Tweetcap: More from training camp at Culver

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The Notre Dame football team is in their final day of workouts at the Culver Academies, spending the morning in full pads before making their way back to campus. Tomorrow marks the beginning of two-a-day sessions, one of three planned this training camp.

While we won’t hear from Brian Kelly until Thursday, there’s been plenty of good stuff hitting the web. So here’s another edition of the Tweetcap, where  a little curation gives you the greatest hits of the first five days of workouts, courtesy of WatchND, @NDFootball and Fighting Irish Media.

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ESPN is at practice today, with the GameDay crew getting their first look at the Irish. Want proof? They posted a Vine of Malik Zaire warming up.

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Expect a sit down with linebackers Joe Schmidt and Jaylon Smith to be hitting the web and television later today. (Unless Rece just really wanted to find a nice place to chat—can you blame him? What a solid view…)

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Also, a year after we saw Brian Kelly do his best General Custer, ESPN’s Rece Davis gives it a try.

(Let’s just say he looks more natural than Danny Kanell.)

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Back to the football… The social media team behind @NDFootball did a nice job of posting some photos the past few days. Check them out below:

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As for some video highlights, WatchND and Fighting Irish Media had a nice one-on-one with associate head coach Mike Denbrock. Perhaps the “glue” of the offensive coaching staff, Denbrock gave up the title of offensive coordinator, but certainly hasn’t lost his role in the leadership.

While we haven’t seen how the new structure will work once the snaps go live, it was interesting to hear how Denbrock talked about the three-headed monster atop the offense, with Brian Kelly and Mike Sanford each having a say.

“I think it starts with the three individuals that you’re talking about who don’t really care about who gets the credit for what our offense looks like, they just want our football team to be successful,” Denbrock said.

“Myself, Coach Kelly and Mike Sanford sit down, and it’s a strong collaboration of ideas and ways to do thing. It’s best idea wins and we come out with a clear message to the football team about how we want to do things. It’s been an incredible positive thing. I know people could kind of read into it saying this might be an issue or that might be an issue, but there is no issue, except getting our football team ready to win.”

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You’ve got to expect the annual “Day at the beach” video coming, where we see the guys on the football team kick back and try their hand at tubing, wake boarding or catching a sunfish. Here’s proof that a little R&R took place, with Jerry Tillery proving speed boats can handle people that are six-foot-six and 300-plus pounds.

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Lastly, Notre Dame had a special visitor at practice yesterday when retired Navy SEAL Marcus Luttrell paid a visit to training camp. The inspiration for the film “Lone Survivor,” Luttrell spent some time talking to the team, likely about his harrowing experience and also about the commitment and teamwork it takes to be a member of the SEALS.

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For more videos, including some top plays from practice, check out the full camp coverage at WatchND.

 

Irish A-to-Z: Equanimeous St. Brown

247 Sports
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After a long battle that included many West Coast powers, Notre Dame landed talented wide receiver Equanimeous St. Brown just before Signing Day, the end of a long recruitment by Notre Dame’s associate head coach Mike Denbrock. A long, fast, intriguing athlete, St. Brown now joins one of the most talented position groups on campus.

Looking like a young Corey Robinson, St. Brown adds another physical mismatch to a depth chart that’s diversifying quickly. Paired with Miles Boykin, the Irish have freshmen twin towers, and both have already earned positive reviews in their short time on campus.

Let’s dig into one of the more interesting athletes on campus.

 

EQUANIMEOUS ST. BROWN
6’4″, 205 lbs.
Freshman, No. 86, WR

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

St. Brown was a Top 250 player, an Under Armour All-American and had offers from many of the Pac-12’s elite programs, not to mention more than a few national offers.

Even as he put up modest numbers in an injury-plagued senior season, St. Brown picked the Irish over Utah, LSU, Miami, Stanford, Tennessee, UCLA and USC (and a few dozen more).

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

If you’re looking for interesting young talent, ESB fits the bill. The son of a world-class body builder and a German-born mother, St. Brown speaks three languages, has studied internationally as a child and feels like a perfect prototype for a football recruit—he’s been weight training with his father since he was five years old. More importantly? Notre Dame has already offered one of his younger brothers and has the other on their radar, and there are two additional St. Brown’s coming through the Orange County football scene that the Irish plan on pursuing.

St. Brown looked the part on the camp circuit but didn’t get much of an opportunity to show those skills at Servite. But from the sounds of it, he’s blessed with velcro hands and speed that’s close to elite. Again, we’ll see how he looks when it’s finally time to take the field, but if you’re looking for upside, it’s hard to look past a guy who was essentially the Dos Equis Man of recruits.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

I don’t really see a world where St. Brown plays this season. It doesn’t make a ton of sense, especially with the depth in front of him. That said, if he’s able to push his way onto the field, he’s got the length and the jumping ability to be a candidate for the “freshman designated deep ball target.” That’s been a promising sign.

Otherwise, St. Brown can spend the season getting used to a college offense that’s far more complex than the one he ran in high school. That shouldn’t be much of a challenge for a guy who speaks German at home with his mother and has AP credits falling out of his pockets, so however 2015 plays out for St. Brown, the future is bright.

 

THE 2015 IRISH A-to-Z
Josh Adams, RB
Josh Barajas, OLB
Nicky Baratti, S
Alex Bars, OL
Asmar Bilal, OLB
Hunter Bivin, OL
Grant Blankenship, DE
Jonathan Bonner, DE
Miles Boykin, WR
Justin Brent, WR
Greg Bryant, RB
Devin Butler, CB
Jimmy Byrne, OL
Daniel Cage, DL
Amir Carlisle, RB
Nick Coleman, DB
Te’von Coney, LB
Shaun Crawford, DB
Scott Daly, LS
Sheldon Day, DL
Michael Deeb, LB
Micah Dew-Treadway, DL
Steve Elmer, RG
Matthias Farley, DB
Nicco Fertitta, DB
Tarean Folston, RB
Will Fuller, WR
Jarrett Grace, LB
Jalen Guyton, WR
Mark Harrell, OL
Jay Hayes, DL
Mike Heuerman, TE
Kolin Hill, DE
Tristen Hoge, C
Corey Holmes, WR
Chase Hounshell, TE
Torii Hunter, Jr. WR
Alizé Jones, TE
Jarron Jones, DL
DeShone Kizer, QB
Tyler Luatua, TE
Cole Luke, CB
Nick Martin, C
Greer Martini, LB
Jacob Matuska, DL
Mike McGlinchey, OT
Colin McGovern, OL
Peter Mokwuah, DL
John Montelus, OL
Nyles Morgan, LB
Sam Mustipher, OL
Quenton Nelson, OL
Tyler Newsome, P
Romeo Okwara, DE
James Onwualu, LB
C.J. Prosise, WR/RB
Doug Randolph, LB/DE
Max Redfield, S
Corey Robinson, WR
Trevor Ruhland, OL
CJ Sanders, WR
Joe Schmidt, LB
Avery Sebastian, S
Elijah Shumate, S
Jaylon Smith, LB
Durham Smythe, TE

 

Irish A-to-Z: Durham Smythe

Durham Smythe
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After two seasons waiting his turn, junior tight end Durham Smythe is ready for his opportunity to be the next great Notre Dame tight end. The Texas native, who’ll open up his junior season against the in-state team he was long committed to as a recruit, has the inside track on a starting job with no incumbent, the first time in a long time that’s happened.

After a few years of diversifying the talent pool at the position, Smythe still looks like the prototype for the position. And while there’s an emerging crew of talented options for Scott Booker’s position group, the smart money says this is Smythe’s job to lose.

With Mike Heuerman no longer on the roster, let’s take a look at the Irish’s most tenured tight end.

 

DURHAM SMYTHE
6’4.5″, 245 lbs.
Junior, No. 80, TE

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

A long-time Texas commitment, Smythe flipped pretty late in the process, taking an official visit to South Bend in January. An early target and commitment with the Longhorns, Smythe looked at Stanford before finalizing things with Notre Dame.

 

PLAYING CAREER

Freshman Season (2013): Did not see action.

Sophomore Season (2014): Played in all 13 games for the Irish. Made one catch, a seven-yarder against Arizona State.

 

WHAT WE SAID LAST YEAR

I was right to say we should keep our expectations for Smythe’s breakout season in check. But I thought he’d have more than one catch.

It’s important to keep our expectations in line with what Smythe is right now: A young No. 2 tight end in an offense that’s going to be primarily using one tight end. That’s not to say that Smythe won’t do big things in his career at Notre Dame, but making 10 catches this year seems to be on the high side of expectations.

Of course, offensive coordinator Mike Denbrock has a soft spot for tight ends, and formationally, Smythe could be used to create mismatches or give a different look to the offense. But after looking back at the past few seasons of stats, it’s not fair to expect Smythe to work his way onto the Mackey Watch List just yet.

Still, when Koyack graduates and moves on to the next level, Smythe looks like the heir apparent. That means he’ll likely get the same national attention afforded to the Irish’s starting tight end, continuing an impressive run of Kyle Rudolph, Tyler Eifert and Troy Niklas, all at a position many didn’t expect to produce much under Kelly.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

Not every tight end Notre Dame brings in can be Kyle Rudolph or Tyler Eifert. But with three seasons of eligibility remaining, I think the upside for Smythe is somewhere between that duo and Ben Koyack.

I think the days of an every-down tight end are finished in South Bend. And I think it’s because there’s too much talent at the position, and nobody has already cemented their place in the rotation.

Smythe appears to be the best do-everything player on the roster. But with intriguing options like Alizé Jones, Nic Weishar and Tyler Luatua, there could be some specialization going on a year after Notre Dame didn’t seem to get the best out of Koyack when he was an every-down player.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

If Koyack caught 30 balls last season, I think we should put the ceiling around 20 for Smythe, especially considering the variety the Irish have at the position, not to mention the other weapons that exist in the passing game.

But maybe calibrating Smythe’s season by catches isn’t exactly the fairest way to look at things. Especially when he’ll need to prove he can be a competent blocker at the point-of-attack if he’s going to be the starter at the position.

Everything we’ve heard through spring ball and the early days of fall camp have the staff believing Smythe can handle that role. But with so many new variables in the Irish offensive attack, it’ll be up to Smythe to prove he can stay on the field, and then anything else that comes of it should be gravy.

 

THE 2015 IRISH A-to-Z
Josh Adams, RB
Josh Barajas, OLB
Nicky Baratti, S
Alex Bars, OL
Asmar Bilal, OLB
Hunter Bivin, OL
Grant Blankenship, DE
Jonathan Bonner, DE
Miles Boykin, WR
Justin Brent, WR
Greg Bryant, RB
Devin Butler, CB
Jimmy Byrne, OL
Daniel Cage, DL
Amir Carlisle, RB
Nick Coleman, DB
Te’von Coney, LB
Shaun Crawford, DB
Scott Daly, LS
Sheldon Day, DL
Michael Deeb, LB
Micah Dew-Treadway, DL
Steve Elmer, RG
Matthias Farley, DB
Nicco Fertitta, DB
Tarean Folston, RB
Will Fuller, WR
Jarrett Grace, LB
Jalen Guyton, WR
Mark Harrell, OL
Jay Hayes, DL
Mike Heuerman, TE
Kolin Hill, DE
Tristen Hoge, C
Corey Holmes, WR
Chase Hounshell, TE
Torii Hunter, Jr. WR
Alizé Jones, TE
Jarron Jones, DL
DeShone Kizer, QB
Tyler Luatua, TE
Cole Luke, CB
Nick Martin, C
Greer Martini, LB
Jacob Matuska, DL
Mike McGlinchey, OT
Colin McGovern, OL
Peter Mokwuah, DL
John Montelus, OL
Nyles Morgan, LB
Sam Mustipher, OL
Quenton Nelson, OL
Tyler Newsome, P
Romeo Okwara, DE
James Onwualu, LB
C.J. Prosise, WR/RB
Doug Randolph, LB/DE
Max Redfield, S
Corey Robinson, WR
Trevor Ruhland, OL
CJ Sanders, WR
Joe Schmidt, LB
Avery Sebastian, S
Elijah Shumate, S
Jaylon Smith, LB

Irish A-to-Z: Avery Sebastian

Mike Jensen, Avery Sebastian
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Following in the footsteps of graduate transfer Cody Riggs, Avery Sebastian comes to Notre Dame for a single season, hoping to finish off his eligibility in style. A former Cal safety, Sebastian might not find a place in the starting lineup like Riggs did, but he’ll certainly help buoy a position that lacks ideal depth.

Hailing from the same high school program that brought the Irish Isaac Rochell, Sebastian may be slightly undersized, but he’s a big hitter who’ll also immediately bring value to special teams. Let’s take a look at how he’ll fit into Notre Dame’s secondary.

 

AVERY SEBASTIAN
5’10”, 200 lbs.
Grad Student, No. 8, S

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

A four-star recruit according to Rivals, listed as the No. 6 safety in the country by ESPN. An All-State player in the state of Georgia, he was listed at No. 8 on the Rivals national list of “top 10 headhunters,” pointing to his physicality as a player.

 

PLAYING CAREER

Freshman Season (2011): Played in 12 games off the bench for Cal, a key special teams cog. Made nine total tackles, with a season-high four against Arizona State.

Sophomore Season (2012): Played in 11 games, making four starts at safety. Honorable Mention All-Pac 12 for his special teams work. Made 56 tackles, fifth on the team, adding 1.5 TFLs.

Junior Season (2013): Started the season opener at safety, making 10 tackles and an interception before a season-ending injury.

Senior Season (2014): Played in seven games with a start. Made 21 tackles on the season, including seven against Stanford.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

If you’re paying attention, the addition of Sebastian is another key piece of roster management for Notre Dame’s coaching staff, able to sell the value of an advanced degree at Notre Dame, making a single season a worthy adventure for someone who clearly cares about getting the most out of their college experience.

No, it doesn’t look like the Irish will need Sebastian the same way that they needed Cody Riggs. But if you’re looking for a position that needed veteran depth, bringing Sebastian in to compete against a slew of backups that include Nicky Baratti (another major shoulder surgery) and Drue Tranquill (coming off a late-season ACL repair), the addition makes perfect sense.

Without watching three-plus seasons of Cal football, it’s hard to know exactly what to expect out of Sebastian. But he quickly fit in this summer, and will likely make his way into the two-deep from the start.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

Consider Sebastian an insurance policy, and I’m guessing he’ll be a fixture on every run team on special teams. Don’t be surprised if he also finds a role in some third down packages, or perhaps as a in-the-box safety against run-heavy opponents.

Sebastian feels like the logical backup to Elijah Shumate, though Tranquill will certainly have something to say about that. But with a gap between the young freshmen who just hit campus and veterans like Shumate and Max Redfield, Sebastian is a perfect plug-in, earning his way to Notre Dame after handling his business at Cal.

Regardless of what happens at the next level, a degree from Berkeley and a masters from Notre Dame? Sebastian will be just fine in the future.

 

*Five-yard penalty for going out of order. 

THE 2015 IRISH A-to-Z
Josh Adams, RB
Josh Barajas, OLB
Nicky Baratti, S
Alex Bars, OL
Asmar Bilal, OLB
Hunter Bivin, OL
Grant Blankenship, DE
Jonathan Bonner, DE
Miles Boykin, WR
Justin Brent, WR
Greg Bryant, RB
Devin Butler, CB
Jimmy Byrne, OL
Daniel Cage, DL
Amir Carlisle, RB
Nick Coleman, DB
Te’von Coney, LB
Shaun Crawford, DB
Scott Daly, LS
Sheldon Day, DL
Michael Deeb, LB
Micah Dew-Treadway, DL
Steve Elmer, RG
Matthias Farley, DB
Nicco Fertitta, DB
Tarean Folston, RB
Will Fuller, WR
Jarrett Grace, LB
Jalen Guyton, WR
Mark Harrell, OL
Jay Hayes, DL
Mike Heuerman, TE
Kolin Hill, DE
Tristen Hoge, C
Corey Holmes, WR
Chase Hounshell, TE
Torii Hunter, Jr. WR
Alizé Jones, TE
Jarron Jones, DL
DeShone Kizer, QB
Tyler Luatua, TE
Cole Luke, CB
Nick Martin, C
Greer Martini, LB
Jacob Matuska, DL
Mike McGlinchey, OT
Colin McGovern, OL
Peter Mokwuah, DL
John Montelus, OL
Nyles Morgan, LB
Sam Mustipher, OL
Quenton Nelson, OL
Tyler Newsome, P
Romeo Okwara, DE
James Onwualu, LB
C.J. Prosise, WR/RB
Doug Randolph, LB/DE
Max Redfield, S
Corey Robinson, WR
Trevor Ruhland, OL
CJ Sanders, WR
Joe Schmidt, LB
Elijah Shumate, S
Jaylon Smith, LB

Irish A-to-Z: Jaylon Smith

Jaylon Smith
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Coming off of a 100-tackle sophomore season that earned him mention on the AP’s All-American second team, Jaylon Smith returns for his third season in South Bend with the expectations for greatness even higher. After spending 2014 learning how to play linebacker from the inside out, Smith now will be asked to do something he did in spurts last season: Dominate.

Notre Dame’s finest defensive athlete in a very long time, Smith is a fixture on preseason All-Star teams and magazine covers. But if he’s going to be the star that many expect, he’ll need to do more than just show himself to be an sporadically great player.

Undoubtedly talented, Smith’s career likely continues in the NFL come 2016. But before that time comes, one truly great season would help cement Notre Dame’s chances as a national title contender.

 

JAYLON SMITH
6’2.5″, 235 lbs.
Junior, No. 9, LB

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

A five-star, all-everything recruit, Smith was Notre Dame’s highest ranking defensive player of the recruiting era and second to only Jimmy Clausen, depending on the service.

A US Army All-American, Smith was the Butkus Award winner for best high school linebacker and chose Notre Dame over just about every college in the country. Most impressively, over Ohio State and Urban Meyer, where Smith’s brother was a member of the team.

 

PLAYING CAREER

Freshman Season (2013): Played and started in all 13 games, the first freshman linebacker to start an opener since Kory Minor. Smith finished third on the team in tackles and second on the team with 6.5 TFLs. The team’s defensive newcomer of the year.

Sophomore Season (2014): Second team All-American and the team’s defensive player of the year. Led the Irish in tackles (total and solo) as well as TFLs with nine, including 3.5 sacks. Made 112 tackles—including 14 against USC—in a season that saw him become a Bednarik Award semifinalist and Butkus Award finalist.

 

WHAT WE SAID LAST YEAR

Smith filled the stat-sheet, but he was no Luke Kuechly. He reached triple-digit tackles but the defense didn’t play to its potential down the stretch.

With no ceiling on Smith’s talents, a stat-line like former Boston College linebacker Luke Kuechly’s could be in order. The former Eagles tackling machine has continued that type of insane production at the next level, and might be the standard for what Smith’s capable of doing as well.

When I asked Smith about his personal goals for the season, I specifically wanted to know if he planned on making 100 tackles this season. He smiled, unwilling to take the bait. But as we saw during flashes of fall camp, Smith is no longer playing outside on the far side of the field, and it’ll be difficult for him to not make big plays.

Count on seeing him as a blitzer. Ask Tarean Folston how blocking him went. He’ll meet running backs in the hole, just like he did at practice last week when he almost sent Cam McDaniel into orbit. He’ll also occasionally be asked to drop into coverage, and even with KeiVarae Russell on the team, I still think Smith is Notre Dame’s best cover corner.

Staying healthy is all that stands in the way of a monster season. With the Irish young and inexperienced along the front seven, Smith’s going to have as much on his shoulders as he can handle.

That’s a very good thing for Notre Dame.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

Everything you could ever ask. Smith has made grown men on Twitter drool, breaking down his insane athletic ability and skill-set as they look back on the 2014 season and project him at the next level.

Smith did his best learning on the fly, far from a natural Will linebacker. But for as impressive as last season was, there’s still a feeling that Smith can do more with his talent once he harnesses the mental side of the battle.

It’s hard to say a guy that already projects to be an early first-rounder isn’t all that close to reaching his potential. But that’s what many see in Smith, especially when he’s utilized properly.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

In an era of football where playmakers are king, Smith fits in perfectly at the top of the monarchy. But if I have a complaint about the supremely talented linebacker, it’s that he didn’t do the grunt-work, bare-bones fundamentals that other less-talented players do. As a second-year rising star, it was okay to freelance sometimes. That’s what sophomores do. But being a high-ceiling playmaker and being a rock solid, assignment-correct linebacker? That’s the type of work that’ll differentiate Smith from a guy who could be a great one and a guy who already is a great one.

After Joe Schmidt went down with an injury, Smith’s productivity was a different animal. While his tackle numbers certainly didn’t suffer that badly, the defense did, and Smith’s inability to focus on doing his job well before trying to make the big play sometimes got inverted.

Part of that is learning a new position while also learning a new system. But a year into Brian VanGorder’s system, Smith’s knowledge base should be restocked, allowing him to take his world-class athleticism and turn it into top-shelf production.

We saw Manti Te’o at his best. We referenced Luke Kuechly. Smith’s a better athlete than both of them, and he’ll be used in a variety of different ways that’ll showcase those talents.

 

THE 2015 IRISH A-to-Z
Josh Adams, RB
Josh Barajas, OLB
Nicky Baratti, S
Alex Bars, OL
Asmar Bilal, OLB
Hunter Bivin, OL
Grant Blankenship, DE
Jonathan Bonner, DE
Miles Boykin, WR
Justin Brent, WR
Greg Bryant, RB
Devin Butler, CB
Jimmy Byrne, OL
Daniel Cage, DL
Amir Carlisle, RB
Nick Coleman, DB
Te’von Coney, LB
Shaun Crawford, DB
Scott Daly, LS
Sheldon Day, DL
Michael Deeb, LB
Micah Dew-Treadway, DL
Steve Elmer, RG
Matthias Farley, DB
Nicco Fertitta, DB
Tarean Folston, RB
Will Fuller, WR
Jarrett Grace, LB
Jalen Guyton, WR
Mark Harrell, OL
Jay Hayes, DL
Mike Heuerman, TE
Kolin Hill, DE
Tristen Hoge, C
Corey Holmes, WR
Chase Hounshell, TE
Torii Hunter, Jr. WR
Alizé Jones, TE
Jarron Jones, DL
DeShone Kizer, QB
Tyler Luatua, TE
Cole Luke, CB
Nick Martin, C
Greer Martini, LB
Jacob Matuska, DL
Mike McGlinchey, OT
Colin McGovern, OL
Peter Mokwuah, DL
John Montelus, OL
Nyles Morgan, LB
Sam Mustipher, OL
Quenton Nelson, OL
Tyler Newsome, P
Romeo Okwara, DE
James Onwualu, LB
C.J. Prosise, WR/RB
Doug Randolph, LB/DE
Max Redfield, S
Corey Robinson, WR
Trevor Ruhland, OL
CJ Sanders, WR
Joe Schmidt, LB
Elijah Shumate, S