Tag: Cameron Roberson

Matt Cashore

Holiday weekend notes: Frosh numbers, redshirts, and more


Compare today to running an offseason marathon. No doubt, we are slogging along here, but the good news is we’ve just passed the 13-mile marker. We’re more than half-way there, and while that terrible realization that you’ve still got 13 miles left to run might cross your mind, the very good news is that we’re more than half-way there.

Before we take a nice long weekend to enjoy Fourth of July fireworks and all things Americana, here are a few assorted thoughts and notes stockpiled from a pretty slow week in Irish country. Don’t worry, on the flipside of the long holiday weekend, we’ll have just a month to go until the Irish break into fall camp.


Freshman numbers were officially released and for those of you wondering who is wearing what, query no more.

1 – Ishaq Williams
4 – George Atkinson
5 – Everett Golson
7 – Stephon Tuitt
16 – Davaris Daniels
18 – Ben Koyack
19 – Aaron Lynch
21 – Jalen Brown
27 – Kyle Brindza
30 – Ben Councell
33 – Cam McDaniel
34 – Eilar Hardy
41 – Matthias Farley
43 – Josh Atkinson
50 – Chase Hounshell
56 – Brad Carrico
56 – Anthony Rabasa
58 – Troy Niklas
59 – Jarrett Grace
65 – Conor Hanratty
69 – Tony Springmann
72 – Nick Martin
77 – Matt Hegarty

A few thoughts on uniform numbers (can you tell it’s July?):

If you’re looking for some fearsome defenders wearing some low-digits, I’d argue that throwing Ishaq Williams, Stephon Tuitt, and Aaron Lynch into jerseys usually worn by quarterbacks and kickers takes the cake for roster juxtaposition.

Any question about where George Atkinson will end up is officially over for the season. Paired with Gary Gray wearing No. 4, there’s no way that Atkinson can play defense this year. (Ditto for Brad Carrico and Anthony Rabasa — both assigned No. 56, with Carrico on the offensive line and Rabasa playing defense.)

Two numbers you won’t be getting confused with: No. 7 — Stephon Tuitt, at roughly 6-foot-6, 280 and TJ Jones, generously listed at 5-foot-11 and 187. No. 5 — Everett Golson, listed at 6-foot, 180 (in heels) and Manti Te’o, listed at 6-foot-2 and 255 pounds.


While most of the focus is on the actual freshman entering Notre Dame this summer, it’s an incredibly important summer for the other freshman, those that preserved a year of eligibility and stayed off the field in 2010. Here’s a quick rundown of those second-year students that will be playing with freshman eligibility.

QB: Andrew Hendrix — Critical season for arguably the Irish’s most talented signal caller. Best case: He’s the 2012 starting QB. Worst case: He’s sitting out 2012 as a transfer at another BCS program.

RB: Cameron Roberson — Roberson’s ACL injury during spring was one of the biggest setbacks for the Irish in the offseason. The scout team player of the year was ready to step in and contribute on offense.

WR: Luke Massa — After finishing fifth-wheel in a four-man quarterback derby, Massa showed his athleticism as a quick study during spring drills at WR. He could turn himself into a Robby Parris type of player.

TE: Alex Welch — Welch was almost too good to redshirt last year in fall camp, but Kelly wisely kept him out even after Kyle Rudolph’s injury. He’s not physically ready for the trenches, but he’ll be an asset in the passing game.

OL: Christian Lombard — If there’s a candidate for a Zack Martin-type ascension it’s Lombard, who had already beaten out Matt Romine at tackle and have the coaches feeling very confident in their depth along the line.

OL: Tate Nichols — After spending a season learning how to use his massive frame, the 6-foot-8 Nichols will likely continue to develop behind right tackle Taylor Dever. Either way, he’ll look good getting off the bus.

OL/DL: Bruce Heggie — The ultimate Kelly developmental project, Heggie looks every bit the part of a guy that’ll help a football team win. Where and when is still to be determined.

NT: Louis Nix — If there’s a player that’s got a bigger reputation from spending a season on the sidelines, I can’t seem to remember one. “Irish Chocolate” should make an immediate impact in the middle of the defense.

LB: Justin Utupo — A high school defensive lineman, Utupo spent his freshman season learning the inside linebacker position. He could be the heir apparent to fellow Haka dancer Manti Te’o.

LB: Kendall Moore — A hugely athletic inside linebacker that would’ve been used on special teams by any other Irish head coach since Lou, Moore instead won scout team defensive player awards for his work during practice. He’s got a chance to start next to Te’o this season.


Changing beats, Notre Dame and the Indiana Department of Labor reached a settlement agreement stemming from the fatal accident that took student videographer Declan Sullivan’s life. Under the terms of the agreement, Notre Dame will make an unannounced contribution to the Declan Drumm Sullivan Memorial Fund and had its fine reduced from $77,500 to $42,000, which will be paid to the Indiana Department of Labor.

More importantly, Notre Dame will launch a nationwide educational program that’s directed at other universities and educational organizations about the dangers of outdoor scissor lifts. The program must be launched within 180 days.

“Notre Dame has said multiple times publicly that it wants to ensure nothing like Declan’s death occurs again on its watch, and that it wants to honor Declan’s memory,” IDOL Commissioner Lori Torres said in a written statement. “We believe this unique agreement allows Notre Dame to live up to those statements, and it allows our agency to carry out its primary mission, which is to advance the safety of employees throughout the state.”

Speaking on behalf of the Sullivan family, Mike Miley, Declan’s uncle, had this to say to the South Bend Tribune:

“The university contines to be forthright in communicating with the family,” Miley said. “Every step they are taking is in conjunction with the family needs.”


Pregame six pack: Your guide to the Blue-Gold game

Getty Images - Jonathan Daniel

As thousands of Irish fans descend on South Bend for the 82nd annual Blue-Gold game (and the first televised nationally — 2:00 p.m. ET on Versus — likely featuring yours truly), here are six tidbits, quick hits, fun facts or leftovers to get you ready for a Saturday of football.

1.Blue-Gold success isn’t necessarily an indicator of regular season performance.

If you’re looking for an idea of what to expect from the Blue-Gold game, it makes sense to look back at last year’s intrasquad game. Let’s take a look at what we learned from last year’s game and see if it translated to regular season success.

For every breakout performance like the one Cierre Wood had, there was a huge day by a guy like Nate Montana or walk-on running back Patrick Coughlin. After Montana’s 18 for 30 day, which included three touchdown passes, who’d have thought that it’d be Tommy Rees battling for the No. 1 quarterback job and Montana off in Missoula.

Steve Filer was a monster for the Gold team on defense, notching 12 tackles (2 TFL) while playing with much of the starting defense. That didn’t help Filer crack the starting rotation, relegated to another year on special teams for a third straight season. Meanwhile, starting opposite Filer, Darius Fleming didn’t register a tackle on the official score sheet.

There are going to be players that break-out during this year’s Blue-Gold game (as long as the weather lets them), but before we assume that means big production next year, let’s keep our expectations in check.

2. Let’s hope Mom and Dad brought their cameras, because some unknown running backs are going to be making some plays.

With Cameron Roberson out with a torn ACL, Jonas Gray limited and Cierre Wood already a proven commodity, get ready to see some guys totting the football that you’ve never seen. As we just mentioned, walk-on Patrick Coughlin turned some heads with some hard-running in the second half of last year’s Blue-Gold game, but if you want to win a prop-bet or two with your friends, keep your eyes on Derry Herlihy. The graduating senior from Houston, Texas came back to support the team after injuries wiped out an already thin depth chart, and he’s got all the makings of a 20 carry back as the game winds down in the second half.

Herlihy isn’t just a tackling dummy, he’s actually spent time on two Irish rosters, moonlighting on the Notre Dame club rugby team as it returned to the Division I ranks.

“Rugby’s a man’s game,” Herlihy said back in November. “It definitely toughened me up a bit. Hitting someone with pads on is a piece of cake after you do it without any pads.”

(We’ll see if he’s saying that after Saturday…)

Rounding out the walk-on depth chart will be Tyler Plantz, a sophomore from Frankfort, Illinois, who should also spent quite some time picking grass out of his helmet.

With Cam McDaniel coming back in the fall, and George Atkinson getting a look at tailback as well, this might be the last chance for a walk-on running back to make a name for himself. It may not help the Irish come the regular season, but it sure would be a great photo to show the grandkids.

3. It’s a recruiting extravaganza for the Irish coaching staff this weekend.

With the Irish stuck on two committed recruits, expect that number to climb in the coming days. Even though the weather won’t cooperate, the coaching staff will be balancing the Blue-Gold game with a slew of important recruits.

According to IrishSportsDaily.com, the Irish will be welcoming incoming freshman Jalen Brown, Davaris Daniels, Jarrett Grace, Conor Hanratty, Eilar Hardy, Chase Hounshell, Ben Koyack, Nick Martin, and Tony Springmann to campus.

As for the 2012 class, both commitments Tee Shepard and Taylor Decker plan to be on hand, as well as over a dozen more high-profile recruits, including speedster Ronald Darby, quarterback Maty Mauk, defensive tackle Tommy Schutt, and wide receiver Amara Darboh.

4. It’s the final day to end a position battle on the right foot.

Regardless of whether you’re neck and neck for a position like Danny Spond and Prince Shembo or a presumed starter like Carlo Calabrese, Saturday’s Blue-Gold game is the last chance to put a good rep on tape for the long off-season.

Calabrese spent a lot of time listening to his name being uttered by both head coach Brian Kelly and his defensive coordinator Bob Diaco, two things that never feel good. It’s clear that the coaching staff, even though they’ve called Calabrese the starter opposite Manti Te’o, think the rising junior has a ways to go before he matures into the player that they need.

Some players need to take advantage of the spring game and use it as proof that the coaching staff found what they were looking for. Last year, Steve Filer’s 12 tackles weren’t enough to hold off Kerry Neal and Brian Smith at outside linebacker. And this year, while Spond and Shembo have slid in front of the senior linebacker, head coach Brian Kelly thinks he’s found the proper way to utilize the athleticism and pass-rushing skills of the Chicago native.

“Steve Filer has had a great spring for us,” Kelly said earlier this week. “I think we found his niche.”

5. Irish fans, get ready for your first look at the Freshman Five.

It’s been so long since we’ve seen Aaron Lynch and Ishaq Williams making plays in San Antonio at the Army All-American Bowl, some Irish fans might need to pinch themselves when they finally see two of the best defensive recruits in the nation wearing the gold helmet of the Fighting Irish this Saturday.

With one offensive line sliding it’s way through the game, Lynch should have all he can handle when he’s matched up with Zack Martin or senior Taylor Dever and it’ll give the coaching staff a good idea of how ready Lynch is to compete come next fall. Even though Bob Diaco will keep things pretty vanilla on defense, expect to see Ishaq Williams engage in the pass rush as well.

One member of the green brigade is Brad Carrico, the Irish’s first commitment in the 2011 class, who has already shifted from defensive end to offensive line. Carrico’s massive frame (which is lighter after a nutrition regimen and time with strength coach Paul Longo) and quick feet make him a quick study at offensive line. Saturday we’ll see how he does with live ammo.

After hearing about Kyle Brindza’s prodigious kicking leg, Irish fans half expect him to kick the ball out of the back of the endzone on kickoffs. Brindza will likely get a few chances as well as an opportunity to battle for placekicking and punting jobs. For all the hoopla other recruits received, Brindza’s story might be the best, with the PARADE All-American enduring seven surgeries on his right foot by the age of 12 to repair a club foot that doctors thought might keep him out of sports completely.

No freshman will have a bigger spotlight on them than Everett Golson, who will likely take the lion’s share of QB reps as he squares off against Andrew Hendrix. (More on that now…)

6. Enjoy the four-headed quarterbacking monster while it lasts.

History tells us that while having four solid quarterbacks that could potentially win games is nice, it’s also incredibly fleeting. While Brian Kelly and his coaching staff might not be saying it, Saturday’s game could be incredibly important deciding the future of Notre Dame’s depth chart at the position.

Kelly has already stated that Dayne Crist and Tommy Rees aren’t likely to take many snaps, but they should spend a few series with the offense, plays that’ll be important for both Crist and Rees to show comfort and excel directing the Irish offense.

But the battle between Hendrix and Golson might be worth watching even closer, because if Golson pulls ahead of Hendrix exiting spring ball, the Irish coaching staff might be in danger of losing their No. 4 quarterback, a guy who’s probably the most talented QB on the roster.

There are plenty of ways this thing could play out, including some that see Crist taking off and playing in a system that better fits his game. Setting fictional scenarios aside, there aren’t too many examples where all four quarterbacks continue biding their time and waiting their turn, especially with the Irish courting blue-chipper Maty Mauk and top national QB Gunner Kiel, who has the Irish near the top of a very prestigious list.

Injuries end Roberson and McDonald’s spring

Cam Roberson
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Brian Kelly’s suspicions were confirmed when an MRI of freshman running back Cameron Roberson’s knee showed a partially torn ACL and a torn lateral collateral ligament. There’s no official timetable on Roberson’s return, but you’ve got to think that getting anything out of Roberson next season would be a big surprise.

Meanwhile, linebacker Anthony McDonald’s spring is over after suffering a partially torn pectoral muscle. McDonald was a front runner to play next to Manti Te’o last season but had injuries derail his progress as Carlo Calabrese and Brian Smith slid ahead of him in the depth chart. The injury is another bit of bad luck for the Southern California product, who has struggled to stay healthy and had plenty of opportunities this spring to get an extended look.

Down to two scholarship running backs, the Irish fielded open tryouts for walk-ons, as running backs coach Tim Hinton broke down the current depth chart.

“We have five total,” Hinton said. “Derry Herlihy (a walk-on from last year’s team) has come back and helped us out, and obviously the new guy (Tyler Plantz, of Providence Catholic school in In Lenox, Illinois). It’s an interesting room. I’m coaching my rear end off, it’s a lot of fun. Because three of the five really don’t know a lot, we are working the heck out of those guys.

“Here’s what coaching them in the spring does, it makes them better scout players in the fall. And the better our scout teams are, the better our No. 1 defense is.”

The injury to Roberson certainly hurts the depth of the Irish backfield and two scholarship running backs isn’t an ideal allocation of your roster. That said, there’s no real reason to panic (yet), as Cam McDaniel’s arrival this summer gets the numbers back to an appropriate, albeit thin, place. While most recruitniks doubt McDaniel has the chops to be a three down running back, it’s clear that the coaching staff is confident in his abilities.

McDonald enters his senior season snake-bit, and the pectoral injury likely limits his ability to weight train and continue to add the needed bulk and strength to contribute on the inside. Even with Te’o limited and McDonald out, there’s a good group of linebackers competing for playing time.

Irish redshirts ready themselves for competition

Dayne Crist and Louis Nix

More than a few people were surprised when Brian Kelly announced early during his first spring practices that freshman Zack Martin was working with the first-team offensive line at left tackle. At the time, Martin was a little known commodity, so far off the radar that even the official roster had his name spelled wrong — swapping in a ‘h’ for the ‘k’ at the end of his first name.

But that’s what happens with freshman that stay off the field during their first season on campus. They’re largely forgotten, relegated to a season on the practice squad and a year physically and mentally preparing for life in college athletics.

After spending their freshman seasons watching, nine Irish football players will prepare to take their first meaningful snaps as they reinsert themselves into the depth chart. Quarterbacks Andrew Hendrix and Luke Massa will fight to be among the four signal-callers getting reps during spring ball. Running back Cameron Roberson will walk into a depth-chart shy Robert Hughes and Armando Allen and look to build on an impressive freshman season where his work on the scout team earned him postseason honors as offensive scout team player of the year. Alex Welch, seeing another Elder High School graduate, Kyle Rudolph, leave for the NFL after three seasons, now finds himself square in the middle of a positional battle that’s headlined by Tyler Eifert and fifth-year player Mike Ragone. Christian Lombard, one of Notre Dame’s first commitments to the 2010 recruiting class, will head into battle for an open guard position vacated by Chris Stewart.

On the defensive side of the ball, Bruce Heggie, who spent last season adding considerable bulk to his already impressive frame enters the depth chart at defensive end. Justin Utupo, who started the trend of the Irish nabbing the Los Angeles Times’ lineman of the year, likely enters an outside linebacker competition that’s lost Brian Smith and Kerry Neal from the fold. Kendall Moore, who drew rave reviews for his play at inside linebacker on the scout team, now enters the battle to play opposite Manti Te’o. And Louis Nix, after seeing his weight balloon above 350 pounds, now takes his massive physique to the interior of the defensive line, where he’ll try to fill the void left by senior Ian Williams.

Earlier in the week, ESPN’s Bruce Feldman took a look nationally at the most anticipated redshirt freshmen in the land, and ranked Nix No. 7 in the country, quite the compliment for a nose tackle that had many recruitniks salivating last year. Here’s what he had to say about Nix, who committed to the Irish and assistant coach Tony Alford while Notre Dame was without a head coach.

7. Louis Nix, NT, Notre Dame Fighting Irish

We’ve heard all about how much Notre Dame has upgraded the edges of its 3-4 defense with the newcomers it just signed to its 2011 class. But the next question is: How about that middle? The Irish have been desperate for some big, dynamic bodies in the interior of their defensive line for a while now, and Nix may become the kind of big-time tackle they’ve been missing.

With reliable Ian Williams graduated, there is plenty of room for somebody to step in. The question now is whether Nix, who had to get in much better shape after signing last year as a freshman, ready to consistently bring the kind of effort defensive coordinator Bobby Diaco will demand? The buzz surrounding Nix from inside the program has been pretty good, but only time will tell.

While Nix is the only freshman getting national hype, it’ll be very interesting to see where guys like Roberson and Moore end up in the depth chart, as they both impressed the coaching staff all year with their performances on the scout team. The same can be said for a quarterback like Hendrix, who has wowed the coaching staff with his measureables, but just hasn’t played a lot of football in the spread. Early last season, Kelly openly considered taking the redshirt off Alex Welch and getting him into the lineup and while he didn’t do that, Welch will probably leap-frog a guy like Ragone as a pass-catcher, though how often he plays in two tight end sets will depend on how well he’s able to block at the point of attack. After Martin’s ascension into the starting lineup after a redshirt season, it should surprise no one if Lombard makes a run at the guard position that’s open.

With a little over a month to go before spring practice kicks off, a storyline to keep your eye on is which of these nine end up making a leap like Martin did into the headlines. If it turns out anywhere near as successful as it did for Zack, then Kelly and his coaching staff will be very happy.


Floyd and Smith named captains for 2011

Harrison Smith

Saturday’s Notre Dame Football Awards Show gave us plenty to discuss, but the headline was probably Brian Kelly naming Michael Floyd and Harrison Smith the captains of the 2011 Fighting Irish.

For Smith, that means his application for a fifth year has been accepted. For Floyd, it’s a permanent accolade after being named game captain more times than any other teammate last season. It’s an amazing leap for Harrison, who had been dogged by fans and coaches for his inconsistent play and arrested development thanks to continual position switches and misuse in Jon Tenuta’s 4-3 scheme.

If you’ve got a spare 100 minutes, head over to UND.com to watch the entire awards show, which included a tuxedo with a gold tie on Kelly and even fancy clip packages befitting of a red carpet extravaganza.

Here’s a quick breakdown of the awards given:

Offensive Scout Team Player of the Week: Cameron Roberson
Defensive Scout Team Player of the Week: Kendall Moore
Offensive Newcomer of the Year: Tyler Eifert
Defensive Newcomer of the Year: Prince Shembo
Special Teams Player of the Year: Bennett Jackson
Nick Pietrosante Award (Most Inspirational): Robert Hughes
Moose Krause Award (Lineman of the Year): Ian Williams
Guardian of the Year (Offensive Lineman of the Year): Zack Martin
Rockne Student Athlete Award: David Ruffer
Next Man In Award: Tommy Rees
Most Valuable Player: Michael Floyd

If you’re looking for a reason why the coaching staff isn’t too worried about losing Robert Hughes and Armando Allen, it could be Roberson, who has gotten nothing but positive reviews from the coaching staff. He’s a much more powerful back that Cierre Wood, and it’s likely he’ll immediately push for playing time, fighting Jonas Gray for the No. 2 spot.

The fact that Kendall Moore made such a nice splash on the practice field has to have people excited about adding another impact player in the middle of the defense. Last year, the Irish were in a very tough spot when Carlo Calabrese went down with an injury and by the end of the year, Manti Te’o was the one player on defense that was absolutely irreplaceable. Adding a guy like Moore to the middle will add some much needed depth behind Te’o and whoever wins the other inside position.

Eifert, Shembo, and Jackson are no-brainer choices. Eifert’s ascension to the starting job and his incredibly bright future are amazing when many of us wrote him off after a major back injury. Shembo’s 4.5 sacks were great production from the edge, especially considering coaches admitted he only knew a fraction of what was needed to play outside linebacker in the 3-4 system. Edge players like Ishaq Williams and Shembo should help ratchet up the pass rush opportunities next season. Jackson’s play on special teams was incredible. His first three plays on the football field ended with Jackson making tackles and he added explosive speed to the return game as well.

Hughes winning the Pietrosante Award is a fitting finish to a wonderful career for the senior. During Hughes’ freshman season, his 24-year-old brother Earl was murdered on Chicago’s West Side. While he certainly had a seesaw career, he ended it with a bang, carrying the Irish down the stretch, including the game-winning touchdown against USC and 27 tough carries against Miami in the bowl game. Hughes’ leadership was evident by the respect he earned from his teammates, who applauded loudly when he was given the game ball after the victory against the Trojans.

While Ian Williams being named defensive lineman of the year was expected, the fact that Zack Martin graded out as the most consistent lineman of the year was pretty astounding. Martin sat out last season, and was such an afterthought that his name was misspelled ‘Zach’ up until he was named the starting left tackle during spring ball. While many expected big things out of Trevor Robinson and Chris Stewart, they struggled on the interior of the line while Martin seemed to thrive at both left tackle and at right when Taylor Dever went down.

Having a 3.92 GPA and a perfect regular season kicking field goals should be good enough to win a scholarship, and Kelly confirmed it on Friday before naming Ruffer the student-athlete of the year. It’s amazing how far Ruffer has come this season. After the opening win against Purdue, Ruffer was made available to the press and I spent 10 minutes chatting with him because nobody else was talking with him. It was there I learned that he’d never kicked a field goal as long as the one he made against Purdue in his life because he’d never actually played any football before coming to ND. All that was well before Ruffer’s Lou Groza run, and the best statistical season of any Irish kicker.

Tommy Rees personified the Irish coaching staff’s philosophy of “Next Man In,” and his 4-0 stretch run and solid play against Tulsa made this spring’s quarterback competition interesting. While his raw skills probably rank near the bottom of the QB position, he’s got moxie and guts that defy his tenure at Notre Dame. Whether he has a long career as the Irish starting quarterback or ends up falling behind the other five quarterbacks on the roster, Rees should be remembered for some absolute heroics when the team needed it most.

The night’s final award went to Michael Floyd, who led the team in touchdowns, receptions and yards. While his performance this season left something to be desired by NFL scouts, it was clear that he was the sole engine that drove the Irish offense. Unlike the rest of the award winners, after Floyd won the MVP, both Kelly and his teammates asked for a speech, which Floyd reluctantly gave. It didn’t entail much more than a few nervous chuckles and a half-dozen thank yous, but it was a great moment for a football player that’ll lead the charge into 2011, a year that holds a lot of promise.