Notre Dame quarterback DeShone Kizer (14) runs for a first down against Texas during the first half of an NCAA college football game, Sunday, Sept. 4, 2016, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
AP / Eric Gay

Talking Irish: Week One recap with JJ Stankevitz

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The Avengers. The DC Universe. If this summer has taught us anything, it’s that people love superheroes uniting and merging universes.

(Or the exact opposite.)

Anyway, partner in crime—and member of the NBC/Comcast universe—JJ Stankevitz and I joined forces for what I hope will be an enjoyable new feature. Its the two of us chatting about Notre Dame football, something we already do pretty much non-stop this time of year, me here at Inside the Irish and JJ over at CSN Chicago.

So with a disappointing Texas game behind us and the home opener just around the corner, let’s roll out our first weekly installment.

Hope you enjoy.

Keith: I’ll be the first to admit it, I was surprised that Notre Dame lost last weekend. I looked at everything and just couldn’t figure out how this was a 2-pt line. Did you see this coming?

JJ: I mean, I predicted a Notre Dame 30-23 win, so I guess I didn’t.
But I’ll say this: That was mostly predicated on me not thinking Texas’ offense was going to be good enough. But as soon as Buechele led that first scoring drive and the 18-wheeler package started humming, I wished I could’ve gone back and re-done my prediction.

I still probably would’ve picked ND to win, but I would’ve gone with Texas scoring more points. There was just so much uncertainty going into that game.

Did Texas’ offense surprise you, Keith, or did Notre Dame’s defense disappoint you? Or somewhere in between?

Keith: It’s got to be somewhere in between — but I was super surprised at the defensive line play — namely, that I thought the guys up front got whipped, and they got whipped by a group that was banged up entering the game. Texas’s push at the point of attack really surprised me.

I’m less surprised by Buechele actually — while everybody started writing the legend, I secretly hoped we didn’t just give birth to another Tate Forcier. What do you do with the DL?

JJ: I mean, the stats don’t lie — ND was better with four down linemen than three. So I go with four.

Keith: I can’t claim to be a tape-breakdown expert, but it certainly wasn’t Andrew Trumbetti’s finest performance.

JJ: Whether that would’ve solved everything, we don’t know, but Brian Kelly admitted Tuesday he would’ve had more big bodies in against the Swoopes package. But even with four DLs there, they needed to generate a more consistent push.

Keith: That weakside DE position took exactly 5 minutes to be exposed as a problem.

JJ: I’d expect to see a lot of Jay Hayes there when he’s fully healthy. He took most of the first-team reps at that spot during the spring and preseason practices open to the media and looked solid enough there.
That being said, I don’t expect to see him this weekend, do you?

Keith: At this point, I’d have the guy with his foot elevated between now and next Tuesday, hoping he’s ready for a slugfest in the trenches against Michigan State.

JJ: If he’s healthy, he’ll play – no reason to hold out a guy who’s 100%. But it’s a short week and Nevada isn’t exactly a star opponent, so I could see him getting limited snaps. But you gotta get him some work so his first real test since 2014 won’t be against that bruising Michigan State side.

Keith: Remember, he was “healthy” heading into Texas, too.

JJ: I guess to put a wrap on the defense: Are you confident it can pull together and be good enough for Notre Dame to still have a successful year?

Keith: Successful yes. But I’m not sure what that means anymore. I had 10 to 11 wins as possible for this team.

JJ: I realize that was a loaded question, ha.

Keith:  And I really did think the defensive would play much, much better.
Now I probably have taken a step away from the ledge when it comes to Brian VanGorder, and I actually think BK is right to be preaching patience here — he’s breaking in SO many new players and doing it without a safety who was probably one of the three most important people on this defense, but this team will only be as good as its defense. And right now, that’s not very good.

JJ: Look, you can win a lot of games with your offense bailing out an underperforming defense. But you can’t contend for a playoff spot with that.

Keith: I think that’s true. Maybe Oklahoma would disagree — at least last year — but underperforming is one thing. What those guys did on Sunday night wasn’t underperforming.

JJ: The Big 12 is a different animal with that, though. Underperforming was last year’s defense.

Keith:  I’ll leave my defensive comments at this: I’m worried about not just the scheme, but the personnel. That’s what was more surprising to me. That ND’s guys were getting blown off the ball and their DBs were getting torched vertical.

JJ: There are a few individual players who looked good Sunday — Nyles Morgan and Shaun Crawford come to mind — but the whole defense has to be better.

But you raise the question: Can it?If the personnel isn’t there, and the scheme isn’t there, then what is? I guess we have 11 games to find out.

Keith: That’s essentially the big rub on the Brian VanGorder defense. What do you hang your hat on? This is starting to feel pretty “Tenuta-ish.”

***

Keith: So DeShone Kizer announced that DeShone Kizer would be the team’s starting quarterback. What do you make of the decision? And what do you think of BK having Kizer handle it?

JJ: That it was obvious? The way it was handled made sense.

On one hand, Kelly and Kizer talked, and it was clear Kizer was going to be the starter. Kizer was the only QB who talked to the media on Wednesday, so if he didn’t say anything about being the starter and delayed the announcement to Thursday, it would’ve raised far more questions than ND would’ve wanted.

But on the other hand, if Kelly came out Wednesday and briefly told us that Kizer was his starter, it’d be making a bigger deal out of it than I think anyone wants. It was clear Kizer outplayed Zaire and was going to be the starter, so don’t make a big deal out of it and let Kizer say it and move on.

Long story short: Having Kizer announce it was the path of least resistance and most common sense. I was fine with it.

KA: I couldn’t agree more. Nothing diffuses this like having Kizer talk about it. It also keeps all of us from picking around at BK, asking him how Malik took it, blah blah blah…

What do you think happens with Malik? I tend to think he’ll still get a series against Nevada in the first half. If only to get the bad taste out of his mouth.

JJ: It’s hard to not feel sorry for the kid, right? It’s a tough situation.

Keith: This feels pulled straight from Friday Night Lights or something.

JJ: He *should* be starting. He would’ve in 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013, and probably should’ve in 2014, in retrospect. But then he wins the starting job, gets hurt, and a guy who’s turning into a first-round pick right before our eyes comes along and takes his spot.

Keith: But the flip of that is: Damn — DeShone Kizer is good.

JJ: He’s so good!

Keith: This is a guy who Brian Kelly praised on Signing Day for being: Tall. Big. And Tall — in that order.

JJ: Bruce Feldman had a good look back at his recruiting process over on Fox Sports this week. Kizer was about as unimpressive in the Elite 11 as possible because he wasn’t solely focused on being a QB then.

But Kizer talked about it Wednesday and said something interesting — that being a three-sport athlete in high school was the best thing that ever happened to him. Not only did he gain other mental/physical skills from playing basketball and baseball, but it delayed the information dump about being a QB until he was mature enough to handle it.

So instead of having all this stuff thrown at him at age 16, he’s getting it at age 19, 20, and understands it better and is mature enough to handle it now. And we’re seeing him develop into a guy who could be a legit Heisman contender and first-round pick.

Keith: Pete Carroll once told me that he preferred recruiting multi-sport athletes. He thought they could be molded much better at college.

JJ: I’ve had a number of people in MLB front offices and clubhouses tell me they like multi-sport athletes more, too. So what was your favorite play Kizer made Sunday night? The somersault TD throw to ESB, the 29-yard TD run, the scramble-and-throw TD to Torii Hunter or the teardrop to Adams?

Keith: The throw to Adams, for sure. And honestly, I don’t think he played his best game. And I think the receivers were a big part of the problem.
I thought the offense came unglued once Torii Hunter got hurt. And it was because they had three or four kids lined up out there that didn’t seem to have a clue as to what they were doing.

JJ: Agreed. I think it was on the possession after that ridiculous two-point blocked PAT score where Kizer threw incomplete to Kevin Stepherson on third down. Having Hunter there would’ve been huge for that drive.

***

Keith: What do you want to see this weekend?

JJ:  First and foremost, Notre Dame’s defense has to get some positive momentum behind it. Nevada nearly lost to Cal Poly, which went 4-7 at FCS last year, so even though they’ve made back-to-back bowl games Brian Polian doesn’t quite bring the strongest side to South Bend.

This is a good opportunity for Notre Dame’s defense to get the bad taste out of its mouth from Texas and hold an opponent to, ideally, under 20 points. No explosive plays, make some third down stops, and hold them to a reasonable YPP average. Second, just for Kizer to continue to develop a rapport with the young WRs, especially assuming Hunter is out. Make sense? What about you?

Keith: Mostly good defense and a non-competitive game. I think this team can still achieve all of their goals. But they have to win. And they need to get themselves prepared for a tough run in the schedule. But defense first and foremost. And no broken plays.

JJ: Yep yep yep. Selfishly, I would like to not have six or seven re-writes of my game story, as was the case on Sunday.

Got a prediction? I’ll go first: Notre Dame 52, Nevada 24

Keith: I like that number. I think getting to the 50-point mark should be the goal — and to do it in regulation time.

Can I steal your score? That’s pretty solid.

Kizer set to start against Nevada

AUSTIN, TX - SEPTEMBER 04:  DeShone Kizer #14 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish looks to pass the ball during the second half against the Texas Longhorns at Darrell K. Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium on September 4, 2016 in Austin, Texas.  (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
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Brian Kelly has named a starting quarterback. And as most expected, it’ll be DeShone Kizer.

The junior quarterback met with the local media today and confirmed the decision, the only one of the two quarterbacks to be made available. As you’d expect, Kizer was magnanimous in his comments, saying all the right things about the job, his responsibilities as a starter, and his fellow competitor, senior Malik Zaire.

“I had a conversation with Coach Kelly today and he decided that this week I was going to get the first snap for sure, and he kind of congratulated me on fighting through the process and encouraged me to maintain the same mindset and just ensure me that I would be the guy on Saturday,” Kizer said, according to CSN Chicago’s JJ Stankevitz.

“There’s one quarterback now, but two leaders,” Kizer said. “Obviously Malik is an amazing athlete and there’s going to come a time where you’re definitely going to see him on the field, I believe. That hasn’t really been talked about too much. All I know is that he told me to prepare to be the starter on Saturday and that’s what I plan to do.”

For Zaire, the disappointment is likely still fresh. But it’s something Kelly discussed on Tuesday, keeping a back-up quarterback engaged and ready to step into the fray, just one snap away from leading the offense.

“It’s about your attitude and your attitude has to be such that whoever the No. 2 is, whether he’s the No. 2 quarterback or the No. 2 running back, you’re one play away from being in there,” Kelly said. “So you can’t let your teammates down and you can’t let yourself down.”

What comes next for Zaire is uncertain. Irish Illustrated’s Pete Sampson reports that Zaire can graduate after the fall semester, making a graduate transfer something possible for spring semester. But that’s a scenario for down the road—unimportant as the Irish stare down the barrel of a one-loss season and a team that needs to find its footing this weekend.

Polian prepares for Notre Dame

COLLEGE STATION, TX - SEPTEMBER 19:  Nevada Wolf Pack head coach Brian Polian has words with linejudge Michael Shirey and referee David South at Kyle Field on September 19, 2015 in College Station, Texas.  (Photo by Bob Levey/Getty Images)
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This won’t be just any other game for Nevada head coach Brian Polian. The Wolf Pack head coach returns to South Bend this weekend, where he served as an assistant to Charlie Weis from 2005 to 2009. And while his time coaching the Irish ended when Weis was dismissed by athletic director Jack Swarbrick, Polian’s fondness for Notre Dame is undiminished.

“It was an incredibly formative time in my life and my career,” Polian said on Tuesday. “I have personal feelings for the place that you can’t help…

“I’m forever indebted to Charlie Weis for giving me the opportunity at 29 years of age to go coach there. My memories of the university and my time there are very fond. They’re very warm.”

Now he faces the challenge of beating the very same program that made it possible for him to quickly climb the coaching ladder. And even if the Wolf Pack catch the Irish with an opening game loss and questions on both sides of the ball, Polian knows—and speaks from experience—that things aren’t quite as dire as they seem.

“I think there’s part of the fan base that thinks the sky is falling right now, and I can assure them, it’s not,” Polian said.

So the fourth-year head coach, just 19-20 in his three seasons after taking over for legendary coach Chris Ault, will bring his program to South Bend looking for a “signature win.” The last time the Wolf Pack visited, Ault’s more talented team—led by star quarterback Colin Kaepernick—left disappointed, shutout by Jon Tenuta’s Irish defense.

While there’s no way to draw off that disappointing experience and visit to a place Polian calls “one of the great cathedrals in college football,” he believes some of the big stages his team has played on lately will have them better prepared to deal with a soldout home crowd eager to see the Irish play well.

“Once you’ve played on the road in the SEC, it might be the same but it won’t be any harder,” Polian said, referencing last year’s visit to Texas A&M, where the Wolf Pack fought hard, but eventually lost 44-27. “There were 102,000 at Texas A&M last year and we hung in there and fought out tails off. I have no reason to think we won’t do the same this week.”

After needing overtime to beat Cal Poly last week, Polian expects to see improvement from his young team. That said, he knows Notre Dame will have the same jump, sounding almost sympathetic to the youthful nature of the Irish secondary.

“I don’t care where you are, if you’ve got three freshman playing in the defensive backfield, it’s hard—it doesn’t matter what school you’re at,” Polian said. “Freshmen are freshman. No matter how talented they are, they lack experience. And then you put them in front of 103,000 in that setting, and obviously there’s going to be some growing pains. I have no doubt that they’ll be significantly improved with that experience when they face us.”

***

Speaking of the Notre Dame secondary, the starting lineup appears to be tweaked, with Devin Studstill starting opposite Drue Tranquill. Last week, the Irish chose to go with Tranquill and Avery Sebastian. They abandoned that pairing midway through the game, pulling Tranquill in favor of Studstill when it was clear that the 230-pounder wasn’t going to be able to run vertical with the opponent.

Kelly talked about making sure Tranquill was back on his game—a very important piece of the puzzle, especially back at home as a strong safety and will Sebastian a game-time decision after suffering a concussion late in the game against Texas.

“We’ve got to get him back out there and, again, it’s a learning process,” Kelly said. “Some of the mistakes out there were ones that he’s aware of that, again, we just have to be better.

“We’ve got to communicate and teach better. We’ve got to make sure that he’s clearly understanding what we’re asking of him and making sure that we get that on game day. So we come back out and make sure that Drue understands what is expected and he needs to come through for us.”

***

A week after Jay Hayes didn’t play a snap, Kelly is hopeful the veteran defensive end will be able to contribute, sharing some of the load with junior Andrew Trumbetti.

“It was a personnel kind of game for us in terms of running Jay Hayes in and out of the game there,” Kelly conceded. “It was going to be difficult with him not at 100 percent. He should be closer this week to being able to give us reps.”

If I’m reading between the lines, I’d expect the Irish staff to do everything they can to get Hayes back to full go before putting him on the field, especially knowing that Michigan State is just a week away.

Perhaps that opens the door for freshman Daelin Hayes to get some playing time, capable of coming off the edge in speed situations. Whatever the case, the Irish need Trumbetti to be better.

And in that corner… The Nevada Wolf Pack

TUCSON, AZ - DECEMBER 29:  Running back James Butler #20 of the Nevada Wolf Pack leaps over safety Trent Matthews #16 of the Colorado State Rams as he rushes the football during the fourth quarter of the Nova Home Loans Arizona Bowl at Arizona Stadium on December 29, 2015 in Tucson, Arizona. The Wolf Pack defeated the Rams 28-23. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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The Irish have a home opener to prepare for. And a week after being the centerpiece on the biggest opening weekend college football can remember, they’ve got a distinctly different job—getting ready for a game that’s far from buzz worthy.

That doesn’t mean the Nevada Wolf Pack should be taken lightly. Even after squeaking out an overtime victory against FCS Cal Poly, Brian Polian brings his young team into South Bend intent on being the latest former Notre Dame assistant to topple the Irish.

With an experienced quarterback and a talented ground game, Polian must feel good after watching the Notre Dame defense struggle with Texas. Even as he did his best to assuage Irish fans that the sky wasn’t falling, there’s likely more confidence coming from Reno than if Notre Dame was riding high off a comeback victory.

Joining us during a busy week is the Reno Gazette-Journal’s Chris Murray. Murray is the RGJ’s sports columnist, and has had a front row seat for Brian Polian’s takeover of the Wolf Pack’s football program. He’s done the dirty work that comes with helping Irish fans get beyond a tough night in Austin and get ready for the home opener.

Hope you enjoy.

 

Seemed like a tale of two halves last Saturday as Nevada pulled out an overtime win against Cal Poly. At their best, the Wolf Pack made things look easy. At their worse, things got beyond interesting, especially when Cal Poly had a chance to win on a two-point conversion attempt late. What’d you make of the Wolf Pack’s 2016 debut?

I would grade it a C- or D+ overall simply for being pushed into overtime by an FCS team that went 4-7 last season. Of course, Cal Poly runs a triple-option and has led the FCS in rushing three straight seasons, so it was an odd matchup. The defense actually looked fine but the offense didn’t take advantage of a Cal Poly defense that allowed more than 35 points per game to FCS foes last year.

The offensive looked great in the first quarter but did almost nothing for the rest of the game, including just 14 plays (and two first downs) on four series in the second half. That was worrisome as was the fact Nevada couldn’t put away Cal Poly after a strong first 15 minutes. It will take us a couple of months to see if this was an anomaly or a foreshadowing of how the rest of the season will play out. Obviously, Nevada hopes it is the former.

 

Notre Dame fans have known Brian Polian since Charlie Weis had him on his coaching staff. Polian seemed a long way from a head coaching gig in those years, known mostly for his huge recruiting win landing Manti Te’o. You had an excellent profile of Polian before the season started, but what’s his tenure been like in Reno?

Slow-moving might be the best way to put it. He’s now one-game below .500 since he became Nevada’s head coach in 2013 (19-20 overall) and while he’s clearly improved the Wolf Pack’s classroom efforts and kept the team out of the “bad part of the newspaper,” as Nevada’s athletic director put it, the Wolf Pack seems stuck at the 7-6 mark, which is where it was in the two years before Polian was hired.

The offense has declined during his tenure while the defense has improved. This was expected to be the breakthrough season and it still could but that first impression wasn’t the best. Wolf Pack fans also don’t seem to be completely on board as the season-opening attendance was under 20,000, its lowest for a home opener since 2010 (when Nevada counted actual attendance rather than tickets distributed). After this season, Polian has only one year left on his contract, so it’s kind of a make-or-break season. He did say that without his stint at Notre Dame he wouldn’t be a head coach today. He was very complementary of his time in South Bend.

 

Quarterback Tyler Stewart seemed to pick up where he left off after a nice junior season — showing some much improved accuracy against Cal Poly when they committed to stopping the run. Obviously, he’ll face a stiffer opponent next Saturday. But is it as simple as saying the offense will succeed if Stewart plays well? Or is getting James Butler and the ground game rolling behind an experienced offensive line more important?

Given how much emphasis Nevada puts on its rushing attack, I think it’s fair to say that how the Wolf Pack will run the ball will dictate its offensive success. Obviously the quarterback has a huge role in every offense and that’s no different for Nevada. If the Wolf Pack is going to compete for a Mountain West West Division title or flirt with nine or 10 wins, Stewart has to be a top-50 quarterback in the nation.

He doesn’t have to carry the team like Colin Kaepernick and Cody Fajardo did in recent seasons, but he has guide a more explosive passing attack, which is under the direction of first-year coordinator Tim Cramsey. Still, the Wolf Pack is going to run the ball 60 percent of the time and wants to pound away on first and second down and then use play action. So, the run game is the biggest key.

 

Defensively, it’s tough to take much from a season opener against an opponent like Cal Poly. But Scott Boone’s troops came up with some big plays when they needed to, especially in overtime. Who are a few defenders who need to play big on Saturday in South Bend.

Yeah, there’s not much Notre Dame can derive from the Wolf Pack’s opener, which Scott Boone likes. He’s made some changes in the offseason that will debut against Notre Dame and is hopeful that’s an advantage because the Irish haven’t seen the Wolf Pack’s traditional defense yet this season.

The top two playmakers are the safeties: Dameon Baber, who was second-team All-MW last year as a true freshman (he didn’t debut until game four because he was going to redshirt) and Asauni Rufus, who led Nevada with 105 tackles last season as a redshirt freshman. Both of those guys are excellent athletes, especially Baber, who originally committed to Oregon State out of high school.

The front seven is young, with six new starters. If there’s one guy you want to key on who could give Notre Dame trouble it is sophomore defensive end Malik Reed, who the coaches are high on. He has to get pressure in the backfield all game long if Nevada has a shot at the upset.

 

Notre Dame’s coming off a short week and an emotional loss. Polian knows Notre Dame. Can Nevada play better than the last time they came to South Bend, when Colin Kaepernick, Chris Ault and a very good Nevada team got blown away?

Nevada is hoping it does better than that 35-0 performance. There are two things playing in Nevada’s favor: (1) The extra prep time. Nevada played Friday and Notre Dame late Sunday. That’s two extra days or prep. Plus, Notre Dame is playing Nevada between two big games (Texas and Michigan State). Not matter what they say, the Irish aren’t going to treat Nevada like those other two teams; and (2) The Wolf Pack has played at Texas A&M (in 2015) and Florida State and UCLA (in 2013) in recent seasons, so the big stage shouldn’t be an issue.

The Wolf Pack played Texas A&M tough (44-27 with Nevada inside the 10-yard line in the final minutes before essentially taking a knee) in front of 103,000 fans. So, 80,000 at Notre Dame shouldn’t be an issue. That doesn’t mean Nevada is going to threaten in this one, but the size of the game shouldn’t derail them. Nevada’s 2009 roster that lost at Notre Dame, 35-0, was one of the most talented in school history. The Wolf Pack just didn’t show up in that game. Even though this Nevada team isn’t as talented, it should do better than 35-0.

***

Do yourself a favor and catch up by giving Chris a follow on Twitter @MurrayRGJ. Also spend a few minutes reading his profile on Brian Polian, which I really enjoyed. 

 

Irish move forward to Nevada

Notre Dame head coach Brian Kelly, center, watches as his players run off the field during the first half of an NCAA college football game against Texas , Sunday, Sept. 4, 2016, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
AP / Eric Gay
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Brian Kelly‘s weekly Tuesday press conference came early, a Sunday kickoff and a holiday Monday making it even tougher to get past the season-opening loss to Texas. But even if a faulty camera made for some interesting press conference shenanigans, Notre Dame’s seventh-year head coach is moving on.

For the Irish, that means putting Texas behind them. That also means a head coach preaching the message of finishing the job to his young team, a reminder that it was Notre Dame that gave up a fourth-quarter lead after roaring back from a 17-point deficit.

So with Nevada rapidly approaching, Kelly and his team are turning the page.

“The message to the team yesterday was about closing and finishing, and hard-fought games on the road against quality opposition you’ve got to finish,” Kelly said. “That’s what we did not do in this game, we didn’t finish and that will be a ‘watch word’ for this group as we move forward.”

For most, the immediate question was Kelly’s starting quarterback. But with the calendar compressed, Kelly still hasn’t formally discussed the job with the two candidates.  While that’ll lead to some grumbling by fans and outsiders who saw Sunday night in Austin as a decisive vote for DeShone Kizer’s candidacy, Kelly doesn’t expect this to linger on.

“Look, they’re both really good players. I think we could all agree in this room. Now it’s not about anything else but how you accept your role,” Kelly said.

“He’s got to prepare himself as if he’s the starter. So I think all of that is about your attitude and how you accept that role and how it’s embraced. That to me is the most important element of this.”

***

Questions about Notre Dame’s defense continued Tuesday. When asked about his team’s scheme and their ability to slow down the Longhorns, Kelly thought his team’s issues were less about communication and handling Texas’ up-tempo attack and more about executing the game plan.

“Tempo was not a factor this the game for us. Our guys played a lot of plays in very humid conditions. It wasn’t an issue in terms of communication,” Kelly said. Our mistakes were one where we weren’t in the wrong coverage or the fronts…. It was just—we’ve got to execute better, tackle better.”

In a similar tone, Kelly seemed to dismiss some of the criticism directed at defensive coordinator Brian VanGorder. Echoing comments he made the day before during his media teleconference, Kelly once again preached patience as he pushed back at the idea that VanGorder’s job status should be in question.

“It’s great conversation for everybody to have, but it’s so short-sighted of what really happened in the Texas game,” Kelly said, when asked if he thought he had the right man for the defensive coordinator job. “If we’re 10 or 11 games into the season and we have to outscore everybody, I’ll take the questions, you know? And I would say, ‘fair enough.’

“We’re in game one of a brand new offense that we saw for the first time, and we got ten guys that went to the NFL off this team. So I just think we’re jumping the gun. If we’re ten games into this and we’re giving up 50 points a game, I’ll have to answer your questions. Right now, as I said yesterday, I think you all should relax a little bit.

“I think our defense is going to be fine.”