Tag: CJ Prosise

William Fuller, Julian Whigham, Durell Eskridge

Post-spring stock report: Wide Receivers


What a difference a year makes.

After DaVaris Daniels‘ career was ended during the Frozen Five debacle, Notre Dame’s receiving depth chart had exactly one catch to pair with Everett Golson, a 50-yard heave against Oklahoma that still serves as the biggest play of Chris Brown‘s career.

Yet even with a group of unproven receivers, in 2014 the Irish passing offense was the most prolific of the Kelly era, with sophomore Will Fuller emerging as Notre Dame’s most prolific sophomore in school history. Joined by a supporting cast that was more than viable, the entire unit returns for 2015, making this position group—even before the infusion of four intriguing freshman—one of the roster’s great strengths.

Let’s take a look at where this group stands after spring practice with a look at the depth chart and stock report.



X: Will Fuller, Jr. (6-0, 180)
W: Chris Brown, Sr. (6-1.5, 195)
Z: Amir Carlisle, GS (5-10, 192)

X: Torii Hunter, Jr.* (6-0, 190)
W: Corey Robinson, Jr. (6-4.5, 215)
Z: C.J. Prosise, Sr.* (6-.5, 220)

X: Corey Holmes, Soph.* (6-.5, 184)
W: Justin Brent, Soph. (6-1.5, 205)

*Denotes fifth-year of eligibility.



C.J. Prosise: Even if his stock is on the rise as a running back, Prosise cemented his place among the top 11 players on the offense, a lofty place to be when you consider the talent piling up. Capable of being a true crossover player, expect to see Prosise all over the field, wreaking havoc on defensive coordinators while keeping opponents honest as they try to account for Will Fuller.

Even if his biggest move this spring wasn’t at wide receiver, Prosise had a huge spring.


Will Fuller: This was the type of spring where you could almost expect an established player to take it easy. But even with a cast on his hand, Fuller’s long touchdown during the Blue-Gold game served as a reminder that the Irish’s most dangerous weapon is only going to improve in 2015.

There was plenty of work to be done for Fuller this spring, with him learning to play as a marked man in 2015. And as Mike Denbrock aptly said this spring, Fuller can be as good as he wants to be. The good news? He expects to be better—and that showed this spring.


Chris Brown: I’m taking this one on a hunch from UND.com’s Jac Collinsworth. So maybe this is the year where the light goes on for Brown. And as he approaches his final season in South Bend, let’s hope it is.

Physically, there’s nothing not to like about Brown. He’s filled out his frame, but is still the speedster that got behind the Oklahoma secondary. And after an uneven three seasons, it appears that Brown understands the type of consistency that’s demanded from him.

Projecting Brown’s numbers in 2015 is a difficult proposition. But with Fuller likely pulling a safety over the top and Notre Dame’s ground game keeping opponents honest, there’s absolutely no reason that Brown can’t have a monster year.


Torii Hunter: For all the talk of Hunter spending this spring with the baseball team, at the time of the Blue-Gold game, Hunter had a whopping three at-bats, giving you an idea as to where his future lies. That’s on the football field, and Hunter spent the spring reminding people that he’s got a chance to be a very productive college player.

Hunter’s versatility is ultimately what led me to give him the final “buy” grade. And as Prosise spends time in the backfield, Hunter could take some of those snaps, though he’s capable of playing both inside and out for the Irish.

Ultimately, there’s only one football. And even if I’m struggling to find catches for Hunter, he did his best to remind the coaching staff that he’s deserving of a few more.



Justin Brent: As much as I wanted to elevate this grade to a buy, I’m still skeptical of Brent’s ascent—considering he had to dig himself out of quite a hole after last season’s off-field escapades to just get back to neutral. So credit the young player for working hard this spring, and scoring a nice touchdown in the Blue-Gold game.

With perhaps the most imposing physique in the wide receivers room, Brent looks like an upperclassman. But if he wants to see the field he’s going to have to start thinking and behaving like one, both on and off the field. Consider this spring a step in the right direction, but I’m going to have to see more before going all-in.


Corey Robinson: Nagging injuries took Robinson out of the mix this spring. And while he’s still developing into a complete wide receiver, there are really bigger worries than Robinson not getting the most out of 15 spring practices.

Still, it’s Robinson’s third season in the program. After a nice sophomore campaign, he’s an upperclassman now, and it’s time to see the flashes of brilliance turn into consistent play. With a stacked depth chart his numbers might not explode, but situationally the Irish have a huge weapon with Robinson’s Spiderman hands and Inspector Gadget arms. Now he’s got to make the leap.


Amir Carlisle: For all the wonder if Carlisle was even coming back for a fifth year, the grad student earned nothing but praise from Brian Kelly for his work this spring. And it really shouldn’t be a surprise considering his successful transition to the slot receiver spot last year.

Carlisle may not be the electric running back most had pegged when he transferred from USC. But he’ll give opponents problems in space and should get his opportunities down the middle of the field.


Corey Holmes: The depth chart might not allow it, but Holmes showed a promising future this spring. With a silky smooth game that was reminiscent of a young TJ Jones, Holmes went up and made a tough catch down the middle of the field in the Blue-Gold game, a nice reward for a young guy with four seasons of eligibility remaining.

It’ll be up to Holmes to create urgency for his career, because the depth chart isn’t all that giving. But there’s a fine technical receiver ready for his opportunity, and its up to him to create it in 2015.






Buy. This might be my favorite position group on the roster, and that’s without considering what Miles Boykin, Jalen Guyton, CJ Sanders and Equanimeous St. Brown on campus yet.

Put simply, this group is miles from the ones that surrounded Michael Floyd early in Kelly’s tenure. The Irish staff isn’t lacking a viable No. 2 to put across from All-American candidate Will Fuller, it’s trying to figure out who to keep off the field.

Ultimately, the receivers production will come down to how this offense wants to operate. Expect the big plays to go up, even if the yardage and catch numbers go down. And if Malik Zaire gets more time on the field, it’ll be a ton of deep balls and a lot more running — with passing totals closer to his LSU numbers than a standard Everett Golson aerial attack.

But from top to bottom, next year’s roster—and really, if Fuller stays, the 2016 roster as well—could be the most talented group of wide receivers to be on campus together at Notre Dame. So I’m expecting big things from this group.

Irish A-to-Z: C.J. Prosise

C.J. Prosise

After arriving on campus as a safety, junior C.J. Prosise has made the switch to wide receiver, giving the Irish an intriguing athlete in the slot. Built like a linebacker with sprinter speed, it looked like Prosise was poised to make his mark in 2013 after a strong spring, but made only a modest impact on the 2013 offense.

Joined by Amir Carlisle at the Z, Prosise will have more opportunities as Brian Kelly opens up the Irish attack, hoping to turn one of the highlights of the Blue-Gold game into touchdowns that matters when it counts.

Let’s take a look at the Virginia native.


6’0.5″ 220 lbs.
Junior, No. 20



A three-star recruit with mostly regional offers, Prosise committed to the Irish in May, taking himself off the board early, after starring at Woodberry Forrest, opening the pipeline at the prep school that brought Doug Randolph and Greer Martini to South Bend.

But Prosise had some intriguing traits — a second-place finish in the 100m dash and seven return touchdowns — hinting at an athlete with plenty of explosiveness. Originally inked as a safety, Kelly talked about what excited him about Prosise on Signing Day 2012.

“He can return punts, kick offs, and when you’re talking about our defense he is somebody that can play half the field,” Kelly said. “He has to be a great tackler at times, he will be asked to play close to the line of scrimmage, he has the size and the athletic ability.”



Freshman Season (2012): Did not see action.

Sophomore Season (2013): Played in all 13 games as a wide receiver after making the position switch the previous spring. Made seven catches on the season, two coming against Rutgers in the Pinstripe Bowl. Made four tackles on special teams as well.



Notre Dame doesn’t have many athletes like Prosise, who moves really well for a 220-pounder at wide receiver. While he’s hardly the prototype at slot receiver, he serves as a perfect complement to Amir Carlisle, with a physicality and size that should be a difficult matchup for defenses.

It’s hard to think of Prosise and not think back to his impressive touchdown in the Blue-Gold game, where he burned past Austin Collinsworth and exploded into the end zone. That play captured what makes Prosise such an intriguing weapon, but also was what Kelly must have seen in practice at times that spring, as he challenged the rising junior to raise his game.

The Irish will play up to six receivers regularly this fall. It’s hard for me to see a way that Prosise doesn’t physically (at least talent-wise) fit into that group, though he’ll need to show some urgency as he enters his second year of competition at wide receiver.



At this point, how Kelly and Mike Denbrock distribute touches at wide receiver will likely dictate how productive Prosise is on Saturdays. Simply doubling his production from last year feels like the baseline expectation, though it shouldn’t be too much to ask of Prosise to improve on the relatively modest 10.3 yards per catch he had in 2013.

(Of course, if the kick returner job is still up for grabs with George Atkinson off to the NFL, Prosise might be able to do some damage from there.)

Ultimately, opening up the playbook could be the one thing that helps Prosise the most. If Notre Dame has the athletes, they need to find a way to get them the touches. At running back, that means finding the right mix for Tarean Folston, Greg Bryant and Cam McDaniel. At receiver, it means getting six or seven guys opportunities.

The slot has always been a spot that had Percy Harvin-like versatility. Outside of a few fly sweeps, we have yet to see that from the Irish. Kelly has the creativity. He’s also got the personnel, with a former running back in Carlisle playing there along with a 220-pounder who would be as the Irish’s biggest running back on the roster.

Let’s see if that’s a way to get Prosise involved in 2014.



The Irish A-to-Z
Josh Atkinson
Nicky Baratti
Alex Bars
Hunter Bivin
Grant Blankenship
Jonathan Bonner
Justin Brent
Kyle Brindza
Chris Brown
Jalen Brown
Greg Bryant
Devin Butler
Jimmy Byrne
Daniel Cage
Amir Carlisle
Austin Collinsworth
Ben Councell
Scott Daly
Sheldon Day
Michael Deeb
Steve Elmer
Matthias Farley
Tarean Folston
Will Fuller
Everett Golson
Jarrett Grace
Conor Hanratty
Eilar Hardy
Mark Harrell
Jay Hayes
Matt Hegarty
Mike Heuerman
Kolin Hill
Corey Holmes
Chase Hounshell
Torii Hunter Jr.
Jarron Jones
DeShone Kizer
Ben Koyack
Christian Lombard
Tyler Luatua
Cole Luke
Nick Martin
Greer Martini
Jacob Matuska
Cam McDaniel
Mike McGlinchey
Colin McGovern
Pete Mokwuah
John Montelus
Kendall Moore
Nyles Morgan
Sam Mustipher
Quenton Nelson
Tyler Newsome
Romeo Okwara
James Onwualu

Irish return to the practice field

Notre Dame v Air Force

After two weeks off, Notre Dame returned to the practice field this morning. With pads on and live snaps taking place, any rust seemed to be alleviated with the Irish playing live for the first time this spring.

With plenty of reports coming in live from various local outlets that got a limited look at practice from inside Loftus, let’s run you through some of the interesting reports that I’ve seen this morning.


First, let’s get to some of BK’s comments after practice.

Kelly talked about Notre Dame’s mediocre screen game, which was really good to hear after listening to hundreds of you bemoan the lack of creativity or productivity from that aspect of the offense. But with young offensive linemen learning their roles, it’s still very much a work in progress.

Kelly jokingly got off a pretty good dig on Steve Elmer, who is working at left guard next to Ronnie Stanley right now. The sophomore is doing a great job understanding his role at guard, but will use the spring to refine his game with offensive line coach Harry Hiestand.

“I think that’s obviously a tandem that is working well together on a day-to-day basis,” Kelly said of Stanley and Elmer. “We like what we see there. Steve is still learning the little. He knows big picture the offense very well. I think what Harry (Hiestand) is really trying to drill down with Steve is what he wants.

“Screens, for example, remember how lousy we were on screens? He’s worse. Things like that. He’s really trying to figure out some of the little nuances in the game. That’s the next step for him. Ronnie has done very well at that position. I think now for Elmer, really picking up the nuances.”

Before anybody thinks Kelly is calling out a player, he was joking first of all and secondly he’s also taking a shot at his own offense and it’s inability to capitalize on high percentage pass plays like screen passes. If that’s a focal point of this offensive transition under Mike Denbrock then that’s great news.


Staying on the offensive side of the ball, Kelly talked about one of last year’s spring heroes, C.J. Prosise. While that didn’t translate into a lot of success last season, Prosise is a really intriguing athlete, especially considering he weighs 220 pounds.

“C.J. Prosise is an outstanding athlete. I don’t like to call any guys out, but he can give us even more,” Kelly said.  I think if there’s a ceiling there, I think we can get more out of C.J.

“He doesn’t have a typical body type for that position, he’s a big kid. But he’s an extraordinary athlete. I think there’s more there and we’re seeing it. He’s got speed. He can catch the football, and we think he can be a really good blocker as an inside guy for us. He’s kind of a unique player at that position. You usually don’t get them big. I think he’s got a high ceiling as well.”

Prosise started in the secondary for the Irish, an obvious place for a 220 pound thumper who can run. But with the Irish shifting away from two tight end sets, Prosise could be a beneficiary in this offense.

Also receiving glowing reviews from Kelly was rising sophomore Will Fuller. After putting up a ridiculous 26.7 yards per catch average last year, Kelly all but said the sky was the limit for the Philadelphia native.

“Will Fuller, that kid is just a matter of how far he wants to take his talents,” Kelly said. “Weight room is going to be huge. Getting stronger. Attention to detail, all things that great players need to do. He’s a pretty good one.”

Some bozo last week said Fuller had the chance to be a 1,000 yard receiver this season. I’m feeling better about that prediction after hearing Kelly talk about Fuller.


It may be a surprise, but Jaylon Smith spent time at inside linebacker when the Irish went into a nickel package. Playing next to him was Joe Schmidt, while transitioning wide receiver James Onwualu also took some snaps there as well in the nickel set.

For Smith, it’s part of the transition to being the leading man of this defense. After playing primarily the dog outside linebacker spot last season, getting Smith into the middle of the action is just one part of utilizing the team’s best defensive playmaker.

“We’re finding that out right now as to what he can do,” Kelly said. “We’re overloading him quite frankly with a number of different looks.

“We don’t want offenses to know where he is. We’re going to play him in a number of different positions. He can be inside, outside, we’re moving him all over the place.”

Last year, the Irish passing defense really struggled on underneath routes, especially with Jarrett Grace, Carlo Calabrese and Dan Fox in coverage. In 2012, Manti Te’o made seven interceptions playing a glorified shallow center field for the Irish. Consider what Smith can do with his freakish speed and athleticism?

The move of Smith inside is likely as much a part of getting him in the center of the defense as it is about solidifying a clear weakness. A savvy and smart move that shows this staff did their homework during the offseason.



Here’s some great practice footage from IrishSportsDaily.com:


Here’s some more from our friends at IrishIllustrated.com, including a pick six by Joe Schmidt on Everett Golson:


Here are BK’s comments in their entirety, courtesy of UND.com:



Spring Solutions: Wide receivers and tight ends

Steffon Batts, Corey Robinson

Notre Dame headed into last season without a All-American candidate to catch the football. After a pretty incredible run at the position — from Jeff Samardzija-to-Golden Tate-to-Kyle Rudolph-to-Michael Floyd-to-Tyler Eifert — the Irish had TJ Jones to anchor the position, a solid yet far from spectacular veteran receiver.

Jones flourished in his final season in South Bend, putting together an MVP season as a more than respectable No. 1 wide receiver. But the Irish receiving corps also did its part to step up and move forward, with a nice sophomore season for DaVaris Daniels and impressive contributions by a trio of freshmen.

At tight end, life without Tyler Eifert wasn’t all that painful. Troy Niklas did enough in his lone season as a starter to make a move for the NFL. Ben Koyack put a dreadful sophomore season in the rearview mirror and became a model of productivity. With Tommy Rees at the helm of the offense, the Irish receiving corps put up better numbers than the 2012 edition, something most would’ve found next to impossible heading into the year.

With Jones and Niklas gone from their leading roles, and Daniels away from campus after some academic troubles, the wide receivers and tight ends will be a focus of spring. A talented but youthful personnel group must be ready to grow if the Irish are going to achieve their offensive goals.

Let’s take a look at the depth chart and some objectives over the next few months.


Luke Massa, GS
DaVaris Daniels, Sr.*
Chris Brown, Jr.
CJ Prosise, Jr.*
James Onwualu, Soph.
Corey Robinson, Soph.
Will Fuller, Soph.
Torii Hunter Jr., Soph.*
Justin Brent, Fr.

Ben Koyack, Sr.
Mike Heuerman, Soph.*
Durham Smythe, Soph.*

*Denotes fifth-year of eligibility available. 


Luke Massa: If there was a surprise fifth year candidate on this list, it was certainly Massa. But it goes to show you Brian Kelly’s belief in filling your roster with players that can help both on and off the field. Massa will likely return to be the holder on field goals, a job still his with Signing Day leaving a few roster slots open.

It’s still not fair to call Massa just another scholarship. He’s admitted that a serious knee injury put a damper on his wide receiving skills, a setback in spring practice in 2012 just as he was starting to get into the rhythm of a new position. (Massa was the third QB recruit in his class with Tommy Rees and Andrew Hendrix.) Massa has an intriguing body type and athleticism. He could be a solution if the Irish ever deploy an H-back. But just like Tyler Stockton last year, Massa will be a veteran presence that will likely make his biggest impact off the field.

Chris Brown: It appeared that Brown was in danger of being lapped by a youth movement on the roster, losing his spot at the designated deep threat in the Irish roster to Will Fuller. But Brown played a nice game against Rutgers, and he enters his spring at a crossroads in his career.

At his best, Brown is an explosive receiver with the ability to get behind a defense. He’s also a player that’s showed suspect hands and disappeared for stretches. Brown found himself the intended target of an endzone interception when he and Tommy Rees struggled to get on the same page. That was hardly a good thing.

This spring, there is no veteran receiver with more experience than Brown. He’s now that guy. It’ll be up to him to take on a leadership role at the position, growing into a veteran in a position room filled with youth.

CJ Prosise: After a big spring at slot receiver, Prosise managed just seven catches in 2013. The Irish offense tended to favor two-tight end sets with Troy Niklas and Ben Koyack over a Z receiver, likely limiting Prosise’s effectiveness. Kelly has already talked about the switch back to a more traditional spread look. That’s got to be music to Prosise’s ears.

At 6-foot-1, 220-pounds, Prosise is a big, strong and physical receiver. He’s got track speed, making him a candidate to return kickoffs as well. After spending his redshirt freshman season as a safety, Prosise’s sophomore year — his first true season on offense — was a good place to start.

He’ll likely battle with Torii Hunter Jr. for reps at Z, a position that Kelly and the Irish offense just haven’t been able to sort out. There’s a place on the offense for an athlete like Prosise. He’ll need to use the spring to make sure it’s his.

James Onwualu: While he didn’t show up on the stat sheet (Onwualu made just two catches for 34 yards), Onwualu capably filled the role of Daniel Smith, serving as the team’s best blocking receiver. This spring is an opportunity to add another element to his game, expanding his duties to an all-purpose receiver.

Onwualu is a bigger and more physical receiver than most of the depth chart. He also lacks the top end speed of some teammates. He excelled as a running back and receiver in high school and could be a versatile weapon, though he’ll need to continue to evolve his game. But this spring will be about expanding his role in the offense and continuing to be one of the team’s best special teamers as well.

Corey Robinson: After becoming almost a cult-like hero for his UND.com practice video highlights, just about any freshman season that didn’t include double-digit touchdowns and a YouTube highlight reel would’ve been a disappointment. But after flashing moments as a deep threat, jump ball specialist and making a few clutch catches, this spring is key in Robinson’s development.

Keep your eye on the unofficial spring roster. Robinson could check in a few inches taller, growing just as his father did post entry in the Naval Academy. But just as important as any growth spurt is an evolution to Robinson’s game. There’s every chance for Robinson to become a dominant pass catcher. He’ll need to build on a very good base, a set of hands and catch radius that’s the best on the team.

Will Fuller: That Fuller’s freshman season included a per-catch average almost 10 yards better than anyone else on the team is telling. Now he’ll have to use spring practice as a springboard to becoming an all-around receiver and a potential impact player. Still skinny, Fuller’s year in the weight room will come in handy as his reps increase.

Fuller is among the fastest players on the roster. Seeing TJ Jones run a (unofficial) 4.40 forty gives you an idea that Fuller can straight up fly. Daniels departure might really open a door for Fuller who will likely transition to an outside receiver position. Getting Fuller on the same page as Everett Golson could lead to some explosive plays downfield.

Torii Hunter Jr: It’s finally time to see what Hunter can do. After missing last year after a freak broken femur suffered at the US Army All-American Bowl, Hunter will try and immediately make an impact at a crowded position. With speed and athleticism and a smoothness that turned him into the MVP of The Opening, Hunter could be the Irish’s solution at slot receiver.

Kelly talked about Hunter’s impressive bowl season with the Irish. This spring he’ll need to establish himself in a depth chart that still is looking for a premium playmaker. After dominating “Trick Shot Monday,” this spring Hunter will give Hunter a chance to make a name for himself on the field as well.

Justin Brent: Consider Brent the X Factor of spring workouts. Some think he’s got the size, speed and talent to come in immediately and contribute. Some think he’ll redshirt, spreading the depth chart out by another year. But Brent enrolled early with hopes of battling for playing time immediately, and we’ll get a progress report starting next week.

There’s so much to like about Brent as a prospect. He’s probably the most physically dominant receiver on the roster already and he should be spending the next couple months wondering about a prom date.

If he can grasp a college offense quickly and get into the rotation this spring, Brent could be ready to make moves early next season.

Ben Koyack: Entering his senior season, Koyack still has the chance to be the next great Notre Dame tight end. The Oil City, PA native certainly had the recruiting pedigree that led you to believe he could be an elite player. Now, with Troy Niklas heading to the NFL and Alex Welch gone, Koyack is the lone survivor at the position, and posed to have a monster year.

Koyack needs to be a do-everything tight end. He’s got the bulk and size to play attached. He’s shown himself to be a productive receiver as well. We’ll ultimately see how Kelly views the Irish personnel at tight end this spring by seeing how many two-tight end sets the Irish utilize. Either way, expect Koyack to be the constant at a position with a lot of uncertainty.

Mike Heuerman: One of the biggest indicators to Heuerman’s spring will be the new roster listing for him. Undersized enrolling early last year, Heuerman needs to have the bulk and size that’ll allow him to attach to the line. We have seen so little of the young tight end, but his recruitment showed an impressive athlete with a mean streak. That’s a guy that can find the field.

With only three tight ends on campus this semester, Heuerman will get plenty of opportunities to build chemistry with the No. 1 offense. It’ll be up to him to parlay that into an opportunity next fall.

Durham Smythe: Another redshirt who drew praise from Kelly during bowl prep. Smythe was tasked by the coaching staff to add weigh and turn himself into a tight end who can play attached or in the slot. Again, we’ll see if he’s physically grown into that role yet.

Anyone with a true feel for how Smythe will do has an insiders perspective. But most of the word on the Texas native has been positive. With a more than great opportunity in front of him, Smythe needs to embrace the challenge of contributing right away and take control of his fate this spring.

Last look back: Wide receivers and tight ends

TJ Jones, Julian Wilson

For the first time in forever, the Irish entered the season without an All-American candidate to catch the football. Gone were Tyler Eifert, Michael Floyd, Golden Tate and Jeff Samardzija, one of the best runs of receivers in school history.

But even lacking a leading man, this season proved to be a formidable ensemble. Even as the Irish broke in a bushel of young receivers and unproven tight ends, the passing game stayed on track, with TJ Jones stepping forward with a big year while Troy Niklas and Ben Koyack providing a more than adequate 1-2 punch at tight end.

Let’s take one last look at the receivers and tight ends.


Beyond Jones, it’s amazing that Irish fans weren’t more concerned about the receiving depth chart. Senior Daniel Smith was a receiver heralded for his blocking skills. Luke Massa was a converted quarterback still hobbled after a major knee injury. While DaVaris Daniels was poised for a breakout season, the depth chart behind him was all unproven players, including a slew of freshmen.

At tight end, it wasn’t much better. Niklas was expected to take a big step forward, but Koyack was coming off a brutal sophomore season and Alex Welch was still recovering from an ACL injury. Freshmen Mike Heuerman and Durham Smythe weren’t expected to play.


GP-GS No. Yards Avg. TD Long
TJ Jones 13-7 70 1108 15.8 9 80
DaVaris Daniels 13-9 49 745 15.2 7 82
Troy Niklas 13-13 32 498 15.6 5 66
Chris Brown 13-4 15 209 13.9 1 40
Ben Koyack 13-5 10 171 17.1 3 38
Corey Robinson 13-3 9 157 17.4 1 35
CJ Prosise 13-2 7 72 10.3 0 16
William Fuller 13-3 6 160 26.7 1 47
James Onwualu 12-4 2 34 17.0 0 23
Daniel Smith 6-2 1 9 9.0 0 9



Bronze: TJ Jones vs. Temple

It was clear that Jones planned on turning 2013 into a season to remember. He got off to a quick start, breaking short passes for big gains and quickly established himself as the team’s No. 1 receiving option.

While it was DaVaris Daniels who caught two touchdowns over the top of the Temple defense, Jones made six catches for 138 yards, including a 51-yarder that he turned from nothing into a big gain.

Silver: TJ Jones vs. Arizona State

I toyed with giving this the gold, just because it was such a critical victory for the Irish. Jones did a little bit of everything for the Irish in this win. He caught eight balls for 135 yards, while also chipping in a touchdown.

He got over the top of the Sun Devils defense while also contributing two clutch first down catches late in the game. He also made a big play in the punt return game, taking one back 27 yards.

Clutch performance in a win that was one of the team’s most impressive.

Gold: DaVaris Daniels vs. Purdue

This is the kind of game Daniels is capable of playing. Utilizing his top-shelf speed, Daniels got over the top of the Purdue defense for a huge 82-yard touchdown catch, fighting his way to the end zone. Daniels also caught a beauty in the corner of the end zone, making a strong play for the football when that didn’t always happen this season (see Navy).

But on this September night in West Lafayette, Daniels played the type of football Irish fans would love to see from him next season, catching eight passes for 167 yards and two touchdowns.





Will Fuller. This could’ve just as easily gone to Corey Robinson, but Fuller’s emergence as the over-the-top threat, in addition to some skills that show he can be more than just that, give him the narrow nod.

Fuller only made six catches this year, but looking at that stat line, the 26.7 yard average certainly sticks out. It’ll be interesting to see where Fuller lines up now that TJ Jones is gone and DaVaris Daniels is out for the spring semester.



DaVaris Daniels. His numbers took a step forward, but he left a lot of good football on the field. For a junior, there were just too many times were Daniels was in the wrong spot or making the wrong read, and too often 50-50 balls went up without Daniels coming down with them. Elite receivers make those plays. Daniels didn’t all the time this season.

Add to that the semester suspension for the spring because of academic issues. So while it’s hard to be disappointed with seven touchdowns and 745 yards, it wasn’t the true breakout season that it could have been.



With Jones and Niklas gone, it’ll be interesting to see how Brian Kelly reformulates his offense. If the Irish had two top-shelf tight ends, like they could have with Niklas and Koyack, the strength of this team was likely playing double tight end sets, something the Irish did quite well in 2012.

Now, that strength shifts to the perimeter, where a young depth chart could begin to showcase itself. This spring will give us our first look at Torii Hunter Jr. and Justin Brent, two young players that could make an early impact.

Without Daniels, who takes advantage of the additional reps? Is it Corey Robinson, who could have a field day with Golson’s touch and ability to throw jump balls? Do Chris Brown and CJ Prosise come into their own as upperclassmen?

Expect to see more out of the slot receiver this season, with some interesting candidates for the position already at wide receiver, but also with Amir Carlisle.

So while the talent on the edge continues to improve, the question marks certainly remain.