Tag: Conor Hanratty

Jarrett Grace

Tracking fifth-year spots and the bumpy road to 85 scholarships


With Notre Dame on break, the campus is quiet one week before spring practice gets started. But the work inside the Gug is still likely underway, with recruiting efforts for the 2016 cycle pushing forward and discussions about the 2015 roster taking center stage.

While Matt Hegarty’s transfer announcement was the first big move, there are other very difficult conversations likely happening in the near future. With the 24-man recruiting class set to hit campus this June—along with graduate transfer Avery Sebastian—we will get a closer look at how Brian Kelly plans on dealing with the very first roster crunch of his tenure in South Bend.

As we look at the fifth-year senior candidates, it’ll be very interesting how the Irish coaching staff—not to mention the players who will all likely have immediate transfer opportunities after earning their degrees in May—let this play out.

There’s a chance Notre Dame could have players practicing this spring that aren’t a part of the roster come summer and fall. And that’s before taking into consideration the very likely return of KeiVarae Russell and the intention of bringing back Ishaq Williams as well.

Here are the fifth-year candidates currently on the roster:

Josh Atkinson
Jalen Brown
Amir Carlisle
Ben Councell
Matthias Farley
Everett Golson
Jarrett Grace
Conor Hanratty (Kelly already announced)
Matt Hegarty (Hegarty announced intent to transfer)
Chase Hounshell
Nick Martin
Anthony Rabasa
Joe Schmidt
Ishaq Williams


Let’s make some assumptions:

We have seen the last of Josh Atkinson and Jalen Brown. The veteran cornerback duo didn’t even travel to most away games last season and will be given every opportunity to catch on at a different program, but their time at Notre Dame is finished.

Staying on the defensive side of the ball, you can make the same assumption for Chase Hounshell. Multiple shoulder injuries took Hounshell’s career off course, and he’ll likely have to go to a smaller school to find a home.

Anthony Rabasa played a small role on last year’s defense, serving as a pass rusher in a defense in desperate need. If I were managing the roster, I’m not sure there’s room for him as a player, though what he does off the field and in the locker room (things we don’t know) could be the bigger determining factor.

On the flip side of these decisions, starters Nick Martin and Joe Schmidt are locks to return. The same for Matthias Farley and Everett Golson, with Golson holding the eject button if he feels the quarterback job won’t be his. (I don’t see this happening.)

Jarrett Grace needs to be healthy. We’ve heard Kelly nearly will him back to health with his frequent updates, but after a catastrophic injury that stayed far more under the radar than it should have, Grace seems to be back to playing shape this spring.

If he can play, he’ll be back. If not, it’ll make for a very difficult loss to the team, even if his shoes have been filled capably by Joe Schmidt on the field.

Because Amir Carlisle started the season opener in 2013 at tailback and had a successful first season as a slot receiver, he’s a good bet to return in my mind. Again, more opinion more than confirmed truth, but Carlisle is a high-character kid who can play a position of need on the roster, making him valuable.

Ben Councell might be a different story. Recovering from an ACL injury suffered in 2013 wasn’t easy . He’s also a tough fit in Brian VanGorder’s defense. We heard early last season that Councell would be a versatile piece of the Irish defense. That didn’t happen. So if he doesn’t feel like he’ll have a large role in the defense—or doesn’t feel like he can compete because of the injuries that have piled up—Councell might be on the bubble.

As Pete Sampson reported a few weeks ago, Williams needs to reapply to the university. From there, it’ll be very interesting how it all shakes out, as numbers seem to be tight. But Williams is a veteran body up front, something we saw a need for last season.

Fun With Numbers

Let’s look at how the Irish will get to 85 scholarships by the fall:


24 incoming recruits
22 second-year players
22 third-year juniors
11 seniors
graduate transfer (Avery Sebastian)
re-enrollment (KeiVarae Russell)
12 remaining fifth-year candidates
92 scholarship players

We’ve already basically subtracted four or five members from the fifth-year group if we’re to believe our assumptions. So that makes the seven subtractions look much more manageable than two or three scholarships.

And this is when we get used to the law of averages. Last year, Nile Sykes never made it to the season. From the 2013 recruiting class, we never saw Eddie Vanderdoes in South Bend and Rashad Kinlaw was dismissed as well.

Attrition hit the 2012 recruiting class even harder. Gone are Justin Ferguson, Gunner Kiel, Will Mahone, Davonte Neal and Tee Shepard.

So before we sound the alarm, there’s likely a very strong grasp on what is going on inside this program when the staff decided to expand their signing class to 24, and very good reason why Kelly sounded bullish on accepting a few graduate transfers as well.

Notre Dame doesn’t officially recognize redshirts. One of the benefits of forcing students to earn a degree in four years before being accepted into the graduate program is that it allows both the coaching staff and student-athlete to have full flexibility.

So while it certainly makes for some uncertainty as we try our best to track the roster, after five years of program building, we’re finally experiencing the first champagne roster problem of the past decade.

Report: Hanratty undergoing concussion testing

Property of 247Sports.com

Senior Conor Hanratty has a final year of eligibility remaining. But before he explores whether to continue his football career, he’ll undergo medical testing after suffering three concussions in the last calendar year.

Per a BlueandGold.com report from Lou Somogyi ($), Hanratty will be undergoing tests at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center to determine the severity of these brain injuries with Dr. Joseph Maroon, who also works with the Pittsburgh Steelers and is one of the leading voices on concussions. According to Somogyi, Hanratty suffered a concussion in last December’s Pinstripe Bowl, one during August training camp and another in the practices leading up to the bowl game.

If healthy, the return of Hanratty in 2015 is still a question mark. With a recruiting class that could still expand for a few more select players, bringing Hanratty back as a key reserve for a fifth year is likely a luxury. Younger players like Colin McGovern, John Montelus and Quenton Nelson are options to move up the depth chart at guard if the Irish legacy isn’t part of next season’s plans.

But Hanratty could likely catch on for a fifth year — likely teaming up with either Chuck Martin at Miami or Bob Diaco for his home state UConn Huskies if he thought the path to the playing field was open. But he’ll have to determine if continuing playing is worth the risk.

After not seeing the field as a freshman, Hanratty played six games in 2012 as a reserve. In 2013, he moved into the starting lineup in four of the final six games of the season.

Hanratty started the opening three games of 2014 before a shift moved Nick Martin and Steve Elmer to guard. Hanratty saw action in eight more games, not dressing for the Music City Bowl or seeing the field against Syracuse.

Irish A-to-Z: Conor Hanratty

Property of 247Sports.com

When Notre Dame offered legacy lineman Conor Hanratty, many raised an eyebrow. With sons of former stars like Tregg Duerson and Jake Golic doing little with the full ride many perceived as a nod to their famous predecessors, Hanratty had the profile of a player whose best attribute was his father, former Irish quarterback Terry Hanratty.

But after working his way up the depth chart, the Connecticut native showed that he earned his way onto the Irish roster. And in 2013, Hanratty played a valuable role as a reserve on an Irish offensive line battered with injuries.

Entering 2014 as a key backup at guard, Hanratty looks like another valuable contributor on Harry Hiestand’s offensive line. That’s all you can ask for from an offensive line competing for a job with this loaded depth chart.


6’4.5″ 309 lbs.
Senior, No. 65



Hanratty was a three-star prospect who didn’t make it on the national radar playing in New Canaan, Connecticut. But he had some interesting offers, including opportunities to play at Boston College, Cal, Clemson, Florida State, Iowa and Stanford before closing his recruitment early by picking Notre Dame in April.

Those are the type of offers that go to a big-time prospect, not a guy with just a big-time father. On Signing Day in 2011, Kelly talked about some of the traits that he and his staff saw when offering Hanratty, things we’ve seen in his limited action so far.

“What we liked about Conor was somebody that we believed over a period of time as we developed him he was going to be a really good football player for us. We liked his tenacity. He really got after people,” Kelly said.  “He’s going to have to get stronger, going to have continue to work hard. Those are the things that we think we can teach him. He’s got some of those unique, innate abilities.”



Freshman Season (2011): Did not see action.

Sophomore Season (2012): Played in six games as a reserve offensive lineman, seeing action on special teams as well as in a backup role. Played against Navy, Michigan, Boston College, Wake Forest, USC and Alabama.

Junior Season (2013): Played in the final six games, making four starters at right guard in place of an injured Christian Lombard at right guard twice and then in place of Chris Watt against Navy and in the Pinstripe Bowl against Rutgers.



For as much as we rave about the ability of rising sophomore Steve Elmer, Hanratty took multiple starts from him once Lombard went down. And with both Lombard and Chris Watt injured late in the year, Hanratty and Elmer saw the field together, a telling sign that Hanratty had worked his way into the long-term plans of Harry Hiestand and Kelly.

Hanratty doesn’t appear to be the type of player that was readymade for college football. But plenty of programs develop their front line, and it was interesting that Wisconsin was one of his offers, as they routinely take players and spend a few years getting them ready with training table and weight room time.

Far from the most physically impressive lineman on the roster, Hanratty still has traits that work at either guard position, where he’ll likely spend this season as the primary backup. And if Mike Golic was able to spend time in an NFL training camp, Hanratty is certainly capable of that, giving him the leg up in a crowded depth chart to start once Lombard departs after this season.



In all likelihood, Hanratty is the next man in at guard for the Irish in 2014. But he’s also probably the sixth lineman, with Steve Elmer the first to kick outside to tackle if someone goes down there as well. So that puts Hanratty in a valuable position, the No. 1 replacement for Lombard and Elmer, while also getting onto the field if anything happens to Ronnie Stanley or Mike McGlinchey.

With depth like this, it’s worth seeing how Kelly and Hiestand split snaps. Do they make sure 2013 contributors like Hanratty and Matt Hegarty stay in rhythm, taking regular snaps and subbing in? That’s harder to do at center than guard, especially with Nick Martin locked in and healthy.

Hanratty is likely what life will look like going forward at Notre Dame. With the Irish recruiting up front among the best in the nation, it should routinely take two or three years to make it to the starting lineup. That makes for a longer development cycle and wait for players, but will serve the team better in the long run.



The Irish A-to-Z
Josh Atkinson
Nicky Baratti
Alex Bars
Hunter Bivin
Grant Blankenship
Jonathan Bonner
Justin Brent
Kyle Brindza
Chris Brown
Jalen Brown
Greg Bryant
Devin Butler
Jimmy Byrne
Daniel Cage
Amir Carlisle
Austin Collinsworth
Ben Councell
Scott Daly
Sheldon Day
Michael Deeb
Steve Elmer
Matthias Farley
Tarean Folston
Everett Golson
Jarrett Grace

Spring Solutions: Offensive line

Louis Nix, Steve Elmer

It may not feel like it, but spring isn’t too far away. For Notre Dame and Brian Kelly’s football team, spring practice is starting earlier than every, kicking off in early March.

The rationale for moving up the calendar isn’t 100 percent clear, but what is certain are the steps the Irish need to take to get back to the elite. As college football enters the playoff era, the 15 practices this spring will give the Irish their marching orders heading into summer workouts.

Needing to replace key starters on both sides of the ball, let’s take a look at the pre-spring practice depth chart, starting along the offensive line.


Nick Martin, Sr. — C*
Matt Hegarty, Sr. — C*
Christian Lombard, GS — G/T
Conor Hanratty, Sr. — G*
Mark Harrell, Jr. — G*
Hunter Bivin, Soph. — G/C*
Colin McGovern, Soph. — G*
John Montelus, Soph. — G*
Ronnie Stalney, Jr. — T*
Steve Elmer, Soph. — G/T
Mike McGlinchey, Soph. — T*

*Fifth-year of eligibility available. 

Harry Hiestand won’t know what to do with himself this spring. After having miniature groups the past few springs with the depth chart in poor shape, competition will be at a premium this spring, with the two-deep stocked with people competing for playing time.

The departure of Zack Martin and Chris Watt leave two gigantic holes in the offensive line, but there are plenty of candidates to fill the jobs. Let’s walk through the spring objectives for each lineman on the depth chart.


Nick Martin: First and foremost is returning healthy after a knee injury ended Martin’s season early. Kelly gave good news on that front, calling Martin ahead of schedule during a press conference at the end of January. That doesn’t necessarily mean Martin will be taking live reps, and if he does that goes to show you how quickly he’s healed.

Then again, if he doesn’t, it’s a sign that the staff is comfortable letting him get through spring healthy. After a more than serviceable debut season in the starting lineup, the hope would be that Martin takes that leap forward in his second season at center.

Matt Hegarty: After battling some really serious health issues, Hegarty had to be one of the true surprises of the season, stepping into the lineup after Martin got hurt and holding his own against some really difficult competition. Hegarty played well against BYU, Stanford and Rutgers, facing off with some solid competition and showing himself fully recovered from a scary stroke he suffered.

Hegarty was a highly touted recruit. He’s got the size and athleticism the Irish staff targeted from the start. If he’s able to push Martin at center, there’s a chance he could play his way into a swing role at both guard and center, making himself a key reserve heading into the season.

Christian Lombard: Irish fans have all but forgotten about Lombard, the 2012 starting right tackle who shifted inside to play guard alongside Ronnie Stanley. But Lombard went down with a back injury early in the season, forcing Steve Elmer into the starting lineup. If healthy, Lombard is a key returning starter that could serve as an anchor on the interior.

The lone fifth-year player on the depth chart, Lombard has played a lot of football and has always been highly thought of by this staff. (Take a trip in the “Way Back Machine” and remember the Irish staff letting Matt Romine play out his eligibility elsewhere to allow Lombard to start at tackle.) Lombard’s a big body at guard who has the ability to play tackle as well.

Conor Hanratty: Hanratty was impressive last season, cutting into Elmer’s reps at guard before being forced into a more regular role when Chris Watt got injured. Now a senior, Hanratty’s urgency for a starting job will only be elevated. How things shake out on the interior of the offensive line should be interesting.

Expect Hanratty to stake a claim to a guard job, though what the staff does with Elmer remains to be seen. Depth like this is hardly a problem, but it certainly makes for a nice challenge. With redshirts coming off some other guys, the guard competition will be fierce.

Mark Harrell: After redshirting during 2012, Harrell didn’t see the field in 2013 either. From what we’ve heard from the coaching staff, Harrell’s got positional flexibility on the interior of the line, though he’ll be competing at a packed position with talented guys both younger and older than him. Getting on the map will be the first order of spring for Harrell.

Hunter Bivin: This will be our first look at Bivin, who was an emergency option down the stretch last season. A really athletic prospect who came into Notre Dame as a highly touted recruit, Bivin could play anywhere along the line, though might be Notre Dame’s next center after Martin and Hegarty move on.

Colin McGovern: McGovern wasn’t completely healthy last season, so spring will be a good opportunity to get his first true reps as someone competing for playing time. The Illinois native should earn some fans on the coaching staff with his mauler style, but he’ll have to work his way through a stocked depth chart as well.

John Montelus: Another redshirt getting his first look at true competition. Kelly spoke about Montelus’ recovery from shoulder surgery, proclaiming him healthy for spring. He’s a physically different player than most of the guys on the depth chart, with his 340 pounds a rather eye-popping number. That kind of heft might be useful in the trenches.

Ronnie Stanley: This is an important spring for Stanley, who had a sneaky, below-the-radar type season for the Irish in 2013. It’ll be clear to most that Stanley is a very good football player. Is he the Irish starting right tackle again? Does he shift to the left side? Does it really matter?

Stanley is a building block for this offensive line and will be counted on to be a key player next season. He should spend this spring asserting his dominance and preparing to be a front-line championship-level player for the Irish.

Steve Elmer: We’re past the point of wondering “if” Elmer plays next season. But “where” is a really interesting question. It’ll be important to give the sophomore a real opportunity to make a home at a position. You could make a decent argument that it could be at three or four different spots.

Elmer’s got the size and ability to be a left tackle. But if Mike McGlinchey is in the coaching staff’s plans at that position, then Elmer’s too good to keep off the field. In that case, he could slide inside and take over Chris Watt’s job. But that’s keeping some very good football players off the field as well. If Stanley flips to the left side, Elmer could play right tackle. And he spent a ton of last season playing right guard.

These type of dilemmas aren’t problems for coaching staffs. And as Alabama showed with Barrett Jones, it’s possible to slide a talented lineman all around. Elmer has that type of ability, so it’ll be a fun spring to watch what happens.

Mike McGlinchey: That Elmer isn’t a lock to step in at left tackle says a lot about McGlinchey. Expect to see and hear a lot about the monument-sized tackle, who will likely be given the first shot at the starting job. The season off likely helped McGlinchey grow into his 6-foot-8 frame, and he’ll have packed on plenty of weigh from his listed 290 pounds.

Brian Kelly has raved about McGlinchey’s athleticism, calling him athletic enough to play tight end during his signing day press conference and then talking about his arm strength and basketball ability as well. It’ll be fun to watch McGlinchey take his first meaningful snaps this spring.

Putting a redshirt freshman at left tackle is a big decision. But McGlinchey seems to fit the part well.


Offensive line taking shape

Offensive Line

Christian Lombard is a returning starter at right tackle, playing all thirteen games in a 12-1 season. But that hasn’t stopped him from embracing the reality that comes with improving personnel and elevated expectations. While the status quo wasn’t challenged during spring drills, one week into training camp, it’s obvious that Lombard understands that every job is up for grabs.

“The best five guys need to be out there,” Lombard told Pete Sampson at Irish Illustrated. “If I am, I am. If I’m not, I’m not.”

Right now, those five guys are starting to take shape. The left side of the offensive line is a given. Zack Martin may be one of college football’s most under-appreciated players, a four-year starter at left tackle and the three-time offensive lineman of the year for Notre Dame. Chris Watt has the physicality and ability to be a starting guard on Sundays.

From there, it gets interesting. While Matt Hegarty is battling with Nick Martin at center, Brian Kelly’s confidence in the younger Martin is really telling. Yesterday during his session with the local media, Kelly blanked when asked about two new starters, a brain freeze that came courtesy of his comfort level with Martin at center.

“I even look at Nick Martin, he doesn’t seem like a first-year starter,” Kelly said. “Just the way he handles himself, it just seems like he’s been in there for a couple years. It’s very impressive.”

From there, it comes down to two jobs, the right guard and right tackle position. And with Conor Hanratty out for much of the last week at guard, the coaching staff has gotten an extended look at Ronnie Stanley playing right tackle, necessitating Lombard to kick inside to guard. It’s the type of training camp tweak that sometimes turns into career changers — consider what happened to Dan Wenger that allowed Braxston Cave to step in at center a few years ago.

Of course, the fact that the Irish have the option to move a thirteen game starter from tackle to guard and fill that position with a guy that’s already seen the field (or in Hanratty’s case, play as a third year guy in the system) says something about the depth being built. It also speaks to the versatility of Lombard and the athleticism of Stanley, who looks like a guy that might have some positional flexibility as well.

This is the final season where the Irish should have to mix and match along the line. While there will be pains associated to losing Martin and Watt as the anchors of the left side, two blue-chip recruiting classes should infuse new blood that hold multiple promising players. Until then, we’ll have to watch as the final pieces of the Weis era — Martin and Watt — anchor a unit that’s poised for a big season.