Tag: 25-21

Malik Zaire

Counting down the Irish: 25-21


It’s time for the first installment of this year’s Top 25. As we count by five from the top of the list to the bottom, we’ll get our first peek at some of the young talent that’s going to be tasked with carrying the Irish forward this season.

Of the five players we’re covering today, only one seems to be a lock in the Irish’s opening day lineup. And his route there is perhaps the most unlikely of any on the roster. From a recruiting profile perspective, none of the five were seen as “elite” recruits, after last year’s 25-21 were all blue-chippers with sky-high expectations.

Let’s start the festivities by rolling out our 2014 rankings.




source: Getty Images
Will Fuller against Air Force

25. Will Fuller (WR, Soph.): After serving as Notre Dame’s designated deep threat in 2013, Fuller should see some diversity in his offensive role this season, a big reason why I think he’s primed to be one of the team’s breakout stars in 2014.

Fuller has perhaps the best top-end speed on the roster, as his 26.7 yards per catch average made evident. But he’s also got a great set of hands, is a better than you’d expect route runner, and is capable of playing in the TJ Jones mold, a versatile receiver who can do a lot more than we’ve seen.

While the depth chart at receiver is deep, Fuller is the type of player that can move inside and out, a situational weapon that Brian Kelly could use to break open the passing game, especially in one-on-one coverage. That’s why I predicted a 1,000 season out of Fuller, and rated him higher than any of the other panelists.

Highest Ranking: 14th. Lowest Ranking: Unranked (Six ballots).


source:  24. Joe Schmidt (LB, Sr.): While truly great players can transcend scheme, senior linebacker Joe Schmidt was perhaps the largest beneficiary of the defensive change from Bob Diaco to Brian VanGorder.

Schmidt, who at a shade above 6-foot and 235 pounds, didn’t have the bulk or length to play on the inside of a 3-4 defense. But he’s the starting middle linebacker for the Irish in VanGorder’s scheme, a tremendous rise after starting his career as a recruited walk-on and part-time special teams performer.

Of course, Schmidt’s opportunity came because of an injury to Jarrett Grace and depth chart issues. But after an impressive spring, Schmidt looks poised to be a very productive part of the Irish defense. A good athlete with solid sideline-to-sideline speed, Schmidt’s instincts and ability in space were apparent last season against USC, when the unsung linebacker made a huge play to break up a critical pass late in the game to seal a victory against the Trojans.

The walk-on tag will likely hang on Schmidt, an easy narrative for an undersized player who turned down other opportunities to chase a scholarship at Notre Dame. And entering his senior season, he’s likely to be one of the Irish’s most productive players. It might not be Rudy, but Schmidt’s story is mighty good, too.

Highest Ranking: 12th. Lowest Ranking: Unranked (Two ballots).


23. Chris Brown (WR, Jr.): Brown disappeared for most of his sophomore season until playing his best football in the Pinstripe Bowl, a breakthrough for a receiver who shows flashes of big play potential, but struggled to find productivity in his first two seasons.

New York Post

Brown produced one of the biggest plays of 2012, when he connected with Everett Golson for a 50-yard bomb against Oklahoma. But after the deep threat role went to Will Fuller in 2013, Brown’s four starts and 13 appearances only produced 15 catches, with five coming in the bowl game, after putting up nine catches in the season’s first three games.

But if there was a receiver who consistently earned praise this spring it was Brown, with the junior taking on a leadership role with DaVaris Daniels exiled for the semester after academic deficiencies. Brian Kelly continued that praise for Brown last week after seeing his progress this summer.

At his best, Brown’s an explosive athlete who was an elite track star at the high school level and a junior national team member in 2011. He’s long at almost 6-foot-2, and has great leaping ability. Past the midpoint of his college career, the time is now for Brown to make his move, especially with talented young players surrounding him.

Highest Ranking: 16th. Lowest Ranking: Unranked (One ballot).

Jarrett Grace

22. Jarrett Grace (LB, Sr.): That Grace finds himself on this list is a product of a few panelists believing that the senior linebacker can put the crippling leg injury he suffered last season behind him. If he can, there’s no reason to believe Grace can’t be a defensive leader for the Irish. But even with positive updates coming from Brian Kelly as camp opened, Grace is still weeks away from being ready to play football, and he barely participating in any drill work on Monday.

While a long-term prognosis on Grace’s recovery sounds better than it’s ever been, the reality of the situation is that Grace still isn’t a year removed from breaking his fibula in multiple places, an injury so destructive that he stayed behind in Dallas for several days and had multiple surgical procedures, including one this spring, to help the healing.

Grace was once believed to be the heir apparent to Manti Te’o, given the first opportunity to step into Te’o’s spot at the Mike linebacker last season. But some rookie moments early in the season quickly tampered those expectations. Yet Grace was rounding into form at the time of his injury, the Irish’s leading tackler at the time of his injury.

Getting anything out of Grace in 2014 would be a bonus. But his placement in this list shows you the respect he’s earned from those that have watched him during his career in South Bend.

Highest Ranking: 12th. Lowest Ranking: Unranked (Six ballots).


21. Malik Zaire (QB, Soph.): After sitting through a difficult redshirt season, Zaire burst out of the gates during spring practice, making headlines when he said he fully expected to be the starter when Notre Dame played Rice on August 30th. That Zaire still has a chance to make that happen says quite a bit about the abilities (not to mention the confidence) that the exciting sophomore possesses.

After arriving relatively late on the recruiting scene, Zaire made waves at the Elite 11 camp, where he was one of the more impressive quarterbacks in attendance. As an option trigger man for most of his high school career, Zaire’s development as a passer has been recent, but he’s done a very good job in the limited reps we’ve seen from him.

Zaire out-played Golson in the spring game (though he faced a more basic defensive attack), and Brian Kelly says he plays his best football when the stage is biggest. That’s easy to say when it’s a Blue-Gold game, and quite another thing when it’s an opponent wearing a different jersey.

At his best, Zaire is a more dynamic running threat than Golson and his sturdier build makes him more capable as an option quarterback who will keep defenses guessing. While the reality of the situation will likely keep Zaire playing behind Golson for two more seasons, expect to see the young quarterback on the field early and often this season, with specialty packages designed to get the next man in a little experience.

Highest Ranking: 16th. Lowest Ranking: Unranked (Three ballots).


The selection committee for the 2014 ND Top 25:

Pete Sampson, Irish Illustrated (@NDatRivals)
Tyler James, South Bend Tribune (@TJamesNDI)
Chris Hine, Chicago Tribune (@ChristopherHine)
Team OFD, One Foot Down (@OneFootDown)
Ryan Ritter, Her Loyal Sons (@HLS_NDTex)
JJ Stankevitz, CSN Chicago (@JJStankevitz)
John Walters, Medium Happy (@JDubs88)
John Vannie, ND Nation
Keith Arnold, NBC Sports (@KeithArnold)

Counting down the Irish: 25-21

Matt Cashore

As we look at the first installment of our annual Top 25 list, it’s a reminder that Brian Kelly knows how to recruit.

While we’ve trudged through this topic more than once, one of the biggest concerns after Kelly’s hiring was his ability to recruit against the power programs in college football. Succeeding only at lower-profile schools, there was a strong narrative established by those that weren”t enthusiastic about the hire that Kelly and his hand-picked staff lacked the ability to battle the big boys of college football.

Nothing obliterates that fallacy like the first five names on our list. Each of these players was a blue-chip recruit, one of the top players at not just their respective position, but in the country. While the group is high on promise, these players haven’t yet made an impact, though three can be excused — they haven’t seen the field yet.

Let’s walk through the first five entries in our rankings:


25. Max Redfield (S, Fr.) At a position that’s seen a ton of promising young talent infused into the depth chart, Redfield might be the best prospect to hit campus at his position since Tommy Zbikowski. (To be fair, Redfield is probably a better prospect than Tommy Z.)

The Southern California native comes to campus with high expectations, though how he’ll work into a fairly crowded depth chart at safety is anyone’s guess. News that the Irish coaching staff was looking at Redfield spending some time on the offensive side of the ball as well made some waves, but reminds you of the safety’s explosive athleticism and great size.

Last year, KeiVarae Russell became a true freshman starter in the secondary. While the move was more out of necessity, Redfield has the potential and ability, though playing safety in Bob Diaco’s defense requires a good mix of athleticism and mastery of defensive concepts.

Highest Ranking: 14th. Lowest Ranking: Unranked (four ballots)

24. Elijah Shumate (S, Soph.) One player likely standing in the way of Redfield seeing significant playing time is Shumate. A season after shifting and playing well at cornerback and defending slot receivers, Shumate is moving back to his natural safety position, where the Irish think they have a standout athlete that’s ready to make an impact.

This spring Shumate started opposite Farley, manning the field side of the defense. While that was partially a product of Nicky Baratti recovering from surgery, Shumate is the prototype athlete the Irish want at the back of their defense, with the six-foot, 213-pounder an impressive specimen.

After appearing in all thirteen games during his freshman season, Shumate showed plenty of cover skills, breaking up three passes on the year. Brian Kelly all but stated that Shumate is the guy expected to start this fall. After playing a bit role in the Irish defense as a freshman, he’ll be expected to do much more in his second season.

Highest Ranking: 16th. Lowest Ranking: Unranked (one ballot).

23. Jaylon Smith (OLB, Fr.) By just about every measure, Smith was one of the top five recruits in the country, the highest profile defensive player signed by Notre Dame in the modern recruiting era. Projected to play outside linebacker, the biggest question mark isn’t necessarily if Smith will help the Irish, but how.

Among the few off-the-record reports coming from voluntary summer workouts is Smith’s impressive work, where the slightly undersized linebacker has reportedly pushed his weight to the 230-pound range. That’s plenty big enough for a traditional 4-3 outside linebacker, but still a little slight in the Irish’s defensive structure.

That said, Smith’s arrival in South Bend gives Bob Diaco a Ferrari that he’ll all but need to take out of the garage. Whether that means finding snaps for the freshman in place of Danny Spond at the field-side linebacker position, as a pass rush specialist with his hand on the ground, or as a cover-man, right now, we’ve heard that Smith can do it all. Now, living up to the considerable hype will be Smith’s biggest task.

Highest Ranking: 12th. Lowest Ranking: Unranked (one ballot).

22. Ishaq Williams (OLB/DE, Jr.) Like the rest of this group, Williams was a five-star recruit with elite skills. Yet in his third year in the program, the Irish coaching staff (not to mention the fanbase) is still waiting for the lightbulb to go on for the talented edge player.

At a shade over 6-foot-5 and 261-pounds, Williams is the prototype Cat linebacker for Bob Diaco’s defense. Yet finding his way onto the field has been a challenge, mostly because he’s been stuck behind Prince Shembo, but also because it’s been a fairly steep learning curve for Williams.

There’s no doubt that Williams is one of the team’s most talented players, though he hasn’t been able to unleash those skills and become the dominant pass rusher and edge player that we’re still waiting to see. After a sophomore season that saw Williams see mostly situational work in all 13 games, the future is now for one of the front seven’s most versatile athletes.

Highest Ranking: 18th. Lowest Ranking: Unranked (one ballot).

21. Greg Bryant (RB, Fr.) Of all the talented newcomers on our list, Bryant is the highest rated true freshman. That’s likely a product not just of his touted recruiting ranking or his college-ready physique, but also the realities of the running back depth chart.

Bryant is the Irish’s most highly sought after offensive recruit since Jimmy Clausen, giving you an idea of the expectations heaped on the freshman back. And at a position that’s as close to plug and play as can be, if the recruiting services are correct with their evaluations, Bryant could very quickly make himself a key part of the Irish’s ground game.

Not the biggest, fastest, or strongest running back, Bryant is expected to be a super-charged Theo Riddick. That’d make Irish fans plenty happy, with Bryant’s versatility making him the most utilized weapon in last season’s offensive attack. Still, freshmen haven’t walked onto campus and made a huge impact under Kelly, so keeping expectations in check might be important.

Highest Ranking: 11th. Lowest Ranking: Unranked (two ballots).


Just Missing the Cut: K/P Kyle Brindza, OT Ronnie Stanley, OLB Romeo Okwara, OT Steve Elmer.

Counting down the Irish: 25-21

Carlo Calabrese

As we kick off our 2011 Irish Top 25, let’s get some things out of the way quickly. This is just a list, not some objective evaluation process. Some guys I had ranked much higher than others. (It worked the other way as well.) Still, what you’ll find here is a pretty good composite projected ranking for players on the 2011 Irish roster.

Of course, lists like this are subjective by definition. I kept the qualifications light and let our panel of “experts” use their own methodology.

Once again, here is our esteemed group of panelists:

Frank Vitovitch of UHND.com
DomerMQ of HerLoyalSons.com
Eric Murtaugh of OneFootDown.com
Matt Mattare of WeNeverGradute.com
Matt & CW of RakesofMallow.com


25. Taylor Dever (OT, Sr.): Dever won the right tackle job last year after seeing limited minutes as a junior and sophomore. The fifth-year senior should anchor the position he started ten games at, missing time with a hamstring injury in the heart of the season. You didn’t hear Dever’s name much last season, a good thing for a right tackle.

Highest ranking: 16th. Lowest ranking: Unranked (3 times)

24. Chris Watt (OG, Jr.): Watt is the presumed replacement for Chris Stewart, and is versatile enough to slide in at center if needed. After redshirting his freshman season, Watt played in all 13 games last season for the Irish, providing depth behind Stewart.

Highest ranking: 12th. Lowest ranking: Unranked (4 times)

23. Zeke Motta (S, Jr.): Thrown into action after an early season injury to Jamoris Slaughter, Motta learned on his feet, playing in all 13 games and starting eight opposite Harrison Smith. His improvement was evident as the season went on, and the rising junior will battle Slaughter for the job across from Smith.

Highest ranking: 19th. Lowest ranking: Unranked (2 times)

22. Aaron Lynch (DE, Fr.): One of the most highly anticipated defensive newcomers in years, Lynch lit the Blue-Gold game on fire with a dynamic performance. While he’ll probably only see the field on passing downs, Lynch has all the potential in the world.

Highest ranking: 16th. Lowest ranking: Unranked (2 times)

21. Carlo Calabrese (LB, Jr.): After sitting out his freshman season, Calabrese won the inside linebacker job opposite Manti Te’o, and started eight games before a hamstring injury took him out. He finished fifth on the team in tackles, sixth in TFLs, and fourth in sacks. He’ll compete for a starting job again this fall.

Highest ranking: 17th. Lowest ranking: 24th.


After looking at the composite list, here are a few questions I had for the panel. I’ll highlight a few answers that I found interesting.

Who did you have sitting at No. 26? Are you reconsidering after looking at everybody else’s lists?

DomerMQ @HerLoyalSons — Crist. had Crist at #26. Or maybe 40th. Or maybe lower. Wherever I had him, he wasn’t 1-25. And I’m actually feeling pretty good about it, having stolen a look at everyone’s 1-25. It went about the way I thought it would.  And I understand the points of view of the other fine members of this council, but, while this team may not be full of 1st-round talent from 1-25, it’s full of a nice bit of depth, and I just couldn’t see clear to move Crist into the top 25 given he was the QB who started in the latest loss to Navy.

Matt @WeNeverGraduate — I was tempted to stick Robby Toma in there somewhere because I think he’s going to be the guy who emerges as the most productive fourth wideout. Sean Cwynar also got some consideration thanks to his rock solid performance filling in for Ian Williams when the senior went down.

Which one of these guys has the highest upside for the season?

Eric @OneFootDown — Out of the guys from the 21-25 range it is most obviously Aaron Lynch, who could jump as many as a dozen spots or more if we were to do this ranking system at the end of the 2011 season. I also think Motta is a good bet to move up a decent amount as well.

Matt @WeNeverGraduate — I’ll tap Zeke Motta for this question. Motta improved by leaps and bounds throughout last season as he logged more and more minutes thanks to Jamoris Slaughter’s injury. He’s a freak athlete and he finally seems to be grasping the position.

Any name you think comes in too low here? Too high?

Frank @UHND — Definitely think Lynch is too low.  I know Kelly tried to downplay Lynch’s Blue-Gold game performance, but it was hard not to be impressed.  With the off-season conditioning and fall camp under his belt, I think Lynch is going to make a big impact from day 1.  No one here really looks too high.  Of the three players here I didn’t have in my rankings – Motta, Watt, and Dever – all of them were right outside of my rankings and I considered all of them right on the cusp so hard to argue with any of them.

CW&MB @RakesofMallow — I cannot shake the images of Zeka Motta’s miserable tackling angles in the 2010 Blue-Gold Game.  Even our walk-on running backs were beating him to the edge because of his lack of basic geometrical knowledge.  He played well enough during the season, but he’s the one guy in this group that I’m not sold on.

What do you think a realistic expectation is for someone that’s judged to be between the 21st and 25th best player on the Irish roster?

Frank @UHND — There are 24 starters on a team (including the kicker and punter) so any player within the top 25 should either be a solid starter or excel at a niche such as kick/punt returning, situational pass rushing, etc.  Of these five players, I expect Jones, Motta, Watt, and Calabrese all to be solid starters and in the case of Jones, Watt, and Motta I think they have the potential to be more than solid.  A guy like Lynch might not start but I fully expect him to be a pass rush specialist that makes several big plays throughout the season.


I’m really surprised that Sean Cwynar isn’t listed in the Top 25. In fact, I think if there’s anything I’m certain of, Sean Cwynar is one of the best 25 football players on Notre Dame’s roster. It isn’t a coincidence that the defense not only didn’t miss a beat when Ian Williams went down, but it actually improved. I’m not saying Cwynar was the key to the renaissance, but he’s going to be a very good player on the 2011 Irish. I also had Danny Spond at No. 25, and while I can understand why people haven’t started drinking the Kool-Aid yet, I wouldn’t be surprised if Spond turns into a Chad Greenway type of athlete.

Obviously, Aaron Lynch is the guy that could immediately become a top-ten player on this roster or he’ll be a guy that has some growing pains, likely due to the incredible expectations he helped heap on himself. I have a feeling he’ll be slowly eased into the process, but will make his presence felt early and often in pass-rushing downs. But don’t forget Stephon Tuitt, who didn’t enroll early, but is physically ready to play September 3rd.

Lastly, Carlo Calabrese is at an interesting inflection point. His injury derailed expectations after an impressive redshirt freshman campaign. We’ll find out if he’s ready to become an impact linebacker or a guy that makes plays because he’s lined up next to Manti Te’o.