Tag: Andrew Hendrix

USC Notre Dame Football

Hendrix takes aim at starting QB job at Miami (OH)


It appears that Chuck Martin has found his starting quarterback. And it’s a quarterback that he knows quite well.

The Cincinnati Enquirer has confirmed the already expected news that senior quarterback Andrew Hendrix will transfer to Miami (Ohio), to play out his eligibility for Martin, his former offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach. That news was confirmed by John Rodenberg, Hendrix’s high school coach at Moeller.

“Andrew is going in to Miami as the projected starter. It’s a good deal for him,” Rodenberg told the Enquirer.

Hendrix has played sparingly the past three seasons in South Bend after redshirting his freshman year. After briefly pulling even with Tommy Rees in 2011, he’s served as a back-up the past two seasons, a third-stringer in 2012 and as the No. 2 quarterback this year.

Projecting how Hendrix will play next season is difficult. He’s had an up and down career in South Bend, known for his physical skills, a strong arm and powerful running style, but not necessarily looking or playing comfortably when given his opportunities.

While the comparison isn’t exactly fair, it’s hard not to think of ex-Irish quarterback Dayne Crist when projecting Hendrix’s fifth year. Crist spent his final year of eligibility with Charlie Weis at Kansas, taking over the starting job for a team coming off a two-win season, and then struggling as the Jayhawks were overwhelmed throughout a 1-11 season that opened with a win over South Dakota State. Crist completed 47 percent of his throws, with four touchdowns and nine interceptions, before sharing snaps with backup Michael Cummings.

Hendrix will be walking onto a team that was winless last season, with the Redhawks losing on average by an astounding 26 points. While he’ll be competing in the MAC not the Big 12, this is an even tougher assignment than the one given to Crist.

Hendrix will be competing with returning contributors Austin Gearing and Drew Kummer, who combined to complete 41 percent of their passes for one touchdown and three interceptions. Fellow Moeller quarterback Gus Ragland is Martin’s first quarterback commitment, though you’ve got to wonder if a redshirt is in store for him. With Martin bringing in a new offense, Hendrix will have a leg up from the start.

In all likelihood, we’ll get our first chance at seeing what Hendrix can do being the unquestioned starting quarterback. With his Notre Dame degree in hand, you’ve got to credit him for taking his shot. While it’s hardly an ideal situation, it’s a good opportunity for a recruit that many saw having elite potential to get his shot at showing what he can do.

Irish offense catches USC with an up-tempo attack

Rees USC

In the afterglow (or more appropriately, aftermath) of Notre Dame’s 14-10 victory over USC, most of the talk on the offensive side of the ball has been about Andrew Hendrix‘s struggles and the hit that knocked Tommy Rees out of the game.

But before either of those things occurred, the Irish offense had a breakthrough. They actually took a team to task with an up-tempo attack, moving the ball well with a check-free, call-it-and-haul-it approach that Irish fans have been waiting four seasons to see.

After the game, Kelly talked a little bit about the up-tempo offense, and how the Irish spent some of bye week finding a set of plays that would work.

“I thought we got some really good things out of it,” Kelly said, when asked to evaluate Rees in the hurry-up offense. “We had been trying to settle on a few plays that we really felt like Tommy could handle well without putting us in a position where we had to check anything.

“I didn’t want to check anything with him, and I didn’t want to be in a position where he had to pull it. And that’s not easy. So we settled on some plays, a cluster of plays that we felt were going to be good for us. I thought the tempo worked well, and I thought he played well.”

For those trying to parse some of that, one of the keys to Kelly’s comments were the, “I didn’t want to be in a position where he had to pull it.” That may be because Rees isn’t the fastest guy in the league, but it now seems more likely that the staff didn’t want to put Rees in a place where he could get hurt. As we saw, Rees is clearly the best option at QB1, which we found out just a few minutes later.

Heading into spring ball, it would have been impossible to see the current situation coming. Rees was the No. 2 quarterback and a great safety net. Gunner Kiel was a five-star, blue-chip No. 3, pushing for snaps. Even if Kiel wasn’t happy and looking to find a way out, Hendrix was a fourth-year player that had a ton of time in the program. For going on three seasons, many believed Hendrix could serve as a situational change-of-pace guy at the very least, and most likely could challenge Rees as the every-down quarterback as well. Add in an early-enrollee in Malik Zaire, and the Irish quarterback depth chart was the envy of college football.

Not anymore.

In many ways, this feels like starting over for Kelly. Four seasons ago, the Irish had a quarterback that they desperately needed to keep healthy, limiting the offense from using Dayne Crist as a runner because they couldn’t risk the injury. The gamble didn’t work, and Crist’s injuries — first “blurred vision” against Michigan and then another knee injury against Tulsa — gave rise to the Tommy Rees era.

For those clamoring for Zaire, the staff’s reluctance to play him is likely as much because he’s not ready as them wanting to save a year of eligibility. Here’s a young quarterback that came from a run-first high school program (just like Hendrix), was buried as the No. 4 quarterback during spring drills and then battled mono for much of the early season. To think the Irish will burn a redshirt if they don’t need to, and to think Zaire will be the guy that keeps the Irish BCS hopes alive, is pretty dicey. When the Irish went to Rees back in 2010, it was because they didn’t have another scholarship quarterback on the roster and Nate Montana had shown he wasn’t capable.

For now, the plan is to get Hendrix playing better and to get Rees healthy. If the Irish can do that, they’ll have a chance to use the up-tempo wrinkle some more, giving defenses one more thing to think about.

Given the chance, Hendrix finally ready for opportunity

Andrew Hendrix Stanford

For Notre Dame fans, Andrew Hendrix has felt like an enigma. With the tangible skill-set of a star quarterback, Irish fans have watched and waited patiently for the Cincinnati native to work his way into the starting lineup, where he’d surely be able to utilize his strong throwing arm, powerful running style, and intellect that’ll one day make him a successful M.D. Yet even with a blueprint that looked destined for success, Hendrix only seemed to move farther and farther away from the playing field as his tenure in South Bend continued.

If it weren’t for the spring’s quarterback exodus, Hendrix would likely only be remembered for a two game stretch where he was given a shot to win the quarterbacking job late in 2011. Against Stanford and Florida State, Hendrix completed just 14 of 32 passes for 216 yards, throwing two really bad interceptions in back-to-back losses to close out a disappointing season. Heading into fall camp, Hendrix looked like a fourth string quarterback, another blue-chip quarterback recruit that struggled to pan out.

But all that changed when Gunner Kiel and Everett Golson left school. And to Hendrix’s credit, he was ready to take advantage of the opportunities that finally presented themselves. Now just one play away from running the Irish offense, Brian Kelly talked about the difference between the quarterback who played against Stanford and the one that now sits at No. 2 on the depth chart.

“The difference is, as it related to Hendrix, is that he was a niche quarterback for us,” Kelly explained. “He’s no longer a niche quarterback. I mean, he can run our offense. Last year, the year before, we had to run special packages for him.”

Playing quarterback is one of the most difficult jobs in sports. It isn’t just Notre Dame (Zach Frazer, Demetrius Jones, Dayne Crist, Hendrix) that have struggled with high profile recruits. Just take a look at the entire 2010 QB class. And while Hendrix committed to studying his playbook along with his chemistry and biology workloads, he acknowledged that it was a difficult slog for him, especially not growing up surrounded by football.

“There were a lot of intricacies of the game that I didn’t know,” Hendrix said last week. “And I didn’t know that I didn’t know them.”

But Hendrix’s love of Notre Dame was a big reason why he didn’t fret when things didn’t look to be going his way on the field. And while he seemed like more of a candidate to transfer than anybody else on the depth chart, Hendrix was incredibly candid for his reasons to stick it out in South Bend.

“You would probably have to be out of your mind to leave here, in all honesty,” Hendrix said. “At all times, you’re a number of plays away from being the guy on the field. And if you have confidence in yourself, then it’s not hard to stay here. Plus, the school is unbelievable, the people are unbelievable, this organization’s great. It really was never an option in my mind.”

That loyalty is paying off. What looked in all likelihood to be Hendrix’s last season in South Bend could turn into a return in ’14, where he’ll add veteran depth to support Everett Golson. And while Tommy Rees enters the season as the clear-cut number one quarterback, Kelly seemed to fulfill one of football’s funny paradoxes. Now that Hendrix isn’t a niche quarterback, the team will try to make sure he has one on the playing field.

“We’re going to take advantage of some of the things he can do,” Kelly said. “He can run. He’s a physical runner. So we may have some more quarterback runs, but it’s not going to turn into an option game with him in there. He can run our offense. So we don’t have to turn the playbook inside out to put Andrew Hendrix into the game.

“He can do much, much more, and we’re very confident, if he has to go in the game, that he can run our offense.”