Chris Brown

Five Irish players sign UFA contracts

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Notre Dame had seven players selected in the 2016 NFL Draft, trailing only Ohio State, Clemson and UCLA on the weekend tally. But after the draft finished, the Irish had five more players get their shot at playing on Sundays.

Chris Brown signed with the Dallas Cowboys. Romeo Okwara will begin his career with the New York Giants. Matthias Farley and Amir Carlisle signed contracts with the Arizona Cardinal. Elijah Shumate agreed to a contract with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

After missing two seasons, Ishaq Williams will be at Giants rookie camp next weekend as well, working as a tryout player. Expect Jarrett Grace to receive similar opportunities.

Count me among those that thought both Brown and Okwara would hear their names called. Brown’s senior season, not to mention his intriguing measureables, had some projecting him as early as the fifth round.

Okwara, still 20 years old and fresh off leading Notre Dame in sacks in back-to-back seasons, intrigued a lot of teams with his ability to play both defensive end and outside linebacker. He’ll get a chance to make the Giants—the team didn’t draft a defensive end after selecting just one last year, and they’re in desperate need of pass rushers.

Both Shumate and Farley feel like contenders to earn a spot on rosters, both because of their versatility and special teams skills. Shumate played nickel back as a freshman and improved greatly at safety during 2015. Farley bounced around everywhere and was Notre Dame’s special teams captain.

Carlisle might fit a similar mold. He played running back, receiver and returned kicks and punts throughout his college career. With a 4.4 during Notre Dame’s Pro Day, he likely showed the Cardinals enough to take a shot, and now he’ll join an offense with Michael Floyd and Troy Niklas.

 

Counting down the Irish: 20-16

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For those getting caught up, start here. Then, check out the players who just missed the cut. Our rankings start with No. 25-21

 

We kicked off our list with five candidates for a breakout season. Our next installment seems to be doing one better: All five players have already started football games (or in one case, a game), now the goal is to become dominant performers.

For some, it’s still a learning process. We saw that with Nyles Morgan in 2014, a young linebacker prone to mistakes but still capable of making the big play. For others like Chris Brown and Elijah Shumate, 2015 constitutes a final season to perform, with the hope that three seasons of experience will result in a breakthrough.

We saw game-breaking moments from a player like Corey Robinson. We also saw Mike McGlinchey step into the starting lineup and thrive, surviving a mid-game relief appearance against USC’s Leonard Williams before performing more-than-admirably against LSU.

The depth on Notre Dame’s roster begins to show itself in this installment, with all five players capable of putting together very big seasons.

 

2015 IRISH TOP 25 RANKINGS

25. Jerry Tillery, DL
24. Greg Bryant, RB
23. Durham Smythe, TE
22. Matthias Farley, DB
21. Quenton Nelson, LG

 

Notre Dame v Arizona State
Notre Dame v Arizona StateChristian Petersen/Getty Images

20. Nyles Morgan (LB, Sophomore): No, it wasn’t always pretty. But Morgan’s baptism by fire should help as he moves into his sophomore season. In limited playing time subbing in for an injured Joe Schmidt, Morgan managed to make 47 tackles, the eighth most of any freshman at Notre Dame in the program’s history.

Morgan’s big play potential is obvious. He managed 3.5 TFLs in his four starts, three more than Joe Schmidt managed during his MVP (as voted by peers and coaches) campaign.

A big, fast and mean linebacker, Morgan will compete with Schmidt and Jarrett Grace for time in the middle of the defense. And if he’s able to take the next step from a mental prospective, there’s a chance that Morgan can see the field at the same time as Schmidt and Jaylon Smith, giving the Irish a linebacking corps that should be incredibly productive.

Highest Ranking: 17th. Lowest Ranking: Unranked (three ballots).

 

Chris Brown, Adoree Jackson
Chris Brown, Adoree JacksonAP Photo/Mark J. Terrill

19. Chris Brown (WR, Senior): For two seasons, Brown’s 50-yard catch against Oklahoma served as the singular highlight on the receiver’s resume. But in 2014, he showed shades of becoming a complete player, serving as a capable No. 2, even if it still only happened in spurts .

But as a senior, inconsistency won’t cut it. And playing across from Will Fuller, that type of productive should be a given. So if you’re looking for a candidate to step forward in a receiving group that doesn’t lose a body, Brown is an odds-on-favorite.

He’s big (nearly 6-foot-2) and fast (a high-school sprinter and national record-setter in the triple jump). He’s also finally understanding what it takes to be a consistent performer in Brian Kelly’s offense, though 39 catches and 548 yards is just a start. Somebody has to help take the attention off of Fuller. And Brown is the type of veteran leader who should get one of the first chances to do it.

Highest Ranking: 16th. Lowest Ranking: Unranked (three ballots).

 

Purdue v Notre Dame
Purdue v Notre DameMichael Hickey/Getty Images

18. Elijah Shumate (S, Senior): After an impressive freshman season where Shumate helped the 2012 defense as a slot cornerback, the veteran safety battled injuries during a mostly lost sophomore season and then struggled with the transition into Brian VanGorder’s defense in 2014. Still, he started 11 games and played in all 13, finishing third on the team in tackles with 66, chipping in a game-ending interception against Michigan to score a touchdown that counted everywhere but the scoreboard.

But that’s not the type of productivity that’ll get things done at the back end, and Shumate spent too much of last season not fully grasping his role in the Irish defense. But Shumate had a strong spring and is expected to put together a much more impressive final season in South Bend.

Capable of playing near the line of scrimmage and one of the team’s toughest hitters, the 213-pounder will be armed with another season of knowledge in VanGorder’s system.  Hopefully that unlocks a smashmouth playmaker who’ll cause trouble for quarterbacks and strike fear into receivers.

Highest Ranking: 11th. Lowest Ranking: Unranked (two ballots).

 

Ronald Darby,Corey Robinson
Ronald Darby,Corey RobinsonAP Photo/Mark Wallheiser

17. Corey Robinson (WR, Junior): Robinson played the game of his career against Florida State, nearly completing the touchdown hat trick and pulling out a historic win if it weren’t for a dubious offensive pass interference call. And while he had a few other clutch moments in 2014, there’s a consistency that still needs to be added to Robinson’s game if he’s going to take the next step as a receiver.

There’s reason to believe that he can. Robinson put together an impressive sophomore season even after playing most of the year with a fractured thumb. That neutralized one of Robinson’s best traits, a pair of velcro hands, as he continued to evolve as a route runner and grow comfortable with a body that seems to have sprouted well past his listed 6-foot-4.5 height.

A year after being named a first-team Academic All-American and Notre Dame’s Rockne Student-Athlete of the Year, it’s time for Robinson to emerge as a true red zone weapon—not to mention a complete receiver—as he looks to round out his game.

Highest Ranking: 17th. Lowest Ranking: 22nd.

 

16. Mike McGlinchey (RT, Junior): The jump Notre Dame’s starting right tackle made in the rankings from 2014 gives you an idea of his upside. And for all the talk about Ronnie Stanley and his chances to be the potential top pick in 2016, some think McGlinchey could offer much of the same thing at offensive tackle, a scary proposition if true.

At a shade under 6-foot-8, McGlinchey has the mass and length needed to be a prototype tackle. And we’ve heard more than enough from Brian Kelly to understand that McGlinchey’s best asset might be his athleticism.

While Christian Lombard did his best to gut out a tough final season in South Bend as he battled back injuries, McGlinchey sat on the bench. He was the odd-man out after spending last spring as Notre Dame’s projected right tackle, only to see Steve Elmer slide outside during fall camp. Even after that experiment failed, Harry Hiestand and Kelly decided to stick with a veteran like Lombard, though after seeing McGlinchey play when Lombard’s back finally gave out, he seemed more than ready for action.

Entering his third season in the program, McGlinchey is getting his chance. And the physical roadgrader should have a very good season.

Highest Ranking: 10th. Lowest Ranking: Unranked (one ballot).

 

***

Our 2015 Irish Top 25 panel
Keith Arnold, Inside the Irish
Bryan DriskellBlue & Gold
Matt Freeman, Irish Sports Daily
Nick Ironside, Irish 247
Tyler James, South Bend Tribune
Michael Bryan, One Foot Down
Pete Sampson, Irish Illustrated
Jude Seymour, Her Loyal Sons
JJ Stankevitz, CSN Chicago
John Vannie, NDNation
John Walters, Newsweek 

Irish A-to-Z: Chris Brown

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Chris Brown enters his senior season in South Bend, still looking to build on a magical start. When the lanky South Carolina native arrived on campus, he was a designated deep threat — used to perfection against Oklahoma on one of the season’s defining plays.

His career hasn’t lived up to that moment, and last year’s promising campaign had a few bad ones as well (let’s just say Brown isn’t going to be handling any more jet sweep carries at the goal line). But 39 catches and 548 yards are a season to build on, and word out of spring practice showcased a different type of player, one likely with a sense of urgency.

An elite track and field athlete—Brown would’ve won the Big East’s Triple Jump title as a high school junior—there’s a lot to like about the South Carolina native. So let’s take a look at what to expect from the veteran leader of the wide receiving corps.

 

CHRIS BROWN
6’1.5″ 195 lbs.
Senior, No. 2, WR

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

His senior season was shortened by injuries, but Brown’s athleticism was displayed on the track, a national record setter in the triple jump and a 10.8 100-meter dash. He was viewed as a three-star prospect, but Notre Dame beat out home state South Carolina and Steve Spurrier for Brown’s signature and he took an official visit to Alabama, and Kelly wasn’t shy about his belief in Brown on Signing Day.

“If we were talking from an NFL standpoint and I was the general manager after draft day, we would consider this young man a steal of the draft,” Kelly said on Signing Day 2012. “We believe he has a skill set that we do not have currently on this football team.”

 

PLAYING CAREER

Freshman Season (2012): Saw action in all 12 games. Started two. First catch of his career was a 50-yarder against Oklahoma. Also made a six-yard grab against Wake Forest.

Sophomore Season (2013): Started four games while appearing in all 13. Season-long catch of 40-yards against Purdue. Caught his first touchdown against Air Force. Totaled 15 catches for 209 yards and one touchdown.

Junior Season (2014): Started 11 of 13 games last season, putting up career high in catches and yards. Had nine catches of 20 yards or longer. Had career best 82 yards on two catches against Navy.
WHAT WE PROJECTED LAST YEAR

I was skeptical that Brown was ready to take the leap last season and I turned out to be mostly right, especially considering DaVaris Daniels’ absence opened things up for Brown.

This prediction is completely dependent on a few key variables: First, the explosiveness that we’re hoping to see from the Irish offense in 2014, namely quarterback Everett Golson’s ability to hit big plays down the field. If that’s the case, then expect Brown to be one of the main beneficiaries.

Secondly, it’s dependent on Brown cleaning up his game. In a stable of sure-handed pass catchers, Brown stood out for a few careless drops. There was also the end zone interception against Pitt where Brown wasn’t competitive on the route. Those types of things are fatal in a Brian Kelly offense, and will get you taken off the field.

Perhaps we were expecting too much from Brown early, the product of remembering one singular play in a season where he only made two catches. Brown played his best in the Pinstripe Bowl, rebounding from the disappointment against Pitt and capitalizing on the opportunity after a month of practice.

I’m not entirely convinced that Brown is any better than the fourth receiver in this offense, and that doesn’t take into consideration slot players C.J. Prosise and Amir Carlisle. But if this offense runs optimally, there should be catches and touchdowns to go around, for Daniels, Fuller, Robinson and Brown.

We’ll know if the resurgent spring was coachspeak and the bowl game simply a data point come this fall. But Brown is the type of player that the Irish are counting on to help them score points, so his ascent could be crucial in 2014.

I think Brown turned his game around in 2014 after some early season struggles, becoming a key piece of the outside receiving game, pretty much pairing with Corey Robinson opposite Will Fuller. He made a big catch against LSU and played pretty well against USC in blowout circumstances.

 

UPSIDE POTENTIAL

Call me crazy, but there’s still plenty of upside for Brown. This is a big, strong, fast kid, who only just now has started to play big, strong and fast. And while I’ll be a fool to fall for it, talking with Jac Collinsworth—pretty much the only media member who had a look at every spring practice—he couldn’t stop raving about the performances he saw from Brown in practice.

I still think Chris Brown has NFL potential as a receiver, especially when he runs a 4.4 and jumps out of the gym at pro day. But if he can’t shake the inconsistency that’s defined his game so far in his senior season, than it’s never going to happen.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

We’ve watched veterans step forward under Brian Kelly and play very good football. And I actually believe this is going to happen with Brown. Will Fuller has nowhere to hide next season, as defenses are going to be hyperaware of his spot on the field before every snap. So that should automatically lead to some preferred matchups for Brown, situations he needs to win.

We’ve watched Brown fail to make the big play—a critical fumbled last year at the goal line, getting beat out for a ball in the end zone during Notre Dame’s loss to Pitt in 2013. But we also saw him climb the ladder to convert a big 3rd down against LSU, and break off big chunks of yardage when given the opportunity.

TJ Jones went from a 649 yard junior season to a ridiculous 1,108, nine-touchdown senior year. I’m not predicting that type of output for Jones—I just don’t think he’s going to get the touches. But at the same time, I think a eight touchdown, 800-yard season is in the cards, with a 15-plus-yard-per-catch average happening.

 

THE 2015 IRISH A-to-Z
Josh Adams, RB
Josh Barajas, OLB
Nicky Baratti, S
Alex Bars, OL
Asmar Bilal, OLB
Hunter Bivin, OL
Grant Blankenship, DE
Jonathan Bonner, DE
Miles Boykin, WR
Justin Brent, WR

 

Post-spring stock report: Wide Receivers

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What a difference a year makes.

After DaVaris Daniels‘ career was ended during the Frozen Five debacle, Notre Dame’s receiving depth chart had exactly one catch to pair with Everett Golson, a 50-yard heave against Oklahoma that still serves as the biggest play of Chris Brown‘s career.

Yet even with a group of unproven receivers, in 2014 the Irish passing offense was the most prolific of the Kelly era, with sophomore Will Fuller emerging as Notre Dame’s most prolific sophomore in school history. Joined by a supporting cast that was more than viable, the entire unit returns for 2015, making this position group—even before the infusion of four intriguing freshman—one of the roster’s great strengths.

Let’s take a look at where this group stands after spring practice with a look at the depth chart and stock report.

 

POST-SPRING DEPTH CHART

X: Will Fuller, Jr. (6-0, 180)
W: Chris Brown, Sr. (6-1.5, 195)
Z: Amir Carlisle, GS (5-10, 192)

X: Torii Hunter, Jr.* (6-0, 190)
W: Corey Robinson, Jr. (6-4.5, 215)
Z: C.J. Prosise, Sr.* (6-.5, 220)

X: Corey Holmes, Soph.* (6-.5, 184)
W: Justin Brent, Soph. (6-1.5, 205)

*Denotes fifth-year of eligibility.

 

STOCK UP

C.J. Prosise: Even if his stock is on the rise as a running back, Prosise cemented his place among the top 11 players on the offense, a lofty place to be when you consider the talent piling up. Capable of being a true crossover player, expect to see Prosise all over the field, wreaking havoc on defensive coordinators while keeping opponents honest as they try to account for Will Fuller.

Even if his biggest move this spring wasn’t at wide receiver, Prosise had a huge spring.

 

Will Fuller: This was the type of spring where you could almost expect an established player to take it easy. But even with a cast on his hand, Fuller’s long touchdown during the Blue-Gold game served as a reminder that the Irish’s most dangerous weapon is only going to improve in 2015.

There was plenty of work to be done for Fuller this spring, with him learning to play as a marked man in 2015. And as Mike Denbrock aptly said this spring, Fuller can be as good as he wants to be. The good news? He expects to be better—and that showed this spring.

 

Chris Brown: I’m taking this one on a hunch from UND.com’s Jac Collinsworth. So maybe this is the year where the light goes on for Brown. And as he approaches his final season in South Bend, let’s hope it is.

Physically, there’s nothing not to like about Brown. He’s filled out his frame, but is still the speedster that got behind the Oklahoma secondary. And after an uneven three seasons, it appears that Brown understands the type of consistency that’s demanded from him.

Projecting Brown’s numbers in 2015 is a difficult proposition. But with Fuller likely pulling a safety over the top and Notre Dame’s ground game keeping opponents honest, there’s absolutely no reason that Brown can’t have a monster year.

 

Torii Hunter: For all the talk of Hunter spending this spring with the baseball team, at the time of the Blue-Gold game, Hunter had a whopping three at-bats, giving you an idea as to where his future lies. That’s on the football field, and Hunter spent the spring reminding people that he’s got a chance to be a very productive college player.

Hunter’s versatility is ultimately what led me to give him the final “buy” grade. And as Prosise spends time in the backfield, Hunter could take some of those snaps, though he’s capable of playing both inside and out for the Irish.

Ultimately, there’s only one football. And even if I’m struggling to find catches for Hunter, he did his best to remind the coaching staff that he’s deserving of a few more.

 

STOCK NEUTRAL

Justin Brent: As much as I wanted to elevate this grade to a buy, I’m still skeptical of Brent’s ascent—considering he had to dig himself out of quite a hole after last season’s off-field escapades to just get back to neutral. So credit the young player for working hard this spring, and scoring a nice touchdown in the Blue-Gold game.

With perhaps the most imposing physique in the wide receivers room, Brent looks like an upperclassman. But if he wants to see the field he’s going to have to start thinking and behaving like one, both on and off the field. Consider this spring a step in the right direction, but I’m going to have to see more before going all-in.

 

Corey Robinson: Nagging injuries took Robinson out of the mix this spring. And while he’s still developing into a complete wide receiver, there are really bigger worries than Robinson not getting the most out of 15 spring practices.

Still, it’s Robinson’s third season in the program. After a nice sophomore campaign, he’s an upperclassman now, and it’s time to see the flashes of brilliance turn into consistent play. With a stacked depth chart his numbers might not explode, but situationally the Irish have a huge weapon with Robinson’s Spiderman hands and Inspector Gadget arms. Now he’s got to make the leap.

 

Amir Carlisle: For all the wonder if Carlisle was even coming back for a fifth year, the grad student earned nothing but praise from Brian Kelly for his work this spring. And it really shouldn’t be a surprise considering his successful transition to the slot receiver spot last year.

Carlisle may not be the electric running back most had pegged when he transferred from USC. But he’ll give opponents problems in space and should get his opportunities down the middle of the field.

 

Corey Holmes: The depth chart might not allow it, but Holmes showed a promising future this spring. With a silky smooth game that was reminiscent of a young TJ Jones, Holmes went up and made a tough catch down the middle of the field in the Blue-Gold game, a nice reward for a young guy with four seasons of eligibility remaining.

It’ll be up to Holmes to create urgency for his career, because the depth chart isn’t all that giving. But there’s a fine technical receiver ready for his opportunity, and its up to him to create it in 2015.

 

STOCK DOWN

Empty. 

 

OVERALL TREND

Buy. This might be my favorite position group on the roster, and that’s without considering what Miles Boykin, Jalen Guyton, CJ Sanders and Equanimeous St. Brown on campus yet.

Put simply, this group is miles from the ones that surrounded Michael Floyd early in Kelly’s tenure. The Irish staff isn’t lacking a viable No. 2 to put across from All-American candidate Will Fuller, it’s trying to figure out who to keep off the field.

Ultimately, the receivers production will come down to how this offense wants to operate. Expect the big plays to go up, even if the yardage and catch numbers go down. And if Malik Zaire gets more time on the field, it’ll be a ton of deep balls and a lot more running — with passing totals closer to his LSU numbers than a standard Everett Golson aerial attack.

But from top to bottom, next year’s roster—and really, if Fuller stays, the 2016 roster as well—could be the most talented group of wide receivers to be on campus together at Notre Dame. So I’m expecting big things from this group.

Spring solutions: Wide receivers

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A position that looked like a huge question mark entering the 2014 season ended the year with an embarrassment of riches. After watching Will Fuller emerge with a record-setting sophomore season, the loss of DaVaris Daniels and departure of TJ Jones didn’t do anything to slow the Irish passing game down.

Entering spring practice, Notre Dame’s wide receivers are no longer the emerging kids. They’re a position group that needs to take its place among the most talented in college football.

In Fuller, the Irish have an All-American candidate. In Corey Robinson, a matchup problem set to break loose after a trying season. CJ Prosise proved dangerous in the slot. Chris Brown stepped forward as well.

With Mike Denbrock doing a great job developing young talent, the next step is a competitive spring where the depth chart returns intact.

For all the focus on the running game heading out of the Music City Bowl victory, consider this your reminder that the Irish receiving corps is stacked.

 

WIDE RECEIVER DEPTH CHART

1. Will Fuller, Jr.
2. Corey Robinson, Jr.
3. Chris Brown, Sr.
4. C.J. Prosise, Sr.*
5. Amir Carlisle, Grad Student
6. Torii Hunter, Jr., Jr.*
7. Corey Holmes, Soph.*
8. Justin Brent, Soph.

*Denotes fifth-year of eligibility available.

 

SPRING OBJECTIVES

Will Fuller: For as impressive as Fuller’s season was, imagine if he just did a better job of making the ordinary play. Fuller had the most impressive sophomore season in school history, tying Jeff Samardzija and Golden Tate’s single-season touchdown record while also setting marks for catches, yards and scores for a sophomore.

But Fuller still played with a level of inconsistency befitting of a young player coming off an nearly anonymous freshman campaign, not one of college football’s top playmakers.

Expect spring to mark the start of Fuller’s commitment to every-down excellence. You got the feeling Brian Kelly was demanding that from his rising star in 2014 (go listen to some of his postgame comments after the sophomore disappeared at times), and you know he’ll do the same next year.

The stakes are raised: No longer will Fuller catch opponents by surprise. So his game will need to elevate, and spring and offseason workouts is when that process begins in earnest.

Corey Robinson: Considering Robinson played the entire season with a fracture in his thumb, his sophomore campaign was plenty good. And while it’s hard to say an Academic All-American season with 40 catch and five touchdowns is off the radar, the attention paid to Fuller could open things up for Robinson.

Robinson made his share of clutch catches—even considering the game-winner that was taken away—converting a few heroic fourth downs while rising to the occasion. And as he’s continues learning how to become a complete receiver, expect Robinson’s junior year to be a breakout.

Chris Brown: After being highly touted after an impressive spring, Brown was invisible early last season. But after working with the coaching staff and utilizing some fancy GPS gizmos to diagnose part of the problem, Brown nearly matched Robinson’s production in every category but touchdowns.

Entering his final season in South Bend, Brown is still the type of freaky athlete who will run past defensive backs and make a play that’ll have you saying, “Wow.” But he’ll need to play 2015 with a sense of urgency that hasn’t existed in the past, as it’s a competitive depth chart and his professional future likely depends on a big season.

C.J. Prosise: That Notre Dame’s 220-pound converted safety was also the team’s leader in yards-per-catch tells you something about the unique athlete Notre Dame has in Prosise.

Also the team’s special teams player of the year as a gunner, Prosise could be unveiled in a number of different ways when Mike Sanford realizes the weapon he has in Prosise.

If there were more footballs to go around, Prosise would be my pick to click in 2015. For all the message board chatter thinking Prosise could help the safety depth chart, go back and look what he’s doing for the offense.

Nobody but Fuller made more big-chunk plays than Prosise. The best is yet to come.

Amir Carlisle: Considering he made the transition from running back, Carlisle’s season was a success, looking natural as a receiver and making some big plays throughout the year.

At his best (against Michigan and Arizona State), Carlisle was a handful in space, utilizing his speed and quickness to make big plays from the slot. But entering his final season of eligibility, Carlisle looks best suited for a complementary role, and could be a candidate for showing some positional flexibility with depth numbers low at running back heading into 2015.

Carlisle’s more than a useful player, and that versatility could pay off. And after battling hard-luck injuries for the better part of two years, it was good to see Carlisle make it through a season and contribute.

Torii Hunter Jr.: The fact that Hunter is spending time with the baseball team this spring shouldn’t surprise anybody. But it would be a surprise if it got in the way of his contributions to the football team.

Kelly needs to award players who excel in the class room and do what’s asked of them. Hunter has done that off the field. Expect that transition to begin to excelling on the field in 2015.

There’s nobody who needs to do more this spring to establish himself in the depth chart than Hunter, a versatile receiver who showed glimpses of being all the way back after a really difficult injury.

What the Irish have in Hunter remains to be seen. He’s capable of playing in the slot and outside. He’s showed nice speed and quickness. But a career-game of two catches and 24 yards means he’s got work to do, especially with the athletes both in front and behind him.

Corey Holmes: After serving as the opponent’s No. 1 receiver on the scout team, Holmes now enters a depth chart stacked with competition. After seeing the field twice early, Holmes saved eligibility, though found out what it takes to play.

Now we’ll see how that early lesson worked. Built like Fuller, Holmes has what we think is a perfect skill-set to take on a role in the Irish offense, but he’ll fight uphill to get his opportunity.

With a quarterbacking duel expected in the starting lineup, Holmes’ chemistry with DeShone Kizer might be the best thing he has going for him. If he can make plays against Brian VanGorder’s defense in practice, he’ll get the eyes of everybody needed, finding his way into the mix from there.

Justin Brent: It’s a critical time in Brent’s development. After making headlines for all of the wrong reasons, Brent has the opportunity to reboot his career this spring, or he’ll continue to find himself veering into territory that usually ends with a transfer.

A position shift also feels like something that deserves at the very least a tire kick. After playing in nine games last season on special teams, Brent’s physicality and ability to mix it up could have him getting a look on defense. With a safety depth chart still waiting for Avery Sebastian, Nicco Fertitta and Mykelti Williams, there’s a need for bodies and Brent might be the latest player under Kelly’s watch to switch sides of the ball.

(Brent should feel lucky if that’s to happen. It’s worked out well for everybody who has done it so far.)