Tag: Dayne Crist


Weis to Kansas, Crist to follow?


It’s not like you couldn’t see it coming. Yesterday’s bombshell news that Charlie Weis was leaving his post as the offensive coordinator at Florida to take over the Kansas football program led to me openly hypothesizing about quarterback Dayne Crist joining him in Lawrence. (I even tweeted it 18 hours ago.) Well, just minutes ago Pete Thamel of the New York Times reported that Crist will leave tomorrow for an official visit to Kansas, where he’ll consider reuniting with the coach that brought him to Notre Dame.

The ties to the Kansas quarterbacking job and Notre Dame are all too unique. For Crist, rejoining Weis could lead to the renaissance he’ll need to resurrect any professional aspirations he had. It’ll also put him back in a pro-style offense that’ll fit the fifth-year senior’s skillset, playing in a system he spent two years learning. But before he makes the decision to head to the Jayhawks, he’d be well served to discuss the move with one of his current coaches, offensive line coach Ed Warinner. It was Warinner that led the charge recruiting current Jayhawk starting quarterback Jordan Webb. (Warinner will also likely know just about all of the veteran offensive personnel for the Jayhawks, giving Crist an idea of just what he’ll be walking into.) If Crist is going to play at Kansas, he’ll need to beat out a quarterback that started all 12 games this season and seven during his redshirt freshman season. At six-foot, 195-pound, Webb doesn’t profile as a prototype Charlie Weis quarterback, but he’s got a lot of experience and is one of the team’s leaders.

Even before a coaching change was in the works, competition at the quarterback position was a given. Then offensive coordinator Chuck Long told the Kansas City Star that spring practice would be dedicated to building depth, with redshirt freshman Michael Cummings, entering the fray and two high school commitments, Seth Russell and Bilal Marshall committed to the Jayhawks. Russell is a lanky 6-foot-4 Texas product with an offer to Wake Forest his only other BCS option, while Marshall looks a little bit more impressive, with the dual-threat Florida prospect sporting a handful of impressive offers including Georgia Tech, Virginia, Northwestern, Baylor and Boston College among others. Weis honored the commitments of Ty Willingham’s recruits when he took over at Notre Dame, so you’d expect him to do the same at Kansas, especially this late in the recruiting game.

Of course, bringing in Crist could also lead Weis down the wrong path. One of the pitfalls Weis ran into at Notre Dame was failing to develop depth in his first two seasons in South Bend, and bringing in a one-year quarterback like Crist could be more of the same for the former Irish coach. Turner Gill only won one game in the Big 12 in his two seasons at Kansas, so the “win now” attitude that was needed in South Bend doesn’t likely apply to the demands of Jayhawk football fans. (They leave that to Bill Self’s basketball team.) Does a stop-gap quarterback send the right message to a team that likely needs to be rebuilt from the ground up? His second time around, will Charlie learn from mistakes he made at Notre Dame and develop the youth on a roster that’ll likely need to be fully restocked?

On a day when the Irish lost their offensive coordinator to UMass, the college football world was abuzz with Weis’ sudden departure from Florida, where he was the highest paid offensive coordinator in the country and had his son working in the football program. Say what you want about Weis — and yesterday, far too many media members resurrected tired pot shots and half-decade old grudges — but the man can develop quarterbacks and run an offensive (even if Florida fans didn’t see it in his only season in Gainesville).

If Crist does decide to head to Kansas to finish his career, it’ll be a walk down memory lane for Irish fans. It’ll be bizarre seeing Weis and Crist wearing Jayhawk blue and red, but it’ll also be fun to see Dayne finally get the chance to play in the offense he was recruited to run.

Crist makes it official: Transfer in motion

Dayne Crist

It started with a tweet last week (of course it did, this is 2011 after all), quickly deleted after it spread like wildfire through cyberspace:

walkerRcarey Walker Carey
I have a sneaking feeling that I will be a Wisconsin Badgers fan next year.
8 hours ago Favorite Retweet Reply
Retweeted by @SeanCwynar98

After weeks of speculating where Dayne Crist would play football next season, the dot-connecting from a random tweet sent by a Notre Dame student that’s friends with the quarterback, echoed by defensive lineman Sean Cwynar, and viewed hundreds of times by Irish fans all across the country officially kicked into motion with news exclusively broken by the Chicago Tribune, though already known by just about every member of Notre Dame nation.

Dayne Crist is officially leaving Notre Dame after he graduates at mid-semester and head coach Brian Kelly has granted permission for Crist to begin talking to schools looking for a quarterback.

“Dayne and I had a good conversation Friday and I have granted him permission to speak to other schools,” Kelly told the Tribune. “Dayne has been a valuable member of our team the last two years and if he feels he needs to look for a better situation then I think we owe that to him.”

That Crist is leaving is far from a surprise. After being named the team’s starting quarterback after a heated battle with Tommy Rees that lasted all through preseason camp, Crist lasted 30 minutes in the role, pulled after an ineffective and mistake riddled half of football against South Florida put the Irish in a 16-0 hole they couldn’t get out of. From there, the senior quarterback — widely (and appropriately) heralded as a team leader — was relegated to the bench, a very visible reminder that the 2011 Irish, a team with high expectations, had disarray at the one position that determines a team’s ceiling.

Crist did get one shot at redemption this season after being relegated to the bullpen. With Rees dazed after a knee injury against USC, Dayne enter the game in relief during the second half. The senior quarterback looked crisp and comfortable with the offense, driving the Irish down the field and completing a clutch fourth down throw to Tyler Eifert to keep a potential game-tying drive alive. But what happened to the hard-luck Crist would crystallize his career under the Golden Dome. Under center and ready to pull the Irish even, Crist fumbled the snap, failing to fall on the ball as it squirted behind him. The fumble was picked up by a Trojan and run in for a back-breaking touchdown. It was the last meaningful snap Crist took under center for the Irish.

The Tribune report targets Wisconsin, Utah and San Diego State as potential landing spots for Crist, who is eligible to play immediately under NCAA transfer rules. Of course, the Badgers just took advantage of the same rule with Russell Wilson, and the fifth-year quarterback led the Badgers back to the Rose Bowl and had one of the most efficient seasons in college football history.

Wherever Crist will go, he’ll need to find his way onto the field and play in a system that accentuates a skillset that had the Southern California natives one of the most highly-rated players in the country coming out of high school. Whether head coach Bret Bielema is willing to take another one-year player, and one far less of a sure bet than Wilson, one of the ACC’s best players, isn’t certain. It’s likely Crist will go some place where the spotlight isn’t quite as bright, a situation that might benefit both team and player equally.

After four winding season and two major knee injuries, Dayne Crist’s career at Notre Dame is over. While it didn’t end the way he had wanted it, he’ll have one last season to reclaim a career path that seemed certain when he first stepped foot on campus.

The good, the bad, and the ugly: Notre Dame vs. Navy

Jonas Gray Navy

If there’s criticism, it should be of the constructive manner this afternoon, a day after the Irish let go of some frustration on Navy. The 56-14 thumping was the biggest beating of Navy since Tony Rice, Mark Green and Ricky Watters beat up the Midshipmen in 1987.

The victory was a complete mauling — with the Irish dominating nearly every facet of the game. The Irish averaged a gaudy 7.4 yards a play, put up 442 yards on offense and managed to keep the time of possession battle close against a Navy team that just about always dominates the football.

Defensively, the effort was even more impressive. After struggling against the Navy option last year, the Irish kept the ground game in check, keeping Navy consistently “off schedule,” holding the Midshipmen to an average third down of seven yards. Of the 50 runs Navy called, the Irish held 24 of them to two yards or less. That’s the perfect recipe to defeat a great offensive unit and a team that’s had Notre Dame’s number the past few years.

Let’s put the Midshipmen in the rearview mirror as we look at the good, bad and ugly of the Irish’s 56-14 beating of Navy.


Let’s hit this in bullet points:

* Michael Floyd: It was only the second time the senior had the opportunity to play against the Midshipmen, and he took advantage of his physical mismatch. Dominating on short throws and long, Floyd was the Irish’s best offensive player.

* Cierre Wood and Jonas Gray: Neither broke the long one, but they moved the chains and dominated the football game. After forgetting about the two-headed ground machine, the Irish ran far more often than they threw it.

* Tommy Rees, the game manager: Tommy will find his way into the “Bad” column too, but going 16 of 22 with a nice long touchdown pass is worthy of a mention. Rees was accurate with the ball on a day where the weather wasn’t perfect, and the Irish look ready to switch to their November mode of football, just like they did last season.

* The offensive line: That’s a sackless month for Ed Warinner‘s group, who dominated the line of scrimmage on Saturday. The Irish only had two third downs in the first half, converting them both.

* Austin Collinsworth: He was a special teams dynamo — making multiple tackles in kick coverage, a nice return on a short kickoff, and reminded us that he’s the kind of athlete that’ll get a shot to play once Harrison Smith departs.

* Manti Te’o: He was dominant in the middle of the field. He could’ve been in the books for 25 tackles if the game stayed competitive as he embodied the Irish’s nasty disposition. (His run-blitz for a loss was a thing of beauty.)

* Stephon Tuitt: The Irish aren’t sure what they’re going to do with Tuitt yet, reaping the benefits of his physicality both on the inside and outside of the defensive line. What they are sure of is that Tuitt has already turned into a physical mismatch — and it was obvious yesterday afternoon.

* Louis Nix: The big man also chipped in a big day, with six tackles and a half sack. Between Sean Cwynar and Nix, the Irish are in great shape down the stretch at nose guard.

* Robert Blanton & Jamoris Slaughter: Both members of the secondary played great games at the line of scrimmage, combining for 12 tackles and handling the outside of the option well.

* Dayne Crist: Kelly wanted to get him on the field a series earlier, but the senior quarterback looked good bouncing back from a terribly disappointing Saturday a week ago. (It would’ve been great to get him that touchdown on the QB draw.)

* George Atkinson: Even if he didn’t break another big one, the Irish averaged 30.3 yards a return. Very quietly, the Irish are creeping their way to the top of the statistical heap on kickoff returns.


It’s tough to be too critical about anything after that victory, but let’s officially pick some nits.

* Lateral Damage: Once again, the Irish lost the ball on an incomplete backwards pass. Blaming Rees is the easy thing to do, but Theo Riddick needs to take a better angle on the pattern and Tommy needs to be more accurate.

I think just about every Irish fan would be happy losing the backwards pass deep in the Irish’s own territory.

* Late interceptions: Rees threw a late interception with the Irish already up 49-7 on a 3rd and 6. Rees never should’ve tried to force the ball into the window he had, and his chinstrap slamming reaction showed how upset he was about it.

* Lack of breakaway speed: Theo Riddick tied a career long with his 37 yard catch down the sideline. That’s the good part. But he got caught from behind by a Navy safety. Not sure if Riddick is completely healthy, but either way, file that play under the “maybe he’s not a game-breaker” category.

* Lack of touchbacks: Kyle Brindza spent the first half of the year rocketing kicks into the end zone. Not sure if there’s something wrong or it was strategic, but Brindza didn’t have his regular fastball.

* Fill in the blank: I’m sure I’m forgetting something bad here, but I expect you all to mention it in the comments.


What could possibly be ugly after this victory? The Irish should be singing Kumbaya together after dealing with an ugly loss in a rivalry game, some hurt feelings, and a team meeting to clear the air.

At 5-3, the Irish need to prepare to hit the road for a night game in Winston-Salem. Get out of there alive, and we can start talking about running the table until Stanford.