Tag: Ed Warinner


Weekend notes: Shembo, Hiestand, Heuerman, and more


Brian Kelly met with the media after practice today, with the biggest piece of news being an injury to linebacker Prince Shembo. Spotted wearing a boot on his left foot, Kelly didn’t seem overly concerned about a slight case of turf toe, which will keep him off the field for a handful of days.

An injury to any of the outside linebackers on the roster would put the Irish in a precarious situation, but right now it lets Ishaq Williams get a taste of the starting job. Williams has been an interesting test case this spring, with both Kelly and defensive coordinator Bob Diaco mentioning the changes in Williams’ energy level during practice.

“He’s getting there. He’s getting there. The light is starting to go on,” Kelly said. “There were a couple of instances today where there were some one-on-one match-ups between Troy Niklas and Ishaq Williams… Pretty exciting stuff. He’s getting there. He’s got to do it consistently, but we know what he’s capable of when it all starts to come together.”

You can see the exchange in UND.com’s video (embedded right below here), and the smile that comes to Kelly’s face shows you just how impressive both Williams and Niklas are as athletes.

There’s no reason to think Shembo’s injury is a serious one, but it sounds like Justin Utupo would be a guy that could potentially flex out to the ‘cat’ linebacker position, as it wouldn’t make any sense to shift Niklas back to defense after spending the spring and offseason transitioning.

Here’s the Kelly’s entire exchange with the press from earlier.


The early returns on new offensive line coach Harry Hiestand are excellent. While the early returns on every new assistant coach are usually good, Hiestand has immediately shown himself an impressive recruiter and someone the players have latched onto from the get-go.

As someone that was extremely excited about the Ed Warinner hire when it happened, I expected the loss of Warinner to Ohio State be something that hurt the Irish offense. But from snooping around people close to the program, and just listening to some of the players and their reactions to Hiestand, it’s clear that the fit is a good one and the transition has been ultimately positive — almost addition by subtraction according to some.

Pete Sampson at IrishIllustrated.com has a great article showing just how much allegiance Hiestand’s players show him, with former All-Pro center Olin Kreutz visiting South Bend this week to spend time on the field with the Irish offensive line.

Chris Watt walked into the film room and stumbled across a legend.

Deep inside the Gug watching videos of Notre Dame’s offensive line was former Chicago Bear Olin Kreutz, a six-time Pro Bowl center. For a Chicagoland senior who grew up driving to Bears training camps, the introduction offered a shot of star power and insight into Harry Hiestand.

“I was definitely surprised,” Watt said. “How much he really wants to come back and help (Hiestand) and cares about him says a lot.”

Kreutz attended Notre Dame’s practice Wednesday morning and stayed after to work with the line on technique. In the afternoon the 13-year NFL star planned to watch tape with Hiestand, breaking down a group Notre Dame’s new line coach has drilled for just five practices.

Kreutz and Hiestand spent five years together with the Bears, which included a Super Bowl run in 2006. He attended a spring practice at Tennessee last year when Hiestand worked in Knoxville, driving more than eight hours to get there.

We’ll ultimately know how well Hiestand does with this line after watching it work next fall, but if Kreutz is any indication, Hiestand’s players stay tremendously loyal to him.


After a week where the Irish recruiting class made staggering in-roads, Notre Dame is entertaining one of the nation’s top tight ends, with Naples, Florida’s Mike Heuerman on campus this weekend. The line for Heuerman’s signature is pretty distinguished, and if the Irish are going to win out, they’ll need to beat schools like LSU, Miami, Florida State, and Ohio State, where Heuerman’s brother Jeff plays tight end for for Urban Meyer.

That said, the Irish sales pitch is pretty impressive, with Jake Brown getting a great quote from Heuerman on new offensive coordinator Chuck Martin‘s sales pitch.

“I was on the phone with Coach Martin,” Heuerman told Brown. “He was telling me, ‘When you’re here to watch practice this is our every day practice. When you see what we’re doing with the tight ends you’ll definitely be stunned and almost blown away and you’ve got to understand we’re not doing this Thursday and Friday because Mike Heuerman will be in town. This is what we do every single practice and this is what we plan on doing in the games.’”

If you listened to Kelly’s presser from above, it’s pretty clear the Irish are going to be playing two tight ends a lot of the time, with Eifert likely detached from the line and a physical mismatch with a cornerback. While Eifert is listed as a TE, he might as well be a jumbo-WR, and the battle to play the traditional tight end position is a three-man race between Ben Koyack, Troy Niklas, and Alex Welch, with Jake Golic also in the mix.

The switch of Niklas to the offensive side of the ball was a head-scratcher for some — especially when they turned down an elite TE recruit in Taylor McNamara. But when you consider they needed someone physically ready to be an in-line blocker first and a pass catcher second, it explains why you go to someone as physically impressive as Niklas, who is essentially an slightly undersized, more athletic left tackle.


Finally, Notre Dame welcomed five walk-ons to the football program this spring. I’ve already spotted a few of these guys in the UND videos, but here are the official roster listings:

  • No. 67: Kevin Carr, DE | 6-7, 325 | junior (Nashville, Tenn./Montgomery Bell Academy)
  • No. 17: Charlie Fiessinger, QB | 6-1, 185 | sophomore (Mason, Ohio/Moeller)
  • No. 63: Grant Patton, DE | 6-6, 256 | senior (Louisville, Ky./Saint Xavier)
  • No. 94: Dominic Romeo, DE | 6-6, 245 | junior (Turlock, Calif./Pitman)
  • No. 84: Andre Smith, WR | 6-2, 190 | sophomore (Davie, Fla./North Broward Prep)

One walk-on that’s also making some noise in camp is Minnesotan Connor Little, who is in the rotation at the ‘dog’ linebacker with Ben Councell and Danny Spond. Little, a six-foot-three, 225-pound freshman was a recruited walk-on from Hill-Murray High School in St. Paul, and had some opportunities to play Ivy League football before choosing Notre Dame.



The good, the bad, and the ugly: Notre Dame vs. Navy

Jonas Gray Navy

If there’s criticism, it should be of the constructive manner this afternoon, a day after the Irish let go of some frustration on Navy. The 56-14 thumping was the biggest beating of Navy since Tony Rice, Mark Green and Ricky Watters beat up the Midshipmen in 1987.

The victory was a complete mauling — with the Irish dominating nearly every facet of the game. The Irish averaged a gaudy 7.4 yards a play, put up 442 yards on offense and managed to keep the time of possession battle close against a Navy team that just about always dominates the football.

Defensively, the effort was even more impressive. After struggling against the Navy option last year, the Irish kept the ground game in check, keeping Navy consistently “off schedule,” holding the Midshipmen to an average third down of seven yards. Of the 50 runs Navy called, the Irish held 24 of them to two yards or less. That’s the perfect recipe to defeat a great offensive unit and a team that’s had Notre Dame’s number the past few years.

Let’s put the Midshipmen in the rearview mirror as we look at the good, bad and ugly of the Irish’s 56-14 beating of Navy.


Let’s hit this in bullet points:

* Michael Floyd: It was only the second time the senior had the opportunity to play against the Midshipmen, and he took advantage of his physical mismatch. Dominating on short throws and long, Floyd was the Irish’s best offensive player.

* Cierre Wood and Jonas Gray: Neither broke the long one, but they moved the chains and dominated the football game. After forgetting about the two-headed ground machine, the Irish ran far more often than they threw it.

* Tommy Rees, the game manager: Tommy will find his way into the “Bad” column too, but going 16 of 22 with a nice long touchdown pass is worthy of a mention. Rees was accurate with the ball on a day where the weather wasn’t perfect, and the Irish look ready to switch to their November mode of football, just like they did last season.

* The offensive line: That’s a sackless month for Ed Warinner‘s group, who dominated the line of scrimmage on Saturday. The Irish only had two third downs in the first half, converting them both.

* Austin Collinsworth: He was a special teams dynamo — making multiple tackles in kick coverage, a nice return on a short kickoff, and reminded us that he’s the kind of athlete that’ll get a shot to play once Harrison Smith departs.

* Manti Te’o: He was dominant in the middle of the field. He could’ve been in the books for 25 tackles if the game stayed competitive as he embodied the Irish’s nasty disposition. (His run-blitz for a loss was a thing of beauty.)

* Stephon Tuitt: The Irish aren’t sure what they’re going to do with Tuitt yet, reaping the benefits of his physicality both on the inside and outside of the defensive line. What they are sure of is that Tuitt has already turned into a physical mismatch — and it was obvious yesterday afternoon.

* Louis Nix: The big man also chipped in a big day, with six tackles and a half sack. Between Sean Cwynar and Nix, the Irish are in great shape down the stretch at nose guard.

* Robert Blanton & Jamoris Slaughter: Both members of the secondary played great games at the line of scrimmage, combining for 12 tackles and handling the outside of the option well.

* Dayne Crist: Kelly wanted to get him on the field a series earlier, but the senior quarterback looked good bouncing back from a terribly disappointing Saturday a week ago. (It would’ve been great to get him that touchdown on the QB draw.)

* George Atkinson: Even if he didn’t break another big one, the Irish averaged 30.3 yards a return. Very quietly, the Irish are creeping their way to the top of the statistical heap on kickoff returns.


It’s tough to be too critical about anything after that victory, but let’s officially pick some nits.

* Lateral Damage: Once again, the Irish lost the ball on an incomplete backwards pass. Blaming Rees is the easy thing to do, but Theo Riddick needs to take a better angle on the pattern and Tommy needs to be more accurate.

I think just about every Irish fan would be happy losing the backwards pass deep in the Irish’s own territory.

* Late interceptions: Rees threw a late interception with the Irish already up 49-7 on a 3rd and 6. Rees never should’ve tried to force the ball into the window he had, and his chinstrap slamming reaction showed how upset he was about it.

* Lack of breakaway speed: Theo Riddick tied a career long with his 37 yard catch down the sideline. That’s the good part. But he got caught from behind by a Navy safety. Not sure if Riddick is completely healthy, but either way, file that play under the “maybe he’s not a game-breaker” category.

* Lack of touchbacks: Kyle Brindza spent the first half of the year rocketing kicks into the end zone. Not sure if there’s something wrong or it was strategic, but Brindza didn’t have his regular fastball.

* Fill in the blank: I’m sure I’m forgetting something bad here, but I expect you all to mention it in the comments.


What could possibly be ugly after this victory? The Irish should be singing Kumbaya together after dealing with an ugly loss in a rivalry game, some hurt feelings, and a team meeting to clear the air.

At 5-3, the Irish need to prepare to hit the road for a night game in Winston-Salem. Get out of there alive, and we can start talking about running the table until Stanford.

The good, the bad, the ugly: Notre Dame vs. Pitt

Jonas Gray Pitt

A second viewing of Notre Dame’s 15-12 victory doesn’t add new perspective to Saturday’s win. The maddening inconsistencies that have plagued this football team still exist, rearing their ugly heads when you’d least expect it. Two turnovers, a missed field goal, and too many penalties all combine to give you a squad that has understandably driven Irish fans nuts.

At one moment, Notre Dame looks like a BCS-level team, capable of moving the ball by air or ground in big chunks, shut down quarterbacks and running backs with an impressive group of defensive players. At others, the offense is a turnover machine, the special teams are horrendous, and the secondary needs a trip back to Football 101, where covering receivers and looking for the football aren’t mutually exclusive exercises.

But that’s life at 2-2. And after two head-scratching losses, the Irish’s two least impressive offensive outputs are wins that Notre Dame absolutely had to have. Like it or not, that’s progress. And while it certainly hasn’t been pretty, Brian Kelly‘s job isn’t to win games with style points, it’s to win games. With a proven track record of getting his teams to improve throughout the year  — seen last year with the Irish’s November to remember — there’s every reason to believe that this team will work through the troubles that ail them.

A winning streak is a winning streak, and the Irish’s win in Pittsburgh was a must have. Let’s take a look at the good, bad and ugly of Notre Dame’s 15-12 victory.


After struggling in short yardage situations, the Irish offensive line came up huge. In a game where the Irish needed to dominate the line of scrimmage, Ed Warinner‘s guys up front did some serious work in the trenches, winning every short-yardage battle they were presented with.

The Irish were 8 for 8 in third or fourth and short (three yards or less):

1st Quarter

3rd and 2 — Cierre Wood runs for 2 yards.
3rd and 2 — Cierre Wood runs for 2 yards.
3rd and 3 — Rees hits Michael Floyd for 5 yards (Defensive holding call accepted).

2nd Quarter

3rd and 3 — Rees hits Tyler Eifert for 6 yards.

3rd Quarter

3rd and 3 — Jonas Gray runs for 4 yards.
4th and 1 — Tommy Rees runs for 1 yard.

4th Quarter

3rd and 2 — Cierre Wood runs for 3 yards
4th and 1 — Tommy Rees sneaks for 1 yard.

While Irish fans watching on TV weren’t as confident, Kelly paid his offensive lineman the ultimate compliment when he trusted them to end the game on Tommy Rees‘ sneak. Interior linemen Braxston CaveChris Watt and Trevor Robinson came through, even if they only made it by half a football.

A few other things to file under the good category:

*Jonas Gray‘s burst around the corner, and confidence in the open field. I can’t say enough about the 79-yard touchdown, and after a tough first carry where Gray made a poor read on a well set-up run play, Gray turned the game on its head with his game-breaking touchdown.

* Punter Ben Turk also had his best ballgame of the season, putting three punts inside the Pitt 20 and launching another ball 47 yards. It’s hard to get too excited about a 37.2 yard punting average, but Turk did his job, and for the first time didn’t mis-kick any of his punts.

* While he didn’t break it for a touchdown, George Atkinson had another nice day returning kickoffs. His 36-yard return helped the Irish start with good field position in the second quarter.

* Repeating yesterday’s thoughts, Darius Fleming played a dominant football game at the line of scrimmage.


If you’re wondering what life looks like after Michael Floyd, it might not be all that pretty. With Pitt putting two men on Floyd, the Irish couldn’t take advantage of a defense that came into the game ranked 119th against the pass. Credit the defensive game plan put together by Todd Graham and his coaching staff, but if the Irish are going to keep winning football games, they’re going to need to get more out of Theo Riddick and TJ Jones.

Riddick had a quiet six catches yesterday and Jones was held to three catches for 31 yards. Whether it means giving Robby Toma more snaps or forcing the ball into Riddick earlier to get him involved, the Irish need to get production from somebody other than Floyd and tight end Tyler Eifert. It was a disheartening step back for the Irish offense, especially against a group that had shown serious coverage lapses when they were tested.

More importantly, the Irish have to decide what kind of offense they want to be. With Rees at the helm, they aren’t able to run zone read plays where the quarterback is a running option. But that doesn’t mean they need to be a read and react offense that assesses what the defense gives and counter-punches. The Irish have already shown that while that works in spurts, it also puts way too much pressure on a young quarterback, and taking what the defense gives you only works when you don’t have a penchant for throwing interceptions.

The Irish have one of their most potent rushing attacks in nearly a decade. They also have a wide receiving corps that goes as many as five or six deep. That sets up perfectly for a push-the-pace offense that dictates terms to the defense, not the other way around. The Irish aren’t going to be an explosive offense if they play horizontal football, dinking and dunking their way down the field. And while Rees can’t beat you with a QB keeper, he throws a great ball up the seam, showing more than enough arm strength and timing to eat up chunks of field vertically.


This football team still makes too many head-scratching mistakes. This week’s culprits were on special teams, where the Irish nearly cost themselves a football game with a roughing the punter penalty on sophomore Austin Collinsworth, giving Pitt a much needed first down on the Panthers’ only touchdown drive of the afternoon.

Kicking from their own end zone, Collinsworth tried to make a big play with a punt block up the middle, but dove straight into the legs of punter Matt Yoklic, who sold the refs on a 15-yard personal foul call. Whether you disagree with the refs call or not (Collinsworth barely touched the punter), the Irish haven’t shown themselves capable of making game-changing plays that require sound execution, and Mike Elston‘s unit would’ve been better served setting up for an easy return, especially considering Pitt’s mediocre kickers. Collinsworth is one of the Irish’s best special teamers, but coming right up the middle he made the cardinal sin of diving straight at the kicker and instead of the Irish starting with the ball at midfield, Tino Sunseri drove his team for their only score.

While the punt return game continues to be mediocre with John Goodman handling returns, the Irish field goal unit missed its second kick in three attempts, this one pushed wide right by David Ruffer after long-snapper Jordan Cowart‘s snap came back as a knuckleball. Cowart’s only job is to snap, and he’s been erratic this season on both punts and kicks, a real area of concern for the Irish, who need more certainty from all their special teams units.


Possibly the best part of this column is that the Irish come up with a win in the ugly category. The Irish were able to win a football game without playing anywhere near their best. It’s certainly not the kind of thing people were expecting four games into the season, but after starting 0-2, the Irish simply need to keep picking up Ws, regardless of how maddening it can be.