Tag: Andrew Hendrix

BYU v Notre Dame

Irish draft hopefuls audition at ND Pro Day


Former Irish football players had their chance to audition for future employers today in South Bend at the Notre Dame Pro Day. It was a reunion of sorts as players from all over worked out inside the Gug under the watchful eyes of NFL scouts.

With Notre Dame only losing starters Ben Koyack, Cody Riggs and Kyle Brindza to the NFL, it’s not expected to be a big year for the Irish in the draft. But also returning to campus to audution were former captain Cam McDaniel, DaVaris Daniels, Jake Golic, Andrew Hendrix, Ethan Johnson, Kendall Moore, Justin Utupo and Alex Welch.

Daniels and Moore are back on campus even after last season’s suspension. They’re joined by Miami RedHawks Hendrix and Welch, who played out their eligibility under former offensive coordinator Chuck Martin.

Golic returned to campus after playing at Cincinnati. Johnson is looking to return to the NFL after being a part of the concussion class action lawsuit and a cup of coffee with the Kansas City Chiefs.

Let’s take to social media to get you some results:

Here’s an update on Cody Riggs, who was a surprise to be not among the invites to the combine in Indianapolis, but certainly helped his draft stock by running as fast as you’d have expected.

It appears that Riggs tweaked a hamstring later in the workout, but not before taking a slo-mo leap in the broad jump:


Ben Koyack, who was invited to Indianapolis, but didn’t run the 40-yard dash there, did so in South Bend. Per SID Michael Bertsch, Koyack ran right around a 4.7, with the fastest time listed at 4.68.

Koyack was at the Senior Bowl and Combine and is likely to be the first former Irish player off the draft board, though maybe not as early as previous Notre Dame tight ends.


Also back on campus is McDaniel, who is days away from becoming a father. A fringe candidate to make a roster, McDaniel showed some versatility—needed if he’s going to be a special teams performer on Sundays.


Kyle Brindza did a nice job updating us on his Pro Day. Here’s the former Irish kicker on his afternoon, where he showed off epic strongman skills in addition to a big leg on kickoffs.


In a parallel universe, DaVaris Daniels was catching passes from Andrew Hendrix. The Elkhart Truth’s Rachel Terlep even has proof.

Daniels spoke with media at the event, doing his best to put his suspension and inability to return to South Bend into context.

“It’s a difficult situation,” Daniels acknowledged to The Observer‘s Mike Monaco. “I don’t hold any grudges. I just don’t really like thinking about the situation… it is what it is. At this point, I’m ready for the NFL. That’s my focus.”

Daniels estimates he’s got a little over two semesters left of work to complete before earning his Notre Dame degree. He said all the right things about moving forward and hopefully finishing up his course work, while also taking the high road about the frustrating time where all five suspended athletes waited to hear their fate.

Most importantly for Daniels, at least when it comes to his immediate employment future, is getting his speed and explosiveness back. Various reports had Daniels breaking into the 4.5-range on his 40, a critical threshold for him.


If you’re looking for good news out of South Bend, defensive end Ishaq Williams—currently in football and academic purgatory—was on hand watching the festivities. Williams didn’t speak to any media but sat with his teammates for the festivities, though what to make of that isn’t clear.

While scholarship numbers are tight, Williams could be a great addition to a defensive front that’s looking for more bulk, and it’d allow him to finish his Notre Dame degree after a two semester exile.

Hendrix, Kiel ready to move into starting roles

Andrew Hendrix Stanford

While only two quarterbacks remain on Brian Kelly’s scholarship depth chart, two departed signal-callers are on their way to taking over starting jobs at other programs. Last weekend, former Irish quarterback Andrew Hendrix capped off a strong spring with a nice performance for Chuck Martin’s Miami RedHawks.

Hendrix, who earned his degree from Notre Dame and will play out his eligibility in Oxford, completed 16 of 23 passes for 243 yards and a touchdown. The Cincinnati native returns to his home state and continues with his former Irish offensive coordinator, who was his typical self when asked if Hendrix was set to be named the starting quarterback.

“There’s no naming,” Martin said. “You spend five minutes out there and he’s clearly our No. 1 quarterback. Everyone knows it. For the public, you can name him if you want. But everybody on the team knows who the No. 1 quarterback is.”

Winning the starting job might not be the most enviable spot on the baron Miami roster. After finishing last season winless and hardly competitive, Martin is rebuilding the program from the foundation. And he’ll have three former Irish players to help him in this first season, with Lo Wood and Alex Welch joining Hendrix in Oxford.

After the spring scrimmage, Hendrix talked about the experience playing under Martin and how that should help expedite the rebuilding process.

“After two years of playing in this offense, I think I know the ins and outs,” Hendrix said. “And that’s helped me bring the other guys along. And when you have other veterans out here like myself,  Lo Wood, even Alex Welch, it really helps to break down the learning curve and get us where we want to be.”

Meanwhile, 45 minutes away another former Irish quarterback is ready for his star turn. Last month, Gunner Kiel supplied hope for the future of Cincinnati football when he completed 17 of 22 throws for 300 yards in the Bearcats spring game. Running Tommy Tuberville’s No. 1 offense in the first half, Kiel looked sharp as he stretched the field with some vertical throws.

After the offense received a public scolding from Tuberville, Kiel’s performance seemed to lock in his role as the team’s starter, though injured quarterback Munchie Legaux could be back and healthy before the start of the season.

After the game, Kiel had the sound of a guy that was ready to step into the role of starting quarterback.

“I want to play perfect every game,” Kiel said. “I came out here with a chip on my shoulder to get better and compete have fun and play fast because that’s what we are good at. So it was fun. I definitely enjoyed my time and I’m ready for the season to begin.”

If Irish fans are looking for a fun Saturday on the Irish’s off weekend in late September, tune in to Miami vs. Cincinnati, where Hendrix and Kiel will face-off at Paul Brown Stadium.



Last look back: Quarterback

Rees USC

Nobody expects Irish fans to write a final love letter to Tommy Rees. But the senior quarterback, who played significant minutes in all four of Brian Kelly’s seasons in South Bend, is the quarterback of record for the Kelly era. None of that is Rees’s fault. And in some ways, it’s not really Kelly’s fault either.

Before we dig into Rees’ year that was, let’s take a look back at the period that allowed these four seasons to create the Tommy Rees era. To do that, we need to take a look back at the decade, and closer examine the decisions that brought the unlikely partnership of quarterback and coach together.

Consider this a refresher timeline of the decade that was at the quarterback position.

2003 — Even though Carlyle Holiday was coming off a solid season where he piloted the Irish to a 10-win season at quarterback, Brady Quinn took over the job after three games. Quinn played through some bumps and bruises, but Tyrone Willingham and his staff went all in on Quinn.

2003 QB Depth Chart
Brady Quinn, Fr.
Carlyle Holiday, Sr.
Pat Dillingham, Jr.

Though Quinn was locked into the starting job, the depth chart was precariously thin, and the Irish staff signed two quarterbacks. Unfortunately both quarterbacks were two-star prospects, with Darrin Bragg and David Wolke signing in February.

2004 — It was Quinn’s offense and while he improved, the Irish didn’t. Even though Quinn threw for 17 touchdowns and 10 interceptions as a sophomore, after starting 5-2, the Irish faltered down the stretch, leading to the firing of Willingham after three seasons.

2004 QB Depth Chart
Brady Quinn, Soph.
Pat Dillingham, Sr.
Carlyle Holiday, Sr. (WR)
David Wolke, Fr.
Darrin Bragg, Fr.

While Charlie Weis stayed on to coach the Patriots during their Super Bowl run, he did keep the commitment of Evan Sharpley, a three-star quarterback that committed to Willingham in the summer.

2005 — It was Quinn or bust at quarterback for the Irish and the junior delivered a breakthrough season as the Irish offense exploded in Charlie Weis’ first season. But the scoring bonanza hide some of the depth chart issues, as Bragg had already been transitioned to wide receiver.

2005 QB Depth Chart
Brady Quinn, Jr.
David Wolke, Soph.
Evan Sharpley, Fr.

To remedy that problem, Weis brought in two quarterbacks. Pennsylvania quarterback Zach Frazer committed in April, while Demetrius Jones joined the class in August. Both were highly sought after players, with Jones the No. 2 dual-threat QB in the country, according to Rivals.com.

2006 — Brady Quinn put an impressive cap on his Irish career with another stellar season, throwing 37 touchdown passes against just seven interceptions. While the Irish didn’t ultimately play up to their lofty preseason status and lost ugly in their final two games to USC and LSU, Weis’ status as a QB guru was at its all time high.

2006 QB Depth Chart
Brady Quinn, Sr.
Evan Sharpley, Soph.
Zach Frazer, Fr.
Demetrius Jones, Fr.

No bigger fish in the pond than Jimmy Clausen. If you want a walk down memory lane, here you go:


2007 — And then it all went wrong. The bottom fell out for Weis, and the Irish went from back-to-back BCS runs to one of the worst teams in school history. Life after Brady Quinn was a veritable mess.

Zach Frazer, upon being named the No. 4 quarterback on the depth chart, decided to transfer. Jones went from opening weekend quarterback to not boarding the bus to Michigan. And just like that, Weis — just like Willingham had done — hit a hard reboot on the depth chart and handed the offense over to Clausen.

2007 QB Depth Chart
Demetrius Jones, So.
Evan Sharpley, Jr.
Jimmy Clausen, Fr.
Zach Frazer, So.

It still felt like reload, not rebuild for Weis, with the 2008 recruiting class ranked the No. 1 in the country by many publications.  That group was anchored by Dayne Crist, another five-star Southern California quarterback.

2008 — Just like Brady Quinn, Clausen improved in his sophomore season, but not enough to keep the Irish from struggling. A hot start ended with a screeching halt, and an ugly November was capped off with a brutal performance against USC.

2008 QB Depth Chart
Jimmy Clausen, So.
Evan Sharpley, Sr.
Dayne Crist, Fr.

If you’re looking for an example of questionable roster management, Notre Dame didn’t sign a quarterback in 2009, but did end up signing three specialists, long-snapper Jordan Cowart, punter Ben Turk and kicker Nick Tausch. That’s probably a product of seeing Clausen and Crist as the present and future, but it put the Irish in a precarious situation, especially if Clausen was intent on leaving after three seasons.

2009 — Even though the offense continued to be prolific, the defense couldn’t stop teams and the Irish kept losing. Another November swoon and a string of close losses cost Charlie Weis his job. With Weis gone, Clausen followed. So did Golden Tate, the Biletnikoff Winner. Neither went in the first round.

2009 QB Depth Chart
Jimmy Clausen, Jr.
Dayne Crist, Soph.
Evan Sharpley, Sr.*
Nate Montana, Jr. (Played at Pasadena Junior College)

When Kelly took over the roster, the first thing he noticed was a quarterback position that had Dayne Crist down for the season with a torn ACL, a graduated fifth-year senior and a walk-on son of a Notre Dame legend. You can’t blame him for knowing he needed to go out and get some bodies.

Kelly inherited Tommy Rees and Andrew Hendrix, but was seeking out a third quarterback. That he signed Luke Massa, a good athlete with college basketball options — and a teammate of touted left tackle prospect Matt James — made a ton of sense.

2010 — With Dayne Crist or bust at quarterback, Kelly had a first year starter with a five-star pedigree playing in a new system. He also had little safety net, with three freshmen breaking in and Nate Montana back from getting just limited reps in Juco football.

2010 QB Depth Chart
Dayne Crist, Jr.
Tommy Rees, Fr.
Nate Montana, Jr.
Luke Massa, Fr.

Crist’s knee injury ended up being the perfect storm. But Rees weathered it, almost amazingly leading the Irish to a late season winning streak after looking like a team that might not even qualify for a bowl game.


We all know what happened after that, but it’s worth recapping. Rees and Crist battled heading into the 2011 season, with Crist laying an egg in the first half against USF and throwing the depth chart into chaos. To Crist’s credit, he stuck things out, and while Rees turned the ball over too much, the Irish offense was plenty explosive.

But Kelly continued to bring in quarterbacks, finding Everett Golson even after a three-man class and Gunner Kiel after that. That both weren’t on the roster last season gives you an idea of the twists and turns of recruiting college quarterbacks, but it should also give you some appreciation for the quarterback that could withstand it all.


GP-GS Effic. Cmp-Att-Int Pct. Yards TD Long Avg/G
Tommy Rees 13-13 135.4 224-414-13 54.1 3,257 27 82 250.5
Andrew Hendrix 8-0 27.9 2-14-0 14.3 56 0 47 7



Bronze: Rees vs. Michigan State.

Don’t laugh. The numbers stink, a 41 percent completion percentage and just 142 yards and 14 of 34 passing. But Rees kept throwing it down field, and kept it out of the Spartans’ hands. That ended up being rather tough last season and the victory over Michigan State might be one of the more underrated performances and game plans that Brian Kelly has put together.

Silver: Rees vs. USC 

It was shaping up to be quite a day for Rees, who had struggled at times against the Trojans. But while a massive hit took him from the game, Rees was able to complete 14 of 21 passes for 166 and two touchdowns. He moved the Irish at tempo, connected on red zone opportunities and was just about in a position to put up some numbers when he wrenched his neck and the Andrew Hendrix experience went south.

Gold: Rees vs. Air Force

Any time you complete five touchdown passes and roll a team by 35 points you’ve done a nice job. Rees’ QBR was a ridiculous 260.7 as he went 17 for 22 for 284 yards.


Downfield passing. You’d have won some money if you had Tommy Rees playing the “big play passing threat” this year. His improvement throwing the ball downfield was significant.


Accuracy. Completing just 54.1 percent of throws was a bit disappointing, especially considering that Rees went into the season as the school’s most accurate passer.


Golson. Lots of Golson.

Hendrix takes aim at starting QB job at Miami (OH)

USC Notre Dame Football

It appears that Chuck Martin has found his starting quarterback. And it’s a quarterback that he knows quite well.

The Cincinnati Enquirer has confirmed the already expected news that senior quarterback Andrew Hendrix will transfer to Miami (Ohio), to play out his eligibility for Martin, his former offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach. That news was confirmed by John Rodenberg, Hendrix’s high school coach at Moeller.

“Andrew is going in to Miami as the projected starter. It’s a good deal for him,” Rodenberg told the Enquirer.

Hendrix has played sparingly the past three seasons in South Bend after redshirting his freshman year. After briefly pulling even with Tommy Rees in 2011, he’s served as a back-up the past two seasons, a third-stringer in 2012 and as the No. 2 quarterback this year.

Projecting how Hendrix will play next season is difficult. He’s had an up and down career in South Bend, known for his physical skills, a strong arm and powerful running style, but not necessarily looking or playing comfortably when given his opportunities.

While the comparison isn’t exactly fair, it’s hard not to think of ex-Irish quarterback Dayne Crist when projecting Hendrix’s fifth year. Crist spent his final year of eligibility with Charlie Weis at Kansas, taking over the starting job for a team coming off a two-win season, and then struggling as the Jayhawks were overwhelmed throughout a 1-11 season that opened with a win over South Dakota State. Crist completed 47 percent of his throws, with four touchdowns and nine interceptions, before sharing snaps with backup Michael Cummings.

Hendrix will be walking onto a team that was winless last season, with the Redhawks losing on average by an astounding 26 points. While he’ll be competing in the MAC not the Big 12, this is an even tougher assignment than the one given to Crist.

Hendrix will be competing with returning contributors Austin Gearing and Drew Kummer, who combined to complete 41 percent of their passes for one touchdown and three interceptions. Fellow Moeller quarterback Gus Ragland is Martin’s first quarterback commitment, though you’ve got to wonder if a redshirt is in store for him. With Martin bringing in a new offense, Hendrix will have a leg up from the start.

In all likelihood, we’ll get our first chance at seeing what Hendrix can do being the unquestioned starting quarterback. With his Notre Dame degree in hand, you’ve got to credit him for taking his shot. While it’s hardly an ideal situation, it’s a good opportunity for a recruit that many saw having elite potential to get his shot at showing what he can do.

Irish offense catches USC with an up-tempo attack

Rees USC

In the afterglow (or more appropriately, aftermath) of Notre Dame’s 14-10 victory over USC, most of the talk on the offensive side of the ball has been about Andrew Hendrix‘s struggles and the hit that knocked Tommy Rees out of the game.

But before either of those things occurred, the Irish offense had a breakthrough. They actually took a team to task with an up-tempo attack, moving the ball well with a check-free, call-it-and-haul-it approach that Irish fans have been waiting four seasons to see.

After the game, Kelly talked a little bit about the up-tempo offense, and how the Irish spent some of bye week finding a set of plays that would work.

“I thought we got some really good things out of it,” Kelly said, when asked to evaluate Rees in the hurry-up offense. “We had been trying to settle on a few plays that we really felt like Tommy could handle well without putting us in a position where we had to check anything.

“I didn’t want to check anything with him, and I didn’t want to be in a position where he had to pull it. And that’s not easy. So we settled on some plays, a cluster of plays that we felt were going to be good for us. I thought the tempo worked well, and I thought he played well.”

For those trying to parse some of that, one of the keys to Kelly’s comments were the, “I didn’t want to be in a position where he had to pull it.” That may be because Rees isn’t the fastest guy in the league, but it now seems more likely that the staff didn’t want to put Rees in a place where he could get hurt. As we saw, Rees is clearly the best option at QB1, which we found out just a few minutes later.

Heading into spring ball, it would have been impossible to see the current situation coming. Rees was the No. 2 quarterback and a great safety net. Gunner Kiel was a five-star, blue-chip No. 3, pushing for snaps. Even if Kiel wasn’t happy and looking to find a way out, Hendrix was a fourth-year player that had a ton of time in the program. For going on three seasons, many believed Hendrix could serve as a situational change-of-pace guy at the very least, and most likely could challenge Rees as the every-down quarterback as well. Add in an early-enrollee in Malik Zaire, and the Irish quarterback depth chart was the envy of college football.

Not anymore.

In many ways, this feels like starting over for Kelly. Four seasons ago, the Irish had a quarterback that they desperately needed to keep healthy, limiting the offense from using Dayne Crist as a runner because they couldn’t risk the injury. The gamble didn’t work, and Crist’s injuries — first “blurred vision” against Michigan and then another knee injury against Tulsa — gave rise to the Tommy Rees era.

For those clamoring for Zaire, the staff’s reluctance to play him is likely as much because he’s not ready as them wanting to save a year of eligibility. Here’s a young quarterback that came from a run-first high school program (just like Hendrix), was buried as the No. 4 quarterback during spring drills and then battled mono for much of the early season. To think the Irish will burn a redshirt if they don’t need to, and to think Zaire will be the guy that keeps the Irish BCS hopes alive, is pretty dicey. When the Irish went to Rees back in 2010, it was because they didn’t have another scholarship quarterback on the roster and Nate Montana had shown he wasn’t capable.

For now, the plan is to get Hendrix playing better and to get Rees healthy. If the Irish can do that, they’ll have a chance to use the up-tempo wrinkle some more, giving defenses one more thing to think about.