmer, RG
Matthias Farley, DB
Nicco Fertitta, DB
Tarean Folston, RB
Will Fuller, WR
Jarrett Grace, LB
Jalen Guyton, WR
Mark Harrell, OL
Jay Hayes, DL
Mike Heuerman, TE
Kolin Hill, DE
Tristen Hoge, C
Corey Holmes, WR
Chase Hounshell, TE
Torii Hunter, Jr. WR
Alizé Jones, TE
Jarron Jones, DL
DeShone Kizer, QB
Tyler Luatua, TE
Cole Luke, CB
Nick Martin, C
Greer Martini, LB
Jacob Matuska, DL
Mike McGlinchey, OT
Colin McGovern, OL
Peter Mokwuah, DL
John Montelus, OL
Nyles Morgan, LB
Sam Mustipher, OL
Quenton Nelson, OL
Tyler Newsome, P
Romeo Okwara, DE
James Onwualu, LB
C.J. Prosise, WR/RB
Doug Randolph, LB/DE
Max Redfield, S
Corey Robinson, WR
Trevor Ruhland, OL
CJ Sanders, WR
Joe Schmidt, LB
Avery Sebastian, S
Elijah Shumate, S
Jaylon Smith, LB
Durham Smythe, TE
Equanimeous St. Brown, WR
Ronnie Stanley, LT
Elijah Taylor, DL
Brandon Tiassum, DL
Jerry Tillery, DL
Drue Tranquill, S
Andrew Trumbetti, DE
John Turner, S
Nick Watkins, CB

Irish A-to-Z: Nick Watkins

South Bend Tribune / Robert Franklin
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After a freshman season swimming in the proverbial deep end, cornerback Nick Watkins enters his sophomore season with a better understanding of Brian VanGorder’s defense. And he better. Because with KeiVarae Russell and Cole Luke in front of him, Watkins’ path to the field is just as tough as it was in 2014.

The talented Texas native has never been short of physical gifts. And with a depth chart infused by competitive freshmen like Shaun Crawford and Nick Coleman, Watkins may have passed veteran Devin Butler in the depth chart, but faces challengers at every level in a secondary that must be better than last year’s edition.

Let’s take a look at what Watkins can bring to the Irish this season.

 

NICK WATKINS
6’0.5″, 200 lbs.
Sophomore, No. 21, CB

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

Watkins was a four-star, Top 200 recruit by every service. But he was likely underrated (if you look at his offer list), mostly because he stayed away from the summer camp circuit.

Watkins had perhaps the most impressive offer sheet in his recruiting class, picking Notre Dame over Alabama, Auburn, Florida State, Georgia, LSU, Ohio State, Texas, USC and UCLA. Brian Kelly compared landing Watkins to “getting a No. 1 draft pick” on Signing Day.

 

PLAYING CAREER

Freshman Season (2014): Played in 11 games, making most of his appearances on special teams. Didn’t register any statistics.

 

WHAT WE SAID LAST YEAR

He beat out Atkinson and Brown, but the Irish played Devin Butler over Watkins last season. That isn’t likely to be the case this year.

While we heard about the good camp Josh Atkinson had, expect Watkins to make it into the mix before Atkinson or Jalen Brown. With Cody Riggs having the versatility to slide inside and cover slot receivers, Watkins could work into a rotation on the outside with Cole Luke and Devin Butler.

There doesn’t seem to be much room to hide in VanGorder’s scheme, so there could be some growing pains — not just for Watkins, but for all the cornerbacks. But make no mistake, Watkins is a key part of the Irish’s future in the secondary, and he’s still got a very good chance of helping out now as well.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

Physically, there’s everything to like about Watkins, who can learn quite a bit from KeiVarae Russell this season. That’s the type of player Watkins needs to force himself to be, and he certainly has the tools to do so.

If competition is what brings the best out in players than the push from some talented young freshman is a very good thing. Watkins has the length to be an outside player, something Crawford doesn’t possess.

Realistically, 2016 is when you’d expect Watkins to make his move into the starting lineup, paired with Luke as another veteran, talented duo. But if he’s going to be ready to do that, he’ll need to make progress this season, even if it’s mostly on the practice field and in nickel or dime situations.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

Right now, Watkins is the third cornerback in a defense with a high-ceiling starting pair. I can’t think of a Notre Dame defense that hasn’t relied on their third cornerback, and think back to when we all worried how the Irish were going to get Darrin Walls, Gary Gray and Robert Blanton onto the field. It’ll work itself out.

So Watkins will get the reps this season. Or at least the first shot at the reps, with Devin Butler and a trio of freshmen all right behind him. And if he’s going to stay on the field, he’ll need to fully embrace the mental side of the game. I expect Watkins to make major progress here, especially after the harsh realization that elite physical tools may make it easy to lock down receivers in high school, but in VanGorder’s system, knowledge is almost more important.

Watkins is still every bit the prospect he was when he signed with the Irish. After a freshman season spent on special teams, he’ll be asked to take on more as a sophomore.

While he’s a key piece of the Irish future, Watkins can help Notre Dame win this year as well.

 

THE 2015 IRISH A-to-Z
Josh Adams, RB
Josh Barajas, OLB
Nicky Baratti, S
Alex Bars, OL
Asmar Bilal, OLB
Hunter Bivin, OL
Grant Blankenship, DE
Jonathan Bonner, DE
Miles Boykin, WR
Justin Brent, WR
Greg Bryant, RB
Devin Butler, CB
Jimmy Byrne, OL
Daniel Cage, DL
Amir Carlisle, RB
Nick Coleman, DB
Te’von Coney, LB
Shaun Crawford, DB
Scott Daly, LS
Sheldon Day, DL
Michael Deeb, LB
Micah Dew-Treadway, DL
Steve Elmer, RG
Matthias Farley, DB
Nicco Fertitta, DB
Tarean Folston, RB
Will Fuller, WR
Jarrett Grace, LB
Jalen Guyton, WR
Mark Harrell, OL
Jay Hayes, DL
Mike Heuerman, TE
Kolin Hill, DE
Tristen Hoge, C
Corey Holmes, WR
Chase Hounshell, TE
Torii Hunter, Jr. WR
Alizé Jones, TE
Jarron Jones, DL
DeShone Kizer, QB
Tyler Luatua, TE
Cole Luke, CB
Nick Martin, C
Greer Martini, LB
Jacob Matuska, DL
Mike McGlinchey, OT
Colin McGovern, OL
Peter Mokwuah, DL
John Montelus, OL
Nyles Morgan, LB
Sam Mustipher, OL
Quenton Nelson, OL
Tyler Newsome, P
Romeo Okwara, DE
James Onwualu, LB
C.J. Prosise, WR/RB
Doug Randolph, LB/DE
Max Redfield, S
Corey Robinson, WR
Trevor Ruhland, OL
CJ Sanders, WR
Joe Schmidt, LB
Avery Sebastian, S
Elijah Shumate, S
Jaylon Smith, LB
Durham Smythe, TE
Equanimeous St. Brown, WR
Ronnie Stanley, LT
Elijah Taylor, DL
Brandon Tiassum, DL
Jerry Tillery, DL
Drue Tranquill, S
Andrew Trumbetti, DE
John Turner, S

Irish A-to-Z: John Turner

Rice v Notre Dame
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John Turner went from the bottom of the safety depth chart to the top of the outside linebackers in a spring, one of the primary beneficiaries of the transition to defensive coordinator Brian VanGorder. And while Turner was surpassed by converted wide receiver James Onwualu, the Indianapolis native supplied key support in special teams while providing some athleticism at a position that desperately needed it.

Back for what could be his final season in South Bend, Turner has a chance to make a name for himself doing some dirty work on special teams, while also providing top notch leadership as the Irish try to take a step forward.

Let’s take a closer look at what Turner can do during 2015.

 

JOHN TURNER
6’0.5″, 220 lbs.
Senior, No. 31, S

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

He earned a scholarship offer from Notre Dame after performing well at the school’s summer camp. Turner had a mostly regional offer list, but chose the Irish almost immediately after the offer, turning down in-state Indiana, Minnesota and a group of MAC programs.

Far from an elite recruit, Notre Dame’s staff got a look at the Indianapolis safety, a recruit who was one of the staff’s first blocks as they began rebuilding their efforts in the Hoosier state’s capital city.
PLAYING CAREER

Freshman Season (2012): Did not see action.

Sophomore Season (2013): Played in 13 games, mostly on special teams. Made four tackles on the season, including two against Navy.

Junior Season (2014): Played in all 13 games, mostly on special teams. Converted to outside linebacker during spring football but moved back to safety during the season.

 

WHAT WE SAID LAST YEAR

Turner didn’t managed to spend much time on the field, with VanGorder and the staff utilizing Onwualu when they needed an outside linebacker.

Kelly and his staff evaluate players by a variety of metrics. Championship player, winning player, replacement-level player and down the line. Turner likely slots in at that winning player level, capable of helping the Irish win, but still a rung or two short of being a starter on a playoff contending team.

But as the Irish begin to recruit to VanGorder’s profile, being on the radar isn’t enough. Turner needs to step his game up or risk being passed by a younger generation hand-picked by his defensive coordinator’s evaluation tools.

Yet if you want an optimistic take on Turner’s ability to help the Irish, consider his pedigree. That RKG background, developed as a state champion at a Catholic school in state, will help him become the type of program player that Kelly can feel safe building around.

In 2014, Turner will be an important piece of the puzzle, especially as Onwualu learns on the fly and Councell returns from an ACL injury. Moving forward, he’ll be challenged, and we’ll ultimately see if Turner thrives or moves to the background.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

At this point, Turner looks like a special teams contributor unless something drastic happens at safety. With an infusion of really young talent and Jaylon Smith’s ability to cross train, outside linebacker isn’t even Turner’s position, he’s back to being a safety, even if he’s not necessarily capable of being a half-field player.

All that being said, Turner will prove his contributions to the team on cover teams, serving as a key tackler on Scott Booker’s special teams units. While Turner seems on track to play out his collegiate career very close to his recruiting ranking, he has a fifth year of eligibility remaining if he and the Irish staff believe there’s something to be gained from returning in 2016. Otherwise, he could find his way onto another program and utilize the graduate transfer program or just graduate from Notre Dame and go pro in something other than sports.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

Not everybody can be a starter, and Turner will prove his value if he’s a consistent special teams performer. He’s got nice size at 220 pounds and will be a weapon on cover teams.

If the Irish get anything from Turner on defense, it’s likely a product of a really difficult depth chart situation, meaning injuries took over. But he’ll be ready for the opportunity and filled some holes at safety this spring when injuries took over.

If I’m guessing, the senior will be asked to do his job, mostly making tackles on 4th down.

 

THE 2015 IRISH A-to-Z
Josh Adams, RB
Josh Barajas, OLB
Nicky Baratti, S
Alex Bars, OL
Asmar Bilal, OLB
Hunter Bivin, OL
Grant Blankenship, DE
Jonathan Bonner, DE
Miles Boykin, WR
Justin Brent, WR
Greg Bryant, RB
Devin Butler, CB
Jimmy Byrne, OL
Daniel Cage, DL
Amir Carlisle, RB
Nick Coleman, DB
Te’von Coney, LB
Shaun Crawford, DB
Scott Daly, LS
Sheldon Day, DL
Michael Deeb, LB
Micah Dew-Treadway, DL
Steve Elmer, RG
Matthias Farley, DB
Nicco Fertitta, DB
Tarean Folston, RB
Will Fuller, WR
Jarrett Grace, LB
Jalen Guyton, WR
Mark Harrell, OL
Jay Hayes, DL
Mike Heuerman, TE
Kolin Hill, DE
Tristen Hoge, C
Corey Holmes, WR
Chase Hounshell, TE
Torii Hunter, Jr. WR
Alizé Jones, TE
Jarron Jones, DL
DeShone Kizer, QB
Tyler Luatua, TE
Cole Luke, CB
Nick Martin, C
Greer Martini, LB
Jacob Matuska, DL
Mike McGlinchey, OT
Colin McGovern, OL
Peter Mokwuah, DL
John Montelus, OL
Nyles Morgan, LB
Sam Mustipher, OL
Quenton Nelson, OL
Tyler Newsome, P
Romeo Okwara, DE
James Onwualu, LB
C.J. Prosise, WR/RB
Doug Randolph, LB/DE
Max Redfield, S
Corey Robinson, WR
Trevor Ruhland, OL
CJ Sanders, WR
Joe Schmidt, LB
Avery Sebastian, S
Elijah Shumate, S
Jaylon Smith, LB
Durham Smythe, TE
Equanimeous St. Brown, WR
Ronnie Stanley, LT
Elijah Taylor, DL
Brandon Tiassum, DL
Jerry Tillery, DL
Drue Tranquill, S
Andrew Trumbetti, DE

 

Irish A-to-Z: Andrew Trumbetti

Jarron Jones, Andrew Trumbetti, Devin Gardner
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After enrolling early for the spring, defensive end Andrew Trumbetti nearly became Notre Dame’s first ever true freshman starter at the position. He didn’t do it, with the Irish defensive staff choosing junior Romeo Okwara to run with the first team. But it’s worth putting that quick ascent into context, the young defensive lineman both quick out of the gate and one of the only options at a position that needed reloading.

Trumbetti’s solid performance as a freshman has some believing he’ll be ready to make a jump in 2015. While the depth chart remains virtually untouched, Trumbetti will likely team again with Okwara, both necessary pieces to a pass rushing puzzle that still needs to be solved.

 

Let’s take a look at the New Jersey native and see what we can expect in 2015.

 

ANDREW TRUMBETTI
6’3.5″, 260 lbs.
Sophomore, No. 98, DL

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

With offers from Florida, Florida State, Miami and Michigan State, Trumbetti was an Under Armour All-American and a four-star prospect. He chose Notre Dame fairly early in the recruiting process and enrolled early.

 

PLAYING CAREER

Freshman Season (2014): Played in 12 of 13 games, missing Purdue after suffering a concussion a week earlier. Trumbetti notched one sack on the year but managed a more-than-respectable 5.5. TFLs.

 

WHAT WE SAID LAST YEAR

All in all, Trumbetti had a successful freshman season, one of five freshmen to notch more than 10 tackles and he finished sixth on the team in tackles for loss. He showed he was a well-rounded football player, though the pass rush numbers didn’t necessarily come.

How well Trumbetti produces on the stat sheet likely says a little bit about Brian VanGorder as well as the freshman. If he’s capable of racking up a half-dozen sacks, then it’s a successful season, but also means that the Irish were able to manufacture a pass rush and put Trumbetti in a position to succeed.

Trumbetti needs to show he’s capable of doing more than just rushing the passer. He’ll be responsible for setting the edge of the defense and needs to hold up against the run as well. That makes his relationship with defensive line coach Mike Elston absolutely crucial, and he’ll need to be able to keep on (or build upon) the 251 pounds he’s playing at, a number probably lighter than optimal as he grows in the program.

Those that have seen Trumbetti play, either in high school or down at the Under Armour All-American game, tend to be believers in his ability to be an elite talent. If he’s at all capable of it, VanGorder and Elston will get it out of him, especially with the lack of pass rushers joining the 2015 recruiting class.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

Some people are incredibly high on Trumbetti, and see him as a future answer for the pass rush woes at the position. He’s got the motor, he’s plenty athletic and he has a full season under his belt so he has the type of experience you want. Supporting that is the fact that Trumbetti managed nearly half a dozen TFLs as a learn-as-you-go freshman.

Then again, the flip of that is Trumbetti’s single sack in 12 games. That doesn’t jump off the stat sheet nor give you confidence that he’ll transform into a quick-twitch, edge burner who can close on quarterbacks.

Ultimately, I’m not sure what his ceiling is yet. I think Trumbetti is going to be a productive college defensive end. Will he be a dominant player? He’ll need to capitalize on his opportunities to prove he has that ability in 2015.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

As we look at the ripple effects of Jarron Jones’ injury, you’ve got to think there are going to be more snaps for Trumbetti on the field this fall. Whether that means Isaac Rochell shifting inside and putting Okwara and Trumbetti as bookends or just making sure your four best defensive linemen get on the field, Trumbetti is very close to fitting that distinction.

But we need to see results in 2015. As Keith Gilmore continues his work with a depth chart that’s got decent talent but needs to maximize its ability, Trumbetti feels like a test case. He’s not big enough to succeed as a thumper in a 3-4. He’s not long and quick enough to be a true 4-3 weakside defensive end.But he’s got plenty of skills that should make him productive.

I’m skeptical, but still feel confident buying that Trumbetti takes a step forward and ultimately think he’s going to be more productive than his veteran teammate Okwara. While last season was mostly learn on the fly, if the Irish defense is going to be a Top 25 unit, they’ll need players like Trumbetti to make more than incremental progress.

I think five sacks and ten TFLs would be a great sophomore campaign.

 

THE 2015 IRISH A-to-Z
Josh Adams, RB
Josh Barajas, OLB
Nicky Baratti, S
Alex Bars, OL
Asmar Bilal, OLB
Hunter Bivin, OL
Grant Blankenship, DE
Jonathan Bonner, DE
Miles Boykin, WR
Justin Brent, WR
Greg Bryant, RB
Devin Butler, CB
Jimmy Byrne, OL
Daniel Cage, DL
Amir Carlisle, RB
Nick Coleman, DB
Te’von Coney, LB
Shaun Crawford, DB
Scott Daly, LS
Sheldon Day, DL
Michael Deeb, LB
Micah Dew-Treadway, DL
Steve Elmer, RG
Matthias Farley, DB
Nicco Fertitta, DB
Tarean Folston, RB
Will Fuller, WR
Jarrett Grace, LB
Jalen Guyton, WR
Mark Harrell, OL
Jay Hayes, DL
Mike Heuerman, TE
Kolin Hill, DE
Tristen Hoge, C
Corey Holmes, WR
Chase Hounshell, TE
Torii Hunter, Jr. WR
Alizé Jones, TE
Jarron Jones, DL
DeShone Kizer, QB
Tyler Luatua, TE
Cole Luke, CB
Nick Martin, C
Greer Martini, LB
Jacob Matuska, DL
Mike McGlinchey, OT
Colin McGovern, OL
Peter Mokwuah, DL
John Montelus, OL
Nyles Morgan, LB
Sam Mustipher, OL
Quenton Nelson, OL
Tyler Newsome, P
Romeo Okwara, DE
James Onwualu, LB
C.J. Prosise, WR/RB
Doug Randolph, LB/DE
Max Redfield, S
Corey Robinson, WR
Trevor Ruhland, OL
CJ Sanders, WR
Joe Schmidt, LB
Avery Sebastian, S
Elijah Shumate, S
Jaylon Smith, LB
Durham Smythe, TE
Equanimeous St. Brown, WR
Ronnie Stanley, LT
Elijah Taylor, DL
Brandon Tiassum, DL
Jerry Tillery, DL
Drue Tranquill, S

 

Fall camp mailbag: Moving on after bad news

North Carolina v Notre Dame
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So the Irish received their first bit of bad news in the 2015 season. Defensive tackle Jarron Jones is lost for the year and the Notre Dame defense will need to collectively replace Jones’ sizable place in the middle of the Irish defense.

I’ll start this mailbag off with a question I’ve seen thrown around the web the past few days:

 

On a scale of 1-to-10, how badly does Jarron Jones’ injury hurt Notre Dame’s defense?

I’m going to put it at a six out of 10. As I look at the defense, here are the player, in order, that the Irish can’t afford to lose. And as you can see, for as good as Jones could be, I don’t think he’s at the top of the list.

  1. Jaylon Smith
  2. Joe Schmidt
  3. KeiVarae Russell
  4. Max Redfield
  5. Cole Luke
  6. Sheldon Day
  7. Jarron Jones

 

You could probably debate this list—and really, it’s one of those arbitrary lists you write just because you have to when a situation like this comes up—but the loss of Jones’ talent and experience was painful, but there’s depth around him to make up for it.

Now getting to that point…

 

mediocrebob: If you had to pick one true freshman defensive player to break out and play a big role , who would it be and why? Offensive true frosh?

Even before this injury, my answer was Jerry Tillery. I just think he’s too talented to keep off the field. Throw in Jones’ injury and Tillery is going to get as much work as he can handle.

Offensively, I think I’m going with Equanimeous St. Brown. I was tempted to list CJ Sanders here, but ultimately, I think EQ is going to take the role of designated down-field threat, following in the long line of greats like Golden Tate and Will Fuller.

 

mattymill: We are always enamored with the new freshmen. I haven’t read the questions above, but I’m sure there are some asking who the breakout frosh will be. I’m wondering who will be the breakout soph that either didn’t play or didn’t contribute much last year? 2012 we had Golson, last year was Fuller. Who fits that bill in 2015? 

Good guess, Matt.

I’ll give you one on offense and one on defense. Offensively, I’ll go with Nic Weishar. He’s lit up fall camp and he is also taking advantage of nagging injuries that have slowed down Alizé Jones and Durham Smythe. It sounds like he’s a ball hawk and it also sounds like he’s developed quite a rapport with Malik Zaire. So keep an eye on Weishar.

Defensively, I’ll say Jonathon Bonner if I’m going with someone who hasn’t seen the field and Daniel Cage if I need to pick someone who has. Both are likely moving one-step closer to the field after the injury to Jarron Jones.

 

coachtemp: Keith, are you concerned as I am with who will actually call plays? After listening to Coach Denbrock, he said all three coaches work well together but he didn’t indicate who would actually be calling the plays. 

Sorry Temp, I just can’t get too worked up about this. I know you’d like Mike Sanford to call the plays on Saturdays but right now he’s been working in Kelly’s offense for a total of nine months. That’s just not enough experience, especially when Kelly is a 20-plus year veteran offensive playcaller and Denbrock is the most experienced assistant on Kelly’s staff.

Listen, I think it’s completely fair to be skeptical as to how this whole three-headed monster is going to work out. But I also don’t think it’s much of a leap to think that a guy like Denbrock and a young coach like Sanford can get along and find common ground. I truly believe him when he says “best idea wins,” and I think that it’ll be nice to see what that looks like.

 

irishfaithful666: After watching the highlights from the magical 2012 season, one thing stood out the most to me. When it was a big third down, with the game on the line one player consistently pulled through. Theo Riddick. Who do you see as the guy this year? Folston, Prosise, or Zaire? Also some big time clutch receptions were made by one T J Jones. Do we have these go to guys that can get it done when it matters most?

I’ll agree that Riddick definitely made his share of big plays. And he was rock solid against USC down the stretch. That said, I think this team is way better equipped for guys who can step up and make a play than the 2012 team was, especially on offense.

In the running game, I think Tarean Folston is a better all-around back than anybody on the 2012 team and C.J. Prosise has speed that nobody on the 2012 offense had. And while I think you might be getting the 2013 season mixed up when you mention TJ Jones, I’d take Will Fuller over Jones already and likely would also trust someone like Corey Robinson on 3rd-and-Need It over any receiver on the 2012 team minus Tyler Eifert.

 

 

 

 

sblxdoc: Why is it so difficult to get an elite pass rusher to Notre Dame? I ask this with complete sincerity, do you think there is a correlation with that position and academics/intelligence? It is so bizarre that we haven’t had this for years.

I’ll challenge the “we haven’t had this for years,” comment, considering in 2012 Stephon Tuitt was near the nation’s lead for sacks and nearly broke Justin Tuck’s single-season record. But I get your point in general, though I’ll point out that not every team—not even elite teams—have a speed demon coming off the edge.

(Go look at the Alabama team that knocked ND out in the opening minutes of the BCS title game.)

Sure, there’s been some bad luck at the position. (Lynch transferred, the slew of unproven kids that just took off, too.) But I think if Notre Dame’s defense plays like it’s capable of this season, there’s going to be a defensive end that jumps off the stat sheet for the Irish this season, and I also think Notre Dame is going to flip a big name pass rusher as we get closer to Signing Day.

This defensive scheme should help recruit better edge rushers. But Kelly has mentioned it more than once: Most teams don’t get to the quarterback with just a great pass rusher at defensive end. So expect the Irish to manufacture some of their pressure until they’re able to find the right guy.

 

ndrocks2: Keith is the next ND player on our roster who will get 10 sacks in a season?

If VanGorder wants to turn Jaylon Smith into a 10-sack player, he can be it this season. Otherwise, I could see someone like Okwara exploding during his senior season or possible Sheldon Day, who’ll get some chances to rush the passer from the edge.

Andrew Trumbetti should have that ability come 2016, and I also think we need to see how someone like Jon Bonner does now that he’s activated.

 

@JMSet3: When back on campus do you use Eddy St Bookstore or keep it old school and stick to campus store?

If it’s a game weekend, I’m staying out of both of them. I tried finding gloves during the freezing rain against Stanford and both were complete zoos.

But I’ll be on campus Monday evening and Tuesday for media day, and I’ll probably hit up the book store, just because it’s “more authentic.” But I would point out that the true “old school” bookstore is long gone…

 

padomer: Not entirely training camp related however a suggestion/request…I know you’re probably stretched thin, but have you ever considered a podcast? ISD and BnG are the only ND podcasts I’ve found (and thoroughly enjoy them) but this is probably my first click when it comes to ND news, I think a podcast would be a lot of fun and something the rest of your followers (as well as yourself) may enjoy. Thoughts?

I love podcasts. I’ve thought long and hard about doing one, but more often than not, I’m mostly just a guest on them.

I think the podcasts you mentioned are good ones. I was also just a guest on Irish Sports Radio and I think the guys at One Foot Down and Her Loyal Sons do them, too. But do yourself a favor and check out Irish Illustrated’s podcast. Pete, Tim (and now Tim O.) do a great job and drop a lot of insider knowledge.