Tag: Bob Diaco

Bob Diaco hat

Bob Diaco accepts the UConn head coaching job


Notre Dame defensive coordinator Bob Diaco has accepted the head coaching position at UConn. NBC Sports has confirmed the news that was first reported by CBS Sports’ Bruce Feldman. The 2012 Broyles Award winner leaves another huge hole in Brian Kelly’s staff, with both Diaco and offensive coordinator Chuck Martin taking head coaching jobs in the past week.

The 40-year-old New Jersey native joined Brian Kelly at Central Michigan, before leaving to coach under Al Groh at Virginia. Diaco rejoined Kelly at Cincinnati where he coordinated the defense in 2009, before joining the Notre Dame staff in the same position. Diaco was promoted to assistant head coach before the 2012 season.

Under Diaco, the Irish defense has improved dramatically. In 2009, Notre Dame was rated 63rd in scoring defense. They improved to 23rd in the country his first season, improving by nearly a touchdown. The Irish stayed a Top 25 defense in 2011 before the 2012 team became one of the best defenses in school history, giving up just 12.8 points a game.

Even with injuries, the Irish defense finished the regular season ranked 32nd in scoring average, giving up 22.9 points a game. While some detractors tired off Diaco’s bend-but-don’t-break coverage schemes and the struggles to create turnovers, Diaco was a key part of transforming an Irish defense that was soft for the better part of a decade before becoming the equivalent of a heavyweight bruiser.

While Diaco’s reputation as a strategist is impressive, where he truly shines is in the locker room. A quick search on Twitter for Irish player reactions lets you know how deeply loved he was by his team. A fiercely intense leader who led with a passion that he demanded from his players, Diaco quickly got buy-in from a team by committing to positive coaching and rebuilding a group with a heavily damaged psyche.

Diaco very nearly left the program after last year’s undefeated regular season. But the timing of leaving his team before they played for the BCS Championship just didn’t sit well with an assistant who preached loyalty above all else.

Diaco takes the reins of a UConn program after Michigan State defensive coordinator Pat Narduzzi turned the job down. CBS Sports’ Bruce Feldman reports that Diaco will make $1.5 million a season on a five-year deal.

Brian Kelly will now need to fill two key positions on his staff. Kerry Cooks was promoted to co-defensive coordinator before the 2012 season. Defensive line coach Mike Elston looks to have coordinator chops as well. Even safeties coach Bobby Elliot has a strong reputation and coordinated some elite defenses.

After miraculously keeping the Irish coaching staff together after the 2012 season, Diaco’s departure marks the end of an era. That’s three coordinators under Brian Kelly that have accepted head coaching positions. We’ll find out soon if the Irish head coach can reload as the elite coaches in college football do.

Objectives cut and dry for both teams

Central Michigan v Michigan

Football is a game of numbers. And it’s not hard to look at a few of them and understand the difference between winning and losing.

When you check the stat sheet from last year’s 13-6 game, the Irish held Michigan’s offense to just 299 yards while forcing a whopping six turnovers in a hard-earned victory. Compare that to the game in ’11, when Michigan racked up 452 yards, while going +2 in the turnover differential in their furious comeback win. Turnovers and defense. Hold onto the football and limit yards. Just about any guy with a gas grill and a cable TV package can figure that one out.

That said, the key to the Irish’s defensive plan makes simple math look mighty complicated. Especially when facing a quarterback like the ones Michigan has had behind center the past few years. Gone is Denard Robinson, a quarterback Brian Kelly called the most dynamic and electric playmaker he’s ever seen at the position. But in his place is Devin Gardner, another dual threat player that also happens to throw the football with grace and accuracy.

Kelly talked about defending a guy like Gardner, who he compared to Randall Cunningham, and how it’ll be different than facing someone like Robinson.

“Gardner throws the ball with much more accuracy,” Kelly said. “He pushes the ball down the field very easily.  And he certainly scrambles very well, keeps his eyes downfield and is not afraid to run. Another dual‑threat quarterback that is going to be very, very difficult to defend.”

As the Irish prepare to face yet another Wolverine quarterback that keeps defensive coordinators up at night, Michigan offensive coordinator Al Borges talked about the challenges that he faces in the Irish defense, a group that shut down his offense last season.

“They’re as good as anybody we’ll play I think, across the board,” Borges said. “A stout nose guard, two athletic defensive ends. They don’t have Te’o any more at linebacker, but they’re still pretty active kids. Solid cover guys on the back end.

“They know their system pretty well because they’ve been playing it for a while. They’ll be formidable. That’s a good defensive football team.”

Borges brings up what life is like for Notre Dame after Te’o. Kelly also talked about Michigan’s offense post-Robinson. That leaves a little bit of guessing for both teams, as tendencies and structure tends to change.

“We’ll have a little bit of a different plan,” Kelly said. “There’ll obviously be some similarities, but they’re different players.”

Borges conceded the same, though reserved the right to go back and use some things that have been successful.

“We’re different, but there’s still a little carry over here and there that you can steal from a year ago,” Borges said.

That carryover exists in the ability to scramble. Michigan coaches likely watched Temple quarterback Connor Reilly scrambling last Saturday and began licking their chops. That’s where Gardner is at his best — dangerous with his legs but deadly with his arm — and put together a few highlight reel plays against Central Michigan, extending plays until a receiver broke open. It’s something Borges and the Wolverines offense has worked hard at perfecting.

“You have to have some structure within your improv. What we practice, and talk about a lot, is how we are going to adjust when the pocket is broken,” Borges said.

Last year, that rarely happened. The Irish were able to pin Robinson in the pocket, using an overpowering front seven to keep Michigan’s quarterback hemmed in and hassled, forcing bad decisions by Robinson, which turned into four interceptions.

While Gardner sparkled over the weekend, he still threw two interceptions — one a very bad decision deep in his own territory and the other when he was under duress.

“I know one thing about Devin. If he uses good judgment, he’s a problem for the defense,” Borges said. “There’s some stuff you just don’t draw up on that board to account for. You’ve got to cover him and cover the receivers. And that’s not easy to do.”

Limit yardage and force turnovers. Play mistake free and get outside the pocket. Only one of these two objectives will be reached. And that team will likely be celebrating a hard fought victory Saturday night.

Broyles Award finds perfect fit in Bob Diaco

Bob Diaco hat

When Frank Broyles and his selection committee set out to rightfully honor the very best in assistant coaches, they had probably never heard of Bob Diaco. At the time, Diaco was a young man just completing a college football career at Iowa, playing for the legendary Hayden Fry.

Yet even as a two-time All-Big Ten linebacker, a team captain, and a co-MVP, Diaco had the heart of a coach. He understood how special football was, from the on-field battles, the strategy, and the communal relationships. He showed up in a shirt and tie his first day as a Hawkeye. He battled through injuries and ups and downs at Iowa, but never lost the determination that still shows through today.

Diaco’s journey to the Broyles Award, given to college football’s best assistant coach, hasn’t been an easy one. At Notre Dame, many doubted Kelly’s choice for defensive coordinator, wondering if he was even the best choice for the job on Kelly’s own staff. Those doubts turned vocal after Diaco’s defense gave up 367 rushing yards to Navy in his first season, the low-water mark for the Irish defense in the Brian Kelly era.

Yet Diaco has stuck to his plan. Just as importantly, he’s continued to build Notre Dame’s defense. With boundless enthusiasm and energy, Diaco had set out unabashedly to build the best defense in America, a goal that seemed laughable at the time. But three seasons later, Diaco achieved his goal, with the Irish leading the nation in scoring defense, the ultimate measure of the unit.

A year after being a semifinalist for the Broyles Award, Diaco was selected its winner this year, just another one of the spoils that have come along with Notre Dame’s 12-0 season. And in earning the achievement, Diaco was awarded not just for his job well done on the sidelines, but for his near perfect fit at Notre Dame.

As Diaco’s name continues to circulate as colleges fill their head coaching vacancies, that factor isn’t lost on Diaco, nor his boss, Brian Kelly.

“It doesn’t surprise me if they wanted to talk to Bob Diaco. I think he’s the finest defensive coordinator in the country,” Kelly said last week.

Yet Kelly also understands Diaco’s role at Notre Dame, and the almost perfect marriage Diaco has with the school, his faith, and the players he continues to passionately recruit to South Bend. So much so, Notre Dame’s defensive coordinator and assistant head coach referenced the school’s mission statement during his acceptance speech.

“It’s very interesting that the final line of their mission statement at the university, ‘Notre Dame pursues its objectives through the formation of an authentic human community, graced by the spirit of Christ.’ And that’s what they get done,” Diaco said when he accepted the award.

“The players at Notre Dame chose Notre Dame because they expect excellence. They’re achievement oriented. And they go to class. So they go to four or five classes in the day. And those classes are pretty dynamic, you’ve probably got a pretty good picture of what a class at Notre Dame looks like. So then at the end of the day, he’s coming to my class. So you better have your bar set real high. Because I’ve got to put on the best class of the day. Because they’re looking at you and they’re expecting it.”

As Notre Dame fought the noble battle of doing things right in the classroom while trying to battle the best in college football, it was easy for skeptics to scoff at one of the game’s relics, fighting a seemingly unwinnable battle. But now that Notre Dame has all but done the impossible — leading the country in graduation rate, while also ranking atop the sport on the field — it’s forced other schools to take a hard look at how they go about their business.

But that’s all been part of Diaco’s mission. And he’s openly stated that there’s more to his job than just playing great defense and winning football games. And that’s what made him so grateful for Broyles Award.

“Just trying to serve,” Diaco said, telling the assembled group about one of his life tenants. “I’m just trying to be the best servant that I can possibly be. And that’s why this award is so special to me, personally. It’s acknowledging the fact of a job well done to being a servant.”



Special thanks to the Broyles Award and Jason Brown for making Diaco’s acceptance speech available.