Tag: Dan Fox

Prince Shembo

Shembo, Jackson and Jones selected on Day Three of NFL Draft


Prince Shembo, Bennett Jackson and TJ Jones were all selected on the third day of the NFL Draft, making that eight former Notre Dame players selected in the 2014 draft. That’s the highest total in 20 years, when Lou Holtz’s squad produced 10 selections. Notre Dame’s eight selections were second to only LSU and matched Alabama’s.

Shembo was the first player to come off the board on the draft’s third day, selected in the fourth round with the 139th pick by the Atlanta Falcons. While Shembo spent much of the offseason circuit showcasing his versatility, the Falcons hope he can go back to what put him on the map originally at Notre Dame, rushing the passer.

In what might be a bit of a surprise, Jackson came off the board next. Selected in the sixth round with the 187th overall pick, the New York Giants took a shot on the Irish captain, who had a subpar senior season but still impressed the Giants with both his tangible and intangible traits.

“We think he’s on the come, he has some intangibles that we like, height, weight speed, we think we can hit on a guy like this who comes in,” Giants GM Jerry Reese said. “He’s the guy who’s a leader, can play on all your special teams while he’s still developing into a corner.”

Jackson is heading home, growing up in nearby Hazlet, New Jersey. Interestingly, former Notre Dame personnel man Tim McDonnell is now with the Giants as a scout, so he likely had some input in Jackson’s scouting report.

Last off the board for the Irish was wide receiver and team captain TJ Jones. Selected by the Lions just two picks after Jackson, Jones will join Golden Tate in Detroit’s receiving corps, with an eye on the third receiver job behind All-Pro Calvin Johnson.

“Very impressed by him,” Lions GM Martin Mayhew said about Jones. “Clutch guy. Play maker for (Notre Dame). Converted a lot of third downs and he was a guy they went to in the red area. I like him as a slot guy, running inside getting separation. I thought he had really good hands and really crisp routes.”

Jones probably stayed on the draft board longer than most expected, but is heading to a place that could be very good for him. He’ll have a familiar friend at the position in Tate and will have the opportunity to compete, all you can ask for as a sixth round pick.

The rest of Notre Dame’s draft-eligible prospects signed free agent contracts. George Atkinson signed with the Oakland Raiders, the team where his father played and currently works on the radio broadcast team. Carlo Calabrese signed with the Cleveland Browns. Dan Fox heads to New York, joining Jackson with the Giants. Tommy Rees signed with the Washington Redskins and Kona Schwenke signed with the Kansas City Chiefs.

Final thoughts before kickoff

Louis Nix III

Ann Arbor is abuzz with tailgates set and thousands migrating towards the Big House. In a game and grudge match that feels mighty personal, let’s run through some final thoughts before kickoff.

At this point, we’ve beaten some of the match-ups to death, so here are ten key players that need to step up for Notre Dame to win.

Tommy Rees: Nobody has more on their shoulders than Rees tonight. He’ll be challenged mentally and physically, with Michigan likely needed to make Rees uncomfortable to force him into some bad decisions.

If Michigan can do that, they’ll likely win the game. If they can’t, expect the Irish to be victorious.

TJ Jones: Big time players play big in big games. (Say that five times fast.) Brian Kelly has talked so much about the improvement of Jones in the last year, we’ll see if that’s Kelly trying to ease the pain of losing first round talents in consecutive years or if Jones has finally come into his own.

Last week, it was DaVaris Daniels as the designated deep threat while Jones made plays from the slot in the short passing game. Some of those stretch the field plays could come TJ’s way this week, especially if Daniels’ groin pull nags.

Nick Martin/Ronnie Stanley: Both players are making their first road start in a hostile environment. If they’re capable of playing up to the moment, the Irish offensive line will have the chance to overpower Michigan’s front. Brian Cook of MGoBlog hinted this morning on Twitter that defensive tackle Quinton Washington might be limited tonight. That’s got to be considered good news for the Irish.

One of the Running Backs: I was leaning towards putting Amir Carlisle’s name here, but it’s too tough to tell which back will run with his opportunities tonight. I expect someone to, and it could be any of the guys.

The Irish need to run the ball effectively tonight.

Dan Fox: While he filled the stat sheet, I didn’t think Dan Fox played his best game last week. With Devin Gardner elusive both inside the pocket and out, Fox is going to need to play disciplined, but aggressive football, making the tackles in space when he has to do it.

Stephon Tuitt: I personally think the one-on-one battle between Tuitt and Taylor Lewan is probably overhyped, with Tuitt likely playing all over the defensive line, not just exclusively lineup up across from Michigan’s All-American. But Tuitt needs to be dominant at the line of scrimmage, both in the run game and pass.

Getting sacks is great, and Tuitt should probably get at least one every Saturday he plays, but keep Gardner confined to the pocket while dominating up front will be key.

Ishaq Williams: Playing a mix of positions last week, Williams had his shot at getting a sack, but ran through it out of control. That can’t happen tonight, where the quarterback will be more elusive. I’m predicting Williams (finally) picks up his first sack tonight.

Elijah Shumate: He didn’t play his best football last week. But Shumate needs to rebound, providing nickel coverage in the slot against guys like Drew Dileo and Jeremy Gallon, two diminutive but elusive wide receivers.

Kyle Brindza: Brian Kelly might just put Brindza in charge of all three kick units. And if that’s the case, the junior needs to be up for the challenge. A Michigan native, Brindza needs to do a better job of directional punting and if he’s called upon, make the field goal attempts in a game where three points usually determines the winner.

Louis Nix: Big Lou was frustrated last week by double-teams. Expect more of the same tonight against an inexperienced interior offensive line. But Nix needs to impact the game both on and off the stat sheet, detonating Michigan’s line of scrimmage and being a destructive force as the tip of the spear for the Irish defense.

Offseason cheat sheet: Linebackers


While the linebacking corps might be best known for the player that departed, the Irish should be very strong both inside and out even without All-American Manti Te’o roaming the field. Head coach Brian Kelly has talked quite a bit about the type of teammate and leader the Irish need to replace in Te’o, but there’s confidence in the team meeting room that the defense should be just fine without the defensive player of the year.

While Danny Spond’s retirement during fall camp took away another starter, there’s depth at all four positions under Bob Diaco’s watch. With talented newcomers blending with a strong group of seniors, this is likely the best linebacking corps the Irish have fielded since the Holtz era.


It’s crazy to think that this position could’ve actually gotten stronger while losing Te’o, but there’s a very good argument to be made. With fifth-year seniors Dan Fox and Carlo Calabrese starting, it’s hard to think of a more experienced duo in the middle of the field. While Calabrese has some deficiencies in pass coverage, he’s had a strong summer and fall camp, holding off Jarrett Grace, who looked like a guy that would plug into Te’o’s role while Fox and Calabrese would continue their platoon.

Senior Kendall Moore provides an exciting backup, a guy that’s immensely productive in the run game but still needs to advance his skills against the pass. Former walk-on Joe Schmidt is also in the mix, with freshman Michael Deeb looking like a guy physically ready to contribute.

The strength of this group might be on the edges. Prince Shembo could be one of college football’s most underrated players, and he could very well end up with double-digit sacks from his Cat linebacker position. Shembo put on nearly ten pounds since last season and somehow looked slimmer during fall camp. Spond’s departure also opened the door for Jaylon Smith, and it’ll be interesting to see how quickly Smith becomes a difference maker for this unit. With the cover skills of a cornerback at 230 pounds, Smith should also be very productive against the outside run game.

With talented depth across the board, we’ll likely see a lot of Ishaq Williams, a guy some people still project to be a front-line All-American caliber player. Kelly talked about Williams quite a bit this camp, saying the junior is ready to take the next step. The same could be said for Ben Councell, who adds some bulk at the Dog linebacker position, capable of playing physical in the box.


Here’s a look at the positional breakdown of both inside and outside linebackers.

Dan Fox, Sr. #48
Carlo Calabrese, Sr. #44
Jarrett Grace, Jr. #59
Kendall Moore, Sr. #8
Joe Schmidt, Jr. #38
Michael Deeb, Fr. #42
Prince Shembo, Sr. #55
Ishaq Williams, Jr. #11
Jaylon Smith, Fr. #9
Ben Councell, Jr. #30
Romeo Okwara, Soph. #45
Danny Spond, Sr. #13
Anthony Rabasa, Jr. #56
Doug Randolph, Fr. #19
Connor Little, Jr. #93
Austin Larkin, Fr. #52


Expect to see a lot of the top three inside linebackers, with Fox and Calabrese sharing snaps with Grace. Fox might be more of the every down player, but all three are close to interchangeable parts, while Moore could help out situationally.

On the outside, it’ll be interesting to see how Bob Diaco finds snaps for Shembo and Williams, as both are in the team’s top eleven defenders and should find a way to be on the field. For a freshman, Smith has a bunch of qualities that make it very difficult to take him off the field, but that’s an awful lot of pressure on a first year player.

A player to watch: Romeo Okwara. Will the coaching staff try and protect a year of eligibility for the just tuned 18-year-old, or is he too good to keep off the field, even at the deepest position on the roster.