Malik Zaire, Chris Brown

Mailbag: Captains, intanglibles and KeiVarae’s return


It’s a weekend edition of the mailbag. Some great questions both in the comments and on Twitter. We’ll keep reopening this throughout the weekend and into next week.

Here goes nothing:


steincj36: Who do you think will be the Captain(s) of the team? Who do you think will be the emotional leader(s) of the team?

You could probably make an argument for a dozen guys being capable captains on this team. And that’s a very good thing. In year’s past, here are some guys I’d tell you would be a lock in just about any other season:

Matthias Farley
Corey Robinson (maybe next year)
Everett Golson
Jarrett Grace
Jaylon Smith (if he returns, for sure next year)
KeiVarae Russell (not sure if suspension will let him)
Tarean Folston 
(maybe next year)
Malik Zaire (a lock for next year)

Ultimately, I think returning captains Nick Martin and Sheldon Day will keep the ‘C’ on their chest. They’re the leaders of their position groups, and certainly didn’t do anything to lose that standing.

So if we’re replacing Austin Collinsworth and Cam McDaniel, you’ll probably do it with veteran players. An obvious one is Joe Schmidt. He’s the team’s returning MVP, a charismatic leader who probably should’ve been a captain last season and a more than worthy choice.

A maybe off the radar choice is Ronnie Stanley. Two captains along the offensive line is pretty rare, but so is this offensive line group. And if there’s ever a time to reward a player for making the decision to return for his senior season, it’s a great precedent to set—especially with Jaylon Smith likely looking at a similar decision next year.

As for emotional leaders, I think KeiVarae Russell was a lock to be a captain at Notre Dame, maybe even last season before his academic suspension. I wouldn’t be surprised if he was named a captain, and even if he isn’t, he’ll be an emotional leader.

On offense, we’ll get to Zaire’s natural leadership skills shortly. But he fits the emotional leader tag perfectly. I also think Jarrett Grace and Max Redfield will take on key leadership roles.


upthera44: 1. How valuable are Zaire’s intangibles (leadership, ability to rise to the occasion on game day, etc.)? How much should they be factored into the calculus for picking the starter?

Up until I saw Zaire handle the press after the USC game last year, I’d have called his intangibles (and really, intangibles in general) incredibly overrated. But seeing his charisma firsthand and watching him lift a team that was playing for nothing in the second half with effort, motivation and a true winner’s will, I became a believer.

(Candidly, before that game, I thought there was a better chance that we’d never see Zaire as a starter than him taking over the offense.)

Add to that the heart, effort and willpower he put into the LSU victory—and the genuine emotional outburst that came after the victory—I think his elite leadership abilities are a very real factor that the coaching staff is taking into consideration.

Of course, Zaire can be a leader playing a role on the team, even if it isn’t the starting quarterback. And part of the calculus is certainly figuring out how Zaire can lead while also allowing Golson to play a key role in this offense, a still-being-determined formula that’ll truly come into focus come June, when Golson officially commits to being a part of this football team (if not sooner).

But if Golson transfers, this will very quickly be Zaire’s offense. And the team will certainly rally around a pitch-perfect leader who will have plenty of success.



tampabayirish: It has been announced that San Diego (a great choice) is the likely destination for the 2018 Navy-Notre Dame game. Any word on the location of the 2016 Navy-Notre Dame game?

The report mentioned both the 2016 and 2018 game, and sign me up for either or both. With the Navy’s footprint in the San Diego area and another Southern California game for the Irish (Notre Dame will end the 2016 and 2018 seasons at USC), both schools would have some excitement for that game.

One suggestion: Get it out of that dump Qualcomm Stadium and put it in Petco Park. A Saturday at one of America’s finest venues and in the Gaslamp District would be a great day.


@irishpatient: Russell has a long layoff, assuming he’s back, what do we know about his conditioning and understanding of the new defense?

I take it you aren’t following Russell on Instagram? He’s been posting his workout photos from basically the start of his suspension. So if you’re worried about him being in shape, I’ll give you a greatest hits below.

As for his understanding of the new defense, Russell was already deep into the system last August and spent the spring learning it as well, tutoring roommate Nick Watkins on the finer points, when he was pulled from the team. He’s been in contact with the team and coaching staff. And it even sounds like the plan is for Russell to be a lockdown cornerback on the opponents best receiver, pairing with Cole Luke to be a great starting duo.






Post-spring stock report: Running Backs

Grge Bryant, Austin Larkin

(The first of a multi-part series looking at the positional depth chart coming out of spring practice.)


Entering spring practice, the running back position held a unique spot on Notre Dame’s roster. No spot was thinner—with just juniors Tarean Folston and Greg Bryant scholarship players. Yet the duo was also a somewhat proven commodity, a rarity on a roster that relied on a plethora of first-year contributors in 2014.

When Brian Kelly announced C.J. Prosise was cross-training with the running backs, many assumed it was a contingency plan, or at the very least a bridge to the summer when Josh Adams and Dexter Williams hit campus. But with new running backs coach Autry Denson working with the trio, the Irish’s most explosive slot receiver infused that speed into the backfield, turning into a potential game-breaker at a position many felt was already strong.

Let’s look at the post-spring depth chart and check the trends from this spring.




1. Tarean Folston, Jr. (5-9.5/214)
2. Greg Bryant, Jr.* (5-10/205)
or C.J. Prosise, Sr.* (6-.5/220)

*Denotes fifth-year of eligibility



C.J. Prosise: Prosise was the talk of the offense, impressing Brian Kelly with his speed and natural running back instincts. Whether it was a 70-yard touchdown run in the team’s biggest scrimmage or leading the Irish in rushing during the Blue-Gold game, Prosise’s emergence has given Notre Dame another offensive weapon and perhaps its most versatile.

What that means come next fall remains to be seen. Kelly talked about Prosise putting up a legitimate battle for the starting job, while also saying he thought he could carve out 10 carries a game for him. Mike Denbrock called him one of the team’s best players.

But Prosise also has a key role as a slot receiver, a position where he led the Irish in yards per catch last year. So a standout spring might not translate to a fall emergence at running back. But wherever he plays, it’s likely going to be a big 2015 for Prosise.



Greg Bryant: It’s hard to call this a bad spring by Bryant, but it’s fair to say that this downgrade is the result of missing on his earnings potential. Put simply, all the talk about Prosise overshadowed anything Bryant did—and I’m including an impressive performance in the Blue-Gold game.

But maybe that’s a good thing. After entering as a freshman will ridiculous expectations, Bryant had a huge spring game last year and once again looked poised to erupt as a redshirt freshman. While he led Irish running backs with a 5.4 yards per carry average, he suffered through a midseason slump before rebounding in garbage time against USC and with a big punt return against Louisville.

Bryant has plenty of talent. He’s learning to play within the confines of the system as well. With great hands, special teams ability and a strong offensive line, there’s no reason to think a big season can’t be just around the corner.



Tarean Folston: Brian Kelly knows what he has in Tarean Folston. And that’s a running back who should be poised for a monster season in 2015. While he might not be the fastest or the flashiest, Folston is certainly the smoothest and most natural runner we’ve seen in the Irish backfield for quite some time.

Bulking up to 214 pounds this spring, Folston should be able to move the pile between the tackles, serving as a short-yardage runner when Cam McDaniel inexplicably took those carries last season. It should also make it easier for the Irish to ride Folston as a running option, a spot where he’s thrived when he’s been given enough opportunities.

Folston’s 2014 season saw him average more than five yards a carry for the second season in a row (he also averaged over 10 yards a catch). After averaging less than 10 carries a game through the first five weeks of the season, Folston took over as the team’s primary back and watched his productivity explode.

There’s no reason to wait in 2015. While Prosise and Bryant certainly deserve a significant role in the rotation, Folston is the Irish’s leading man at running back.



Buy. It’s hard to look at this position—especially with the addition of Williams and Adams this summer—as anything but really talented. Ultimately, it’s going to come down to the production of guys like Bryant and Prosise to make this group excel. But that’s frankly expected, especially with the perceived commitment to running the football behind a very good offensive line.

While the guy we heard the most about was a receiver just a few months ago, he solidified a group that should do big things next season.