Tag: Andrew Hendrix

Andrew Hendrix Stanford

Given the chance, Hendrix finally ready for opportunity


For Notre Dame fans, Andrew Hendrix has felt like an enigma. With the tangible skill-set of a star quarterback, Irish fans have watched and waited patiently for the Cincinnati native to work his way into the starting lineup, where he’d surely be able to utilize his strong throwing arm, powerful running style, and intellect that’ll one day make him a successful M.D. Yet even with a blueprint that looked destined for success, Hendrix only seemed to move farther and farther away from the playing field as his tenure in South Bend continued.

If it weren’t for the spring’s quarterback exodus, Hendrix would likely only be remembered for a two game stretch where he was given a shot to win the quarterbacking job late in 2011. Against Stanford and Florida State, Hendrix completed just 14 of 32 passes for 216 yards, throwing two really bad interceptions in back-to-back losses to close out a disappointing season. Heading into fall camp, Hendrix looked like a fourth string quarterback, another blue-chip quarterback recruit that struggled to pan out.

But all that changed when Gunner Kiel and Everett Golson left school. And to Hendrix’s credit, he was ready to take advantage of the opportunities that finally presented themselves. Now just one play away from running the Irish offense, Brian Kelly talked about the difference between the quarterback who played against Stanford and the one that now sits at No. 2 on the depth chart.

“The difference is, as it related to Hendrix, is that he was a niche quarterback for us,” Kelly explained. “He’s no longer a niche quarterback. I mean, he can run our offense. Last year, the year before, we had to run special packages for him.”

Playing quarterback is one of the most difficult jobs in sports. It isn’t just Notre Dame (Zach Frazer, Demetrius Jones, Dayne Crist, Hendrix) that have struggled with high profile recruits. Just take a look at the entire 2010 QB class. And while Hendrix committed to studying his playbook along with his chemistry and biology workloads, he acknowledged that it was a difficult slog for him, especially not growing up surrounded by football.

“There were a lot of intricacies of the game that I didn’t know,” Hendrix said last week. “And I didn’t know that I didn’t know them.”

But Hendrix’s love of Notre Dame was a big reason why he didn’t fret when things didn’t look to be going his way on the field. And while he seemed like more of a candidate to transfer than anybody else on the depth chart, Hendrix was incredibly candid for his reasons to stick it out in South Bend.

“You would probably have to be out of your mind to leave here, in all honesty,” Hendrix said. “At all times, you’re a number of plays away from being the guy on the field. And if you have confidence in yourself, then it’s not hard to stay here. Plus, the school is unbelievable, the people are unbelievable, this organization’s great. It really was never an option in my mind.”

That loyalty is paying off. What looked in all likelihood to be Hendrix’s last season in South Bend could turn into a return in ’14, where he’ll add veteran depth to support Everett Golson. And while Tommy Rees enters the season as the clear-cut number one quarterback, Kelly seemed to fulfill one of football’s funny paradoxes. Now that Hendrix isn’t a niche quarterback, the team will try to make sure he has one on the playing field.

“We’re going to take advantage of some of the things he can do,” Kelly said. “He can run. He’s a physical runner. So we may have some more quarterback runs, but it’s not going to turn into an option game with him in there. He can run our offense. So we don’t have to turn the playbook inside out to put Andrew Hendrix into the game.

“He can do much, much more, and we’re very confident, if he has to go in the game, that he can run our offense.”

Offseason cheat sheet: Quarterbacks

Rees Kelly

From the looks of it, more than a few Notre Dame fans have come out of hibernation. After last year’s dream season came to a crashing halt, it’s more than understandable that some Irish fans decided to take a few months off before returning to the fray.

But that hasn’t stopped us. So with just over two weeks to go before the Irish kick things off against Temple, we present you a Du Lac approved crib sheet that should get you up to speed for the upcoming season.

(We’ll even spare you the Everett Golson jokes.)


Heading into spring practice, the quarterback depth chart hadn’t looked better in at least a decade. With Everett Golson, the Irish had a returning starter that looked like he had star qualities. In Tommy Rees, Notre Dame had one of the most experienced back-ups in the country. Gunner Kiel was a five-star prospect who had just taken the redshirt off and Andrew Hendrix was a guy that could help the Irish in some situational packages. Add in a promising true freshman in Malik Zaire, and trying to find reps to keep everybody happy seemed like the biggest challenge for Brian Kelly.

That certainly isn’t the case entering the season. Gone is Kiel, transferred to Cincinnati where he’ll sit out the season but have the inside track for a starting job that may have never come in South Bend. But the biggest surprise was the loss of Golson, who is not enrolled for the fall semester after some academic improprieties, costing him the ’13 season.

What looked like a five man scholarship depth chart is now down to three, forcing Tommy Rees back into the starting lineup. It’s a familiar spot for Rees, though he’s never had the comfort of knowing the job was his heading into a season.

Let’s take a look at the depth chart and do some projecting.


1. Tommy Rees, Sr. #11
2. Andrew Hendrix, Sr. #12
3. Malik Zaire, Fr. #8
4. Charlie Fiessinger, Jr. #17


It’s scary to think it, but Rees might be the most irreplaceable skill player on the Irish roster right now. There’s a major drop in offensive acumen from Rees to Hendrix, and any injury to Rees would necessitate taking off Zaire’s redshirt, something this coaching staff doesn’t want to do unless necessary.

Rees is far from a perfect player, as evidenced by his first two years playing. While accurate, he’s short an arm that can make all the throws and was loose with the football, a major reason the ’11 team didn’t reach their potential. All that being said, there’s a belief inside the program that the Irish offense won’t miss a step with Rees back behind center. While he’s got to clean up some of the mistakes that plagued him as a sophomore, he’s four years into Kelly’s system and is comfortable with what he can and can’t do. While it’s easy to think about what could have been with Golson behind center, it’s downright scary to think about what life would be like without Rees.

Looking even farther into the crystal ball, it’ll be interesting to see what happens this spring. While the intention is to have Golson back, counting on him before seeing him in South Bend isn’t a certainty. But with only DeShone Kizer in the recruiting class at quarterback, what happens with Hendrix seems to be the big question. With a degree in hand, Hendrix will have multiple opportunities both on and off the field. Will he stick around to play a final season and compete for time? Will he go to another college where a job is there for the taking? Or will he hang it up and go to med school?

Those questions can be answered later. But after starting with a meeting room short on chairs, the Irish offense needs to have a bit of good luck to reach its potential this year.

Spring Solutions: Quarterback

Rees Golson Kiel

It’s been a long time since Notre Dame’s quarterback position has had the type of stability that it now enjoys. So while Brian Kelly likely touted the idea that every quarterback would be competing for the starting job, you can’t blame redshirt freshman Gunner Kiel for reading the writing on the wall.

With Everett Golson returning after an impressive freshman campaign, and back-up seniors Tommy Rees and Andrew Hendrix still viable options in case the case of an injury, Kiel’s path to the starting lineup didn’t look any closer, with a source telling me that Kelly told Kiel he’d open at No. 3 heading into spring drills.

With Kiel’s high-profile departure, a few new scenarios open up. For early enrollee Malik Zaire, the starting lineup just got a whole lost closer, especially with Rees and Hendrix not long for the Irish roster after this season. And as the Irish coaching staff canvas the country for elite prep arms, a spot on the roster for a 2014 quarterback just got a whole lot more attractive.

Let’s take a look at the projected positional depth chart, and set some spring goals for the Irish quarterbacks.


1. Everett Golson, Jr.
2. Tommy Rees, Sr.
3. Andrew Hendrix, Sr.
4. Malik Zaire, Fr.


Everett Golson: There’s plenty of good to take away from Golson’s debut season. Namely, Golson’s impressive work leading the Irish to a 12-1 record, and throwing twice as many touchdowns as interceptions, no easy task for a freshman learning on the job.

Still, there were some very visible growing pains this season for the rising junior quarterback, and this spring should be the time where Kelly and offensive coordinator Chuck Martin ride Golson hard, challenging the quarterback to match his football acumen with his athleticism.

We’ve learned a few things about Golson after his first season at the helm of the Irish offense. We knew he had the arm strength needed to make every throw on the field. We also knew he had the ability to evade the pass rush, extending plays with his legs by keeping his eyes down field. And while we thought Golson would anchor a zone-read heavy running game, there’s not the top end, break-away speed at quarterback that many expected, though that hardly prohibits the Irish from utilizing Golson on the ground.

Matching up Golson’s debut season with Irish quarterbacks of the past isn’t a safe exercise. If it were the point would quickly be rendered moot. It blew the doors off of just about every first-year starter in modern history with hardly a comparable — unless you consider the unlikely debut of Matt LoVecchio.

There’s no question Golson is the quarterback of the future. But for the Irish to have another great season, they’ll need the offense not limited by its quarterback, but thriving because of him.

Tommy Rees: After a season spent vindicating himself after Irish fans put 2011’s underwhelming performance on his shoulders, Rees reframed his legacy with an incredible season in relief. Called upon in multiple high leverage situations, Rees answered the bell in each case, helping the Irish seal victories against Purdue, Michigan, Stanford, BYU, Oklahoma, and Pitt.

While his stats actually took a step backwards from his sophomore season numbers, Rees embodied the personality of the offense — a resilient player that might not have been impressively efficient, but gutted the job out and got it done.

In his final season of eligibility, expect Rees to once again be a fireman. And with Golson more at ease in the starting job, if Rees does see the field it’ll be for a very specific reason. Still, at every program, veteran leadership at the quarterback position is a valuable commodity. For Rees, that could be cashed in helping Golson in the film room, helping Zaire learn the ropes, and the offense in the clutch.

Andrew Hendrix: After losing the training camp battle for the starting job, Hendrix became the odd man out in the offense. He saw action in only a handful of games, putting together a stat line in only three games, Navy, BYU, and Wake Forest.

At this point, it’s clear what Hendrix is and what he isn’t. And while he possesses a skillset unique to the quarterback depth chart, it’s pretty clear that the offensive plans don’t include the once highly touted recruit from Cincinnati.

While Hendrix’s career might continue somewhere else in 2014, he’s not likely to go anywhere until after he receives his degree from Notre Dame. And in the meantime, with the depth chart established ahead of him, maybe there’s finally a package that can utilize the battering ram of a quarterback. Sure, the window closed on Hendrix being the next rifle armed passer at Notre Dame. But that doesn’t mean the offense can’t carve out a role for him.

Malik Zaire: This season just got a whole lot more interesting for Zaire, who no longer sees a logjam in front of him. That said, his job will likely be the same as it would’ve been with Kiel still on campus. Zaire will take part in spring drills, likely drinking from the same fire hydrant that overwhelmed Rees, Hendrix and Golson.

But that hasn’t stopped Zaire from preparing like he’s fighting for a job. The freshman is down in Arizona training with veteran teammates over spring break, forgoing time at home with his family for a few extra minutes of conditioning and drill work in the desert. It may not pay off in the short term, but it gives you a very good idea of what kind of player the Irish have waiting in the wings.

And so it begins: BK talks 2012 season

Brian Kelly podium

Brian Kelly doesn’t officially kick off the 2012 football season until tomorrow, when his opening press conference takes place before the start of training camp. But that didn’t stop talk of the quarterbacking race from starting early.

Joining WSBT’s Sportsbeat with Darin Pritchett and Eric Hansen, Kelly answered questions from fans all across the country for 45 minutes, giving the first look at what’s to come in the upcoming season. Talking about everything from his successful recovery from back surgery to changes to the natural grass surface in Notre Dame Stadium, Kelly was in midseason form on the talk circuit, with the quarterbacking race taking center stage.

“We all know that we’re going to be starting a young man that hasn’t started a game at that position,” Kelly said about heading to Ireland without suspended quarterback Tommy Rees. “We won’t be lacking plays. We just need to execute them well.”

Another major offseason storyline was officially put to rest when Hansen asked Kelly about Tee Shepard. The one-time early enrollee cornerback, who was likely going to play a huge part in the Irish secondary this fall, left Notre Dame before he ever had a chance to practice with the Irish, doing so beneath the fog of rumors concerning a heart problem, suspicions of academic inadequacies, and a lot of Notre Dame fans scratching their head after two of Fresno’s most talented players in years, both long committed to Notre Dame, will apparently never play football for the Fighting Irish.

While answers are still hard to come by, Kelly was overly complimentary about Shepard, but also closed the door on any return to the Irish, a rumor that was largely fueled by Shepard himself via Twitter this summer.

“That door has now closed and we have invested those assets in other positions,” Kelly said. “That ship has sailed.”

One ship that hasn’t sailed is the playing surface inside Notre Dame Stadium. When asked about the future of natural grass, Kelly was cut and dry not only about his preference for field turf, but also spoke pointedly that the artificial surface was making its way inside the house that Rockne built.

“Field turf is coming,” Kelly said.

Kelly also spoke highly of the offseason work done by veterans like TJ Jones, Theo Riddick and Zeke Motta, and a freshman class that came into camp in better shape than anyone expected. He talked up local talent Daniel Smith, who had another summer surgery to get him healthy, a never-ending theme for the physically gifted wideout.

The battle along the offensive line seems to be focused on right guard. With Christian Lombard seemingly owning the right tackle slot, it’ll be fifth-year grad Mike Golic battling Nick Martin for a starting role and Tate Nichols likely relegated to backing up Lombard. The unit will look to get more consistency and better with its technique under new offensive line coach Harry Hiestand.

“We wanted somebody who could get to the point where technique was number one,” Kelly said of Hiestand. “Ed Warinner did a very good job for us, but I was look for something a little bit different this time around. We wanted to focus on the fundamentals.”

Speaking of the fundamentals, nowhere will that come into play more than at quarterback. After spending the spring focusing on taking control of the offense and holding onto the football.

“Take great care of the football,” Kelly said, pointing to the key criteria in the quarterbacking battle. “The quarterback that’s going to play against Navy is the one we trust most to take care of the football.”

Kelly perhaps revealed his hand a bit when asked the million dollar question that’ll likely shape preseason camp. When asked if he had an idea of who that quarterback would be, Kelly didn’t hesitate.

“I do. I’ve got an idea in my mind,” Kelly said. “But we now have to take that from  meeting room talk and go apply that. One’s not good enough. We’ve got to get a couple guys ready for Navy and for the season. We’ve got a couple ideas, but it’ll take some time.”


Counting down the Irish: 25-21– RECOUNT UPDATE!

Robby Toma

RECOUNT UPDATE: If there was any question whether I’ve been out of the finance game too long, your fearless leader messed up his Excel spreadsheet and jacked up the rankings. This changes a few of the players we’ve tallied and puts Zeke Motta in at No. 25. My sincere apologies.


It’s time to unveil the beginning of our annual Top 25 list, counting down the best players on the Irish roster. It’s an especially interesting list, and the group polled had some outstanding, yet very different, takes on who makes up the upper echelon of the Irish roster.

Last year, the top 15 players on our countdown were upperclassmen. This year, underclassmen make up almost one-third of the countdown, with one slotting into the top five. The biggest variance in voting was at the quarterback position. All four quarterbacks received votes, with last year’s depth chart hardly representative in this evaluation.

Here’s our voting panel:

Eric Hansen, South Bend Tribune @HansenSouthBend
John Walters, The Daily @jdubs88
John Vannie, NDNation.com
Eric Murtaugh, representing OneFootDown.com  @OneFootDown
Ryan Ritter, representing HerLoyalSons.com @HLS_NDtex
Keith Arnold, NBCSports.com’s Inside the Irish @KeithArnoldNBC


25. Zeke Motta (S, Sr.) Quietly, Motta has put together a fairly solid career in South Bend, all while flying through the program much too quickly. Playing as a true freshman, Motta used a year of eligibility on special teams, and then had no choice but to play as a raw sophomore when safeties Jamoris Slaughter and Danny McCarthy went down with injuries. He’s had some bad swings and misses tackling in the open field, but Motta certainly looks the part of a big-time safety, and now we’ll find out if he’s the type of player that can anchor a unit. He was left off only one ballot (mine), and was the 26th man I had listed.

(Highest ranking: 21st. Lowest ranking: Unranked)

24. Tommy Rees (QB, Jr.) To call Rees the most polarizing player on the roster is probably understating it. The junior quarterback is Notre Dame’s all-time leader in completion percentage, but is probably the fourth most popular quarterback on the Irish roster after 14 interceptions and five fumbles lost crippled the Irish offense. Rees’ lack of mobility limit the Irish offense’s ability to utilize the quarterback in the running game, but he’s got the best grasp of the system, after playing in 20 games over the last two seasons. Rees’ erratic play helps explain the difficulty in ranking him. Two voters left him off their ballots completely, while one placed him on the number.

(Highest ranking: 17th. Lowest Ranking: Unranked x 2)

23. Andrew Hendrix (QB, Jr.) That Hendrix slots in front of the quarterback he backed up all season is telling. Also telling is the diversity in opinions on the junior quarterback from Ohio, who was left off three ballots entirely, but was the top quarterback on two others. Hendrix has all the physical tools necessary to win the starting quarterback job, but his feel for the game still lacks after two seasons in Kelly’s spread system. After completing all four of his throws against Air Force, Hendrix completed just 14 of his next 33 throws, with bad interceptions against Stanford and Florida State. On the ground, Hendrix presents an intriguing option, with the 220-pound bruiser a powerful option.

(Highest ranking: 14th. Lowest ranking: Unranked x 3)

22. Davonte Neal (WR, Fr.) Neal was one of the top ranked athletes in the country as a high school senior. And while wide receiver is an educated guess on where he’ll end up playing, Neal could easily contribute at cornerback and certainly should get a look in the return game. Neal’s speed is his best attribute, and getting the 5-foot-10, 175-pound dynamo in space with the football should give the Irish a much needed game breaker on the edges of the offense.  Neal is the highest rated freshman on this list, and slots in one spot beneath where Aaron Lynch ranked last year.

(Highest ranking: 16th. Lowest ranking: Unranked x 2)

21. TJ Jones (WR, Jr.) It shouldn’t be surprising that a two-year starter at wide receiver is ranked this high, yet Jones’ production leveled off after a promising freshman season. At 5-foot-11, 187-pounds, Jones lacks the size needed for an elite outside receiver, and a career average of 11 yards a catch doesn’t point to top end speed. But Jones carried a heavy burden last season with the sudden death of his father, and his inclusion on the Biletnikoff watch list shows he hasn’t been forgotten. Three voters left Jones off their lists completely, but his rating was buoyed by three votes that had him in the top twenty.

(Highest ranking: 13th. Lowest ranking: Unranked x 3)