Tag: Everett Golson

Michigan v Notre Dame

Irish open spring: Five quick updates from BK


With Irish eyes already smiling thanks to St. Patrick’s Day, Notre Dame fans got a free double-down with Brian Kelly’s opening press conference before spring practice starts tomorrow.

Kelly, donning a green sweater over a green golf shirt, spoke with the assembled local media over the lunch hour, giving us 50 minutes of long-awaited updates as the spring roster was revealed.

Here are five quick things I found very interesting:


Ben Councell is retiring. 

I hinted at this last week, but outside linebacker Ben Councell is not going to pursue a fifth-year. As we looked at the roster-crunch to get to 85 scholarships, Councell was one name that I had heard wasn’t a lock to come back.

Kelly confirmed that on Tuesday.

“He chose not to continue to play. We respected that decision,” Kelly said. “He was offered an opportunity to continue to play. He’s not going to play football anymore. He’s just going to get his degree and move on to the next chapter for him. Ben’s a great young man and we wish him the best.”

Kelly also confirmed Jalen Brown was not returning, while also clarifying that the little used cornerback wasn’t invited back.


It’s Alex Bars and Quenton Nelson battling for the open left guard job. 

We’ll get a look at the two redshirt freshmen for the first time. And if Kelly’s comments are any indications, the young players are all that’s been advertised.

After explaining that Nick Martin was returning to center and Matt Hegarty didn’t want to compete for the left guard job, Kelly pointed to the two first-year participants as the top candidates for the vacancy along the offensive line.

“Quenton Nelson, Alex Bars,” Kelly said. “We’ll let those guys battle at the left guard position. That’s going to be fun to watch those two guys battling out at the left guard position.”

While some other players are going to cross-train and add some depth at tackle and center, don’t expect it to be Bars or Nelson. After seeing how difficult that was for Steve Elmer, consider it a lesson learned for Kelly and Harry Hiestand.


C.J. Prosise is cross-training as a running back. 

Even though Amir Carlisle was Notre Dame’s starting running back to open the 2013 season, it’s fellow slot receiver C.J. Prosise that’s taking reps at running back.

Kelly confirmed the position tweak for Prosise with Tarean Folston and Greg Bryant the only scholarship backs on the roster until Josh Adams and Dexter Williams arrive this summer.

“He’s been in the running back meetings. He’ll get a lot of work at running back,” Kelly confirmed of Prosise. “Amir will not cross train. He’ll stay at the slot receiver. C.J. will get quite a bit of work at running back.”

After leading the team in yards per catch and showing a ton of explosiveness at 220 pounds, this looks like a smart way to get Prosise more touches while also protecting the depth chart. Expect new offensive coordinator Mike Sanford to enjoy seeing what Prosise can do in a hybrid role.

We’ve talked constantly about finding a Percy Harvin (the game-breaking elite talent not the guy who can’t stick on an NFL roster) for this offense. Prosise might be that guy.


Fifth-year candidate Chase Hounshell is attempting to reboot his career as a blocking tight end. 

Long assumed gone after struggling with injuries and the defensive line depth chart, get ready to see a new number—and a new attitude—associated with veteran Chase Hounshell.

He’ll be wearing No. 18 and at 255 pounds will compete to be a blocking tight end. And he’s getting that opportunity because he did everything he could to convince Kelly to give him the chance.

“Chase knocked down my door, wouldn’t leave me alone, just kept coming back and saying, ‘Coach, I want to be part of this team. I have something to offer,'” Kelly explained.

“We don’t really have a role for you on the defensive line, but we could use a big, physical, blocking tight end. Would you be interested in that role? He said, ‘Coach, I’ll do whatever you ask me to do.'”

With just Durham Smythe’s one catch returning to the position and rising sophomore Tyler Luatua the only big-body that looks the part of a run blocker, experimenting with Hounshell at the position is a win-win for both parties.

If a roster crunch comes, Hounshell will have spent the spring staying in shape and could supply some good tape to a program looking for a veteran player, who could also have sixth-year options considering his multiple shoulder injuries.

Jake Golic finished his career at Cincinnati. Perhaps Hounshell will have the same type of opportunity if it doesn’t work out in South Bend. But credit the veteran for wanting to finish things the right way.


Any assumptions about the quarterback position should be thrown out. 

After an offseason where many of us (I’m partially guilty, too) have advanced the storyline at quarterback when we’ve heard nothing out of the parties actually involved, Kelly did a nice job resetting the expectation at the position.

While talking about both Everett Golson and Malik Zaire, he laid out his expectations for spring practice, with each player having clear objectives.

But for all the talk about the offense being turned over to Zaire or a ride-share program already being implemented, these comments from Kelly about Golson and his future as the team’s starting quarterback struck me.

“First of all, if I’m Everett, I don’t think that he has to accept that he has to share time with anybody,” Kelly said. “I don’t think that notion has ever been floated to him. I’ve never floated that.

“The only thing that I’ve ever said to Everett is that you have to come in here and compete for the starting quarterback position. I never once said to him, You have to come here and share playing time with anybody. You need to come in here and be committed to competing for the quarterback position. That’s all I’ve ever asked him to do.”

Notre Dame Mailbag: It’s all about the Quarterbacks

Everett Golson

One question, asked a half-dozen different ways. And it’s all about the quarterbacks.


cajunirish: EG is currently taking a needed scholarship and IMHO has been outplayed by MZ. What are the chances EG transfers and frees up that scholarship?

bxirish162: Considering ND’s wealth @ QB -Would ND be better off starting
Zaire and getting reps to other QBs behind him? Golson’s time seems to have passed via multiple causes but passed nevertheless.

irishkevy: All this talk about Malik Zaire as the full time starter at QB makes my head hurt. Say it ain’t so, Brian Kelly & staff have officially lost their mind(s). Please tell me I’m wrong here?!?! Gearing up for the most potential on an ND roster and they’re going to start a QB who’s furthest completion will be a 3 yard pass.

notrebob: Keith,I’m a firm believer in golson,and golson alone,he has to be the starter at least lead dog,without golson ND doesn’t beat LSU I am of the group who say if you have 2QBS you have none what sir say you.

@NastraDumas: Who do you think ND’s offense will be better off with under center this season?Golson or Zaire? Why?


While the search for new coaches took up most of February, it’s hard to think of anything over these next two months that’ll take up as much time as the quarterback race. In Golson and Zaire, Brian Kelly has two quarterbacks who have won football games. (In Zaire’s case, football game.)

In 2012, Golson was a risk-averse game manager who protected the football, extended plays with his legs and made a few key big plays as he led the Irish to an undefeated regular season. In 2014, he was one of college football’s best playmakers, but his propensity for turnovers made it impossible for the Irish offense to outscore opponents down the stretch and hold on to win football games.

The love and respect for Zaire comes from a few places. One, he’s the type of football player you can’t help but love to watch. Fearless as a runner, Zaire had no problem carrying the load against LSU. As a leader, his enthusiasm—whether down by multiple touchdowns to USC or flooded with emotions after a bowl victory—is exactly what you want from a quarterback.

It’s just too hard to know exactly what Notre Dame has in Zaire. But we do know that he’s capable of moving the Irish offense on the ground and showed a decent enough touch in his limited opportunities as a thrower.

From a leadership point of view, Golson never turned into the face of the offense. His quiet nature and reserved attitude hardly shout out leader or captain. That’s a real issue moving forward, especially with Zaire being such a natural. Then again, Dayne Crist had all the leadership skills you could ever want, but didn’t have the football acumen to match.

In a perfect world, both quarterbacks stay on campus. Both quarterbacks embrace competition, pushing each other to be better in 2015. And both quarterbacks get a chance to play, compete and help Notre Dame win. It worked for Chris Leak and Tim Tebow. It can work for Golson and Zaire.

Kelly’s reluctance to hand the offense over to Zaire last year says everything you need to know in his belief that he was prepared to lead the team to victory. That just as much on Zaire as it is on Kelly, with the Irish head coach doing what he believed best for the team.

But at the same time, allowing one player to make mistake after mistake without letting his backup get a shot makes little sense. Remember the punishment for Max Redfield? It lasted even after Austin Collinsworth and Drue Tranquill struggled to cover the ground they needed out of a free safety. That’s two sets of rules for two different positions. That’s not good for a football team.

Ultimately, there are just too many variables in this battle to feel like you can have a firm grasp on the situation. They’ll start over fresh with a new quarterback coach and offensive coordinator in Mike Sanford. They’ll be learning some new concepts and evaluated differently. They’ll also have a chance to put last season in the rearview mirror, a helpful exercise for both Golson and Zaire.

I still think Golson is the quarterback who can do the most for Brian Kelly’s offense. But I’m not sure Notre Dame is committed to running that offense anymore.

Not after seeing the Irish roll through LSU in the bowl game. Not after realizing the offensive line can dictate terms and a gameplan that isn’t 100 percent quarterback reliant can take college football’s ultimate prize.

So, in short, I have no idea what will happen.

But man, this sure will be interesting to watch.

Tracking fifth-year spots and the bumpy road to 85 scholarships

Jarrett Grace

With Notre Dame on break, the campus is quiet one week before spring practice gets started. But the work inside the Gug is still likely underway, with recruiting efforts for the 2016 cycle pushing forward and discussions about the 2015 roster taking center stage.

While Matt Hegarty’s transfer announcement was the first big move, there are other very difficult conversations likely happening in the near future. With the 24-man recruiting class set to hit campus this June—along with graduate transfer Avery Sebastian—we will get a closer look at how Brian Kelly plans on dealing with the very first roster crunch of his tenure in South Bend.

As we look at the fifth-year senior candidates, it’ll be very interesting how the Irish coaching staff—not to mention the players who will all likely have immediate transfer opportunities after earning their degrees in May—let this play out.

There’s a chance Notre Dame could have players practicing this spring that aren’t a part of the roster come summer and fall. And that’s before taking into consideration the very likely return of KeiVarae Russell and the intention of bringing back Ishaq Williams as well.

Here are the fifth-year candidates currently on the roster:

Josh Atkinson
Jalen Brown
Amir Carlisle
Ben Councell
Matthias Farley
Everett Golson
Jarrett Grace
Conor Hanratty (Kelly already announced)
Matt Hegarty (Hegarty announced intent to transfer)
Chase Hounshell
Nick Martin
Anthony Rabasa
Joe Schmidt
Ishaq Williams


Let’s make some assumptions:

We have seen the last of Josh Atkinson and Jalen Brown. The veteran cornerback duo didn’t even travel to most away games last season and will be given every opportunity to catch on at a different program, but their time at Notre Dame is finished.

Staying on the defensive side of the ball, you can make the same assumption for Chase Hounshell. Multiple shoulder injuries took Hounshell’s career off course, and he’ll likely have to go to a smaller school to find a home.

Anthony Rabasa played a small role on last year’s defense, serving as a pass rusher in a defense in desperate need. If I were managing the roster, I’m not sure there’s room for him as a player, though what he does off the field and in the locker room (things we don’t know) could be the bigger determining factor.

On the flip side of these decisions, starters Nick Martin and Joe Schmidt are locks to return. The same for Matthias Farley and Everett Golson, with Golson holding the eject button if he feels the quarterback job won’t be his. (I don’t see this happening.)

Jarrett Grace needs to be healthy. We’ve heard Kelly nearly will him back to health with his frequent updates, but after a catastrophic injury that stayed far more under the radar than it should have, Grace seems to be back to playing shape this spring.

If he can play, he’ll be back. If not, it’ll make for a very difficult loss to the team, even if his shoes have been filled capably by Joe Schmidt on the field.

Because Amir Carlisle started the season opener in 2013 at tailback and had a successful first season as a slot receiver, he’s a good bet to return in my mind. Again, more opinion more than confirmed truth, but Carlisle is a high-character kid who can play a position of need on the roster, making him valuable.

Ben Councell might be a different story. Recovering from an ACL injury suffered in 2013 wasn’t easy . He’s also a tough fit in Brian VanGorder’s defense. We heard early last season that Councell would be a versatile piece of the Irish defense. That didn’t happen. So if he doesn’t feel like he’ll have a large role in the defense—or doesn’t feel like he can compete because of the injuries that have piled up—Councell might be on the bubble.

As Pete Sampson reported a few weeks ago, Williams needs to reapply to the university. From there, it’ll be very interesting how it all shakes out, as numbers seem to be tight. But Williams is a veteran body up front, something we saw a need for last season.

Fun With Numbers

Let’s look at how the Irish will get to 85 scholarships by the fall:


24 incoming recruits
22 second-year players
22 third-year juniors
11 seniors
graduate transfer (Avery Sebastian)
re-enrollment (KeiVarae Russell)
12 remaining fifth-year candidates
92 scholarship players

We’ve already basically subtracted four or five members from the fifth-year group if we’re to believe our assumptions. So that makes the seven subtractions look much more manageable than two or three scholarships.

And this is when we get used to the law of averages. Last year, Nile Sykes never made it to the season. From the 2013 recruiting class, we never saw Eddie Vanderdoes in South Bend and Rashad Kinlaw was dismissed as well.

Attrition hit the 2012 recruiting class even harder. Gone are Justin Ferguson, Gunner Kiel, Will Mahone, Davonte Neal and Tee Shepard.

So before we sound the alarm, there’s likely a very strong grasp on what is going on inside this program when the staff decided to expand their signing class to 24, and very good reason why Kelly sounded bullish on accepting a few graduate transfers as well.

Notre Dame doesn’t officially recognize redshirts. One of the benefits of forcing students to earn a degree in four years before being accepted into the graduate program is that it allows both the coaching staff and student-athlete to have full flexibility.

So while it certainly makes for some uncertainty as we try our best to track the roster, after five years of program building, we’re finally experiencing the first champagne roster problem of the past decade.

Spring solutions: Quarterbacks

Franklin American Mortgage Music City Bowl

One of the most impressive statistical seasons in school history was flushed down the toilet when Everett Golson could not stop turning the football over. With fumbles, poor decision-making and some plain bad luck plaguing Golson’s otherwise exceptional season, Brian Kelly chose Malik Zaire to be his starter for the Music City Bowl.

Zaire’s performance against LSU essentially rebooted a quarterback battle that at one point seemed near impossible for Golson to lose. But entering spring camp, it’s a two-man race to see who’ll get a chance to run a Notre Dame offense that should be the best of the last decade.

Heading into spring practice, let’s take a deep dive into the quarterback depth chart, headed by one of the best position battles in college football.




1. Everett Golson, Grad Student
or Malik Zaire, Jr.*
3. DeShone Kizer, Soph.*
4. Montgomery VanGorder, Soph.*

*Signifies fifth-year of eligibility available.

With new quarterbacks coach Mike Sanford getting his first look at the three quarterbacks on the roster, don’t expect this battle to start during practice one. But before Brandon Wimbush gets to campus, all three quarterbacks have to be sharp from the open of practice, as the head coach won’t ever be too far away from the action.



Everett Golson: While getting reacclimated to campus life and working his way through the media circus was Golson’s challenge last spring, the microscope will be just as fixated on the veteran quarterback during these 15 practices.

Last year, many wondered if Golson’s return would deliver the Irish offense its savior. Now, many are wondering if Golson even wants to fight for his job back or does he plan to transfer after he graduates in May to another program.

Golson knows Kelly’s offense better than any quarterback on the roster. He’s also the most talented passer. But making the extraordinary play doesn’t mean much if you can’t do the ordinary correctly, and a commitment to the little things this spring is crucial.

One last piece to keep your eye on: Golson’s leadership. Far from a natural born leader, Golson’s ownership of the offense could transfer to Zaire this spring if he’s not fully engaged.


Malik Zaire: For this spring to be a success, Zaire needs to prove to Kelly and the Irish coaching staff that he’s just as good of a practice player as he is a gamer. We’ve seen Zaire shine brightly on the big stage — playing well in his first two Blue-Gold games and making his minutes count against USC before breaking loose against LSU.

But to be the face of an offense like this you need to be more than just a game day standout, you need to be the best practice player on the roster as well. Zaire just didn’t do that the last two seasons — with Kelly speaking openly about that struggle multiple times.

Zaire is ready to lead this team — he’s got charisma and confidence that most quarterbacks would kill for. But working with a new offensive coordinator and an offensive staff that’ll demand the quarterback owns the entire playbook means Zaire can’t afford to be the guy who can turn it on when he wants to. Not if he’s going to win the starting job.


DeShone Kizer: He may be the forgotten man in this quarterback battle, but Kizer’s got an important spring in front of him as well. Most importantly, it’s getting a foot forward in the battle for the No. 3 job — before Wimbush gets to campus.

Kizer is an intriguing quarterback and going through the phase of his career where he’s forgotten (a redshirt year and a blue-chipper in the recruiting class will do that to you), with Wimbush the newest and shiniest at the position. But at 6’5″ and with good speed and a solid arm, there’s plenty to like about Kizer, and he’ll need to show that he’s making progress this spring.


Montgomery VanGorder: Earning a scholarship last season as he served as the emergency third-stringer, VanGorder isn’t likely to take many snaps this spring, with reps going to Golson and Zaire with Kizer getting a sprinkling as well.

But that’s life for a walk-on, and VanGorder will have his chance to earn his keep by learning Sanford’s way of running the offense. That could mean this spring is about learning new hand signals. Or new techniques. Whatever it is, a fourth-stringer’s job is about doing the little (sometimes off field) things right, and this spring will be a chance to do that.

Even with competition, Kelly expects Golson to return in 2015

North Carolina v Notre Dame

As Malik Zaire helped the Irish pull off a critical win in the Music City Bowl, all eyes turned to the quarterback who wasn’t playing. After starting the season’s first 12 games, Everett Golson played a complementary role in the Irish victory, completed some clutch passes down the stretch during Notre Dame’s 31-28 victory.

As we shift into the offseason with Notre Dame’s offensive identity still in flux, rumors of Golson’s transfer — especially with the ability to leave after earning his degree in May — have started to churn.

There’s the rumor that Golson reached out to LSU. The quarterback took to Twitter to refute that. (The sentiment was echoed by personal QB coach George Whitfield, who has stayed close with both Golson and his family throughout this season.)

While appearing on SportsCenter today in the run up to the College Football Playoff’s championship game, Brian Kelly talked about Golson’s status with the team, and the conversations he’s had with his quarterback. While it’s not a surprise to hear this from the head coach, Kelly expects Golson to be back in South Bend next season.

“I’ve talked to Everett,” Kelly said on SportsCenter. “Everett needs to come back and go through spring ball. He’s ready to compete. And he will compete in the spring. He’s going to graduate this spring, and that’s going to allow him to keep his options open.

“But I expect him to be back and competing for the starting position. Both of them will have an opportunity. I’d love to see both of them on the field for us. I think we can play them both. Everett’s got a chance to win that starting position. I know he expects to be the starter in the fall, and he’ll have the opportunity to do that.”

While the stock answer was there for the taking, Kelly’s candor about the elephant in the room — Golson’s ability to essentially be a free agent after earning his degree — was refreshing. Also refreshing was the fact that Kelly’s been in communication with his quarterback. With school on break until next week and the team away from campus, that the two would connect and air things could while the rumors were swirling is important.

Just as important is the idea that Kelly is open to finding a system where both quarterbacks contribute. While Zaire’s running ability and performance in the Music City Bowl make him the flavor of the month, Golson is far too good to throw away after some sloppy play. (Remember, Jimmy Clausen was a turnover machine as a second-year player before putting together an elite junior season.)

For the health of the program, keeping the depth chart stocked with both Golson and Zaire will be critical to Notre Dame’s success in 2015. If Golson leaves, the Irish are back in a precarious offensive situation — a quarterback with six quarters of experience backed up by two young players who have never taken a snap. If that’s Zaire, it’s going to limit the abuse he can take as a runner, thus limiting his effectiveness as well.


Per Irish 247, Kelly also made a stop on Colin Cowherd’s ESPN radio show. The Irish head coach covered a variety of topic, including the big victories Midwestern schools (Wisconsin, Ohio State and Notre Dame) had over SEC powers.

“Look, the SEC has earned the reputation that they had, and has,” Kelly said. “But certainly, Notre Dame beating LSU, Ohio State beating Alabama, Wisconsin beating Auburn, I think all of those things are good for college football, because they bring a balance to this playoff, that you can win across the board from the Midwest to the South.

“And we were talking before we went on the air, kids want to play. And if they can’t get that starting position at Alabama, then maybe I can get it at Wisconsin, maybe I can get it at Ohio State or Notre Dame, and I think we’re starting to see with the playoff, and the notoriety you can get by being at one of these other schools, gives you the opportunity to play anybody.”