Tag: Jerome Bettis

Tim Brown of the University of Notre Dame

Jerome Bettis, Tim Brown elected into Pro Football Hall of Fame


Former Notre Dame football standouts Jerome Bettis and Tim Brown were both elected in to the Pro Football Hall of Fame on Saturday night. Bettis played for the Irish from 1990-92 while Brown played in South Bend from 1984-87, winning the Heisman Trophy after his senior season.

The two were part of an eight-man group to be elected, joining former San Diego Chargers linebacker Junior Seau, Kansas City Chiefs guard Will Shields, and defensive end Charles Haley among the modern-era inductees.

Former Minnesota Vikings center Mick Tingelhoff was selected by the seniors committee and former NFL executives Bill Polian and Ron Wolf will be enshrined as well.

Both Bettis and Brown’s star turns began at the collegiate level. Before becoming some of the best players on Sundays, they did (most of ) their damage for head coach Lou Holtz.

Bettis was one of the best fullbacks in Notre Dame history. He scored 27 touchdowns during his three seasons in South Bend before becoming the 10th overall pick in the 1993 NFL Draft.

Brown is Notre Dame’s last Heisman Trophy winner, and his career in South Bend ended with Brown holding 19 different school records. He was a two-time All-American who had 1,937 all-purpose yards in 1986 before ranking sixth in the country during his Heisman-winning season with 167.9 yards per game.

Bettis was in his fifth year of eligibility for the Hall of Fame. Brown was in his sixth.

Wood and Gray are running to a historic season

Cierre Wood Pitt

Tango and Cash. Turner and Hooch. Murtaugh and Riggs. HollyWood and Meatball.

The last duo might not have the notoriety yet, but it hasn’t been for a lack of effort by Cierre Wood and Jonas Gray. At the midway point of the 2011 season, Wood (nickname still pending) and Gray (Meatball has already stuck) haven’t reached the cult status of some of the hallowed duos of a generation past, but they have run the Irish ground attack into some pretty rarified air, waking up some echoes that many Irish fans had long forgotten when it came to running the football effectively.

For much of the past 25 years, running the ball has been embedded into the DNA of the Fighting Irish. When Lou Holtz took over the Notre Dame football program in 1986, he immediately pronounced the Irish a ground machine, relying on a steady rotation of ball carriers to power the Irish offense. In Holtz’s first season, the Irish averaged 189.4 yards a game rushing, good for 33rd in the nation. The Irish wouldn’t average less than 215 yards a game or finish worse than 20th in the country again until 1997, the first year of the Bob Davie era. Davie had some football teams that were adept at running the ball — his 1998 and 2000 teams both averaged more than 200 yards a game. But the Irish running games that moved so efficiently under Holtz’s saw a steady decline in efficiency in the tail end of the Davie era, and then a precipitous drop when Tyrone Willingham and Charlie Weis took over the Irish program, with the Irish failing to average 4.0 yards a carry in seven of the eight seasons between the two coaches.

There are plenty of logical reasons why the Irish running game has taken a step back in the years since Holtz coached in South Bend. Passing quarterbacks like Brady Quinn and Jimmy Clausen do nothing to help a team’s rushing average (especially with sack yardage counting against the running totals). Plus, Holtz’s teams never liked passing that much either, with the Irish ranking in the top 50 in passing offense only once, with the 1992 team tying for 49th best in the country.

The Irish will never return to the days of averaging 250 yards on the ground a game, like they did under Holtz. The sports has changed too much and the Irish have too much talent at wide receiver, tight end, and quarterback. But for the first time in almost two decades, Brian Kelly has put together a rushing attack that embodies the great days of old.

With Cierre Wood averaging 5.8 yards a carry and on pace to run for 1,400 yards, the Irish look to have their most prolific runner since Reggie Brooks ran for 1,343 yards in 1992. (With a breakout game, Wood could also put Vagas Ferguson‘s 1,437 yard 1979 season in in his sights.) After a slow start, Jonas Gray’s 8.4 yards a carry have forced Kelly to give the powerful senior a bigger role in the rushing attack, and the duo — along with one of the best Irish offensive lines in the past two decades — has put the Irish ground game into some hallowed space after six games.

Even at its most explosive, no Irish ground game under Holtz ran for six yards a carry, like the Irish are doing at the midpoint of the regular season. With both Wood and Gray on pace to get 100 carries each, the Irish one-two punch ranks up there with Jerome Bettis and Tony Brooks in 1991 and Bettis and Reggie Brooks in 1992 as the top duos of the last 25 years. (The 1991 rushing attack was so prolific that senior Rodney Culver averaged 5.6 yards a carry on 114 carries.)

Operating from a spread formation, the process might look vastly different than it did 20 years ago, but the results are the same. Ed Warinner‘s run game relies on time-tested power, counter and zone blocking concepts, while doing it exclusively from a one-back set. Those that pine for the day of Joe Moore‘s offensive line pulling and leading the way are seeing the modern version, with center Braxston Cave, and guards Chris Watt and Trevor Robinson just as likely leading the way around the outside.

With Andrew Hendrix added into the mix against Air Force, the Irish averaged over nine yards a carry against the Falcons while adding a quarterback running option to Kelly’s spread system. As the running game hits its stride and Tommy Rees gets the pass attack playing at a more efficient level, the Irish offense is on track to be one of the most balanced units in school history.

After six football games, Wood and Gray are on pace to do something special. While their Q Rating and nicknames need work, HollyWood and Meatball could go down in the record books.

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Friday notes: QBs, Miffed recruits, and more

Getty Images - Jonathan Daniel

For much of the offseason, recruiting stories have focused on two quarterbacks that have become the apple of the Irish coaching staff’s eye: Maty Mauk and Gunner Kiel. The two quarterbacks both have ties to the Irish program — Mauk’s brother Ben played under Kelly at Cincinnati and has gushed openly about BK’s offense. Kiel is from Indiana, has family lineage that includes former Irish quarterback Blair Kiel, and also happens to be one of the top-rated prospects in the country, an almost certain five-star recruit.

With the plethora of scholarships on the table right now in Irish recruiting, quarterback offers are few and far between with Mauk and Kiel joined by dual-threat quarterbacks Cyler Miles and Jameis Winston as the only four quarterbacks with offers on the table. But the Irish might be adding another name to the mix, with Buffalo’s Chad Kelly, nephew to Hall of Famer Jim Kelly, recently getting a visit from none other than Bob Diaco.

IrishIllustrated.com has more on the details:

“Coach Diaco was in last week,” said Kelly, a 6-foot-3, 205-pound dual-threat quarterback. “I got a few e-mails from (Notre Dame) last season but this was the first time (they visited).”

Kelly didn’t have the chance to talk with Diaco, but St. Joseph’s head coach did and he relayed a message to his quarterback.

“Coach Diaco talked to my coach and said that I’m very worthy of a scholarship and what not,” Kelly said.

Kelly seems like another intriguing prospect, with a reported 4.5 forty time posted last year at the Ohio State camp. He’s obviously got impressive bloodlines as well. With Mauk and/or Kiel likely at the top of both the coaching staff’s board as well as the probability chart, the coaching staff is showing once again that under Kelly, recruiting coordinator Chuck Martin and in-house director Dave Peloquin, that they’re covering all their bases.


One recruit that’s no longer on Notre Dame’s radar is recent Michigan commit Joe Bolden. The outside linebacker, and former teammate of incoming Irish freshman Jarrett Grace, gave some eye-opening quotes to writer Kyle Warber, reported on MLive.com:

When you tell a 6-foot-3, 230 pound linebacker he is “too small,” especially a player with the pedigree of JoeBolden, don’t be surprised if he looks forward to “beating the tar out of you” every year.

“Being told I am too small,” Bolden admitted, “when I have never heard that before, it was an eye opener. Notre Dame told me they wanted a 6-foot-4 linebacker and that I am ‘not their guy.’ I’m not upset if I don’t fit your profile, I was just surprised it was about height, because I have always believed that it’s not the size of the dog, but it’s the dogs bite.”

Now Bolden is relishing the opportunity to take a big bite out of Notre Dame (Ohio State too), including getting the better of old teammate and great friend Jarrett Grace, who currently plays for the Irish.

“It will be good to walk over and shake the Notre Dame coaches’ hands and say thank you for giving me the drive to be even better,” Bolden said.

For Irish fans looking to gloat, it might feel nice to know that Michigan’s most coveted recruit is a guy that the coaching staff didn’t see as worthy of an offer. (Then again, that’s a risky proposition, especially considering guys like A.J. Edds, the former Iowa linebacker and 4th round pick, basically begged for an Irish offer.) But looking at this analytically, it’s just another example of Notre Dame knowing exactly what it’s looking for when it comes to position groupings and recruiting “fits,” and it seems like the coaching staff had the discipline to stick with their convictions and bring in the players they know will work within the confines of their defense.

Either way, remember the name Joe Bolden. It’ll be interesting to see how this one plays out…


ESPN and College Football Live took a look at Notre Dame, which they’ve got pegged at No. 17 in the way-too-early 2011 preseason polls. The panel was moderated by Kirk Herbstreit and included Craig James, Jesse Palmer and some guy named Urban Meyer.

Take seven-plus minutes to watch the video, and then I’ll come back with some commentary:

Okay, here goes:

It’s a little disappointing that of all people, Herbstreit’s little “nugget” is probably the most preposterous statement of anybody’s, including the notorious Brad James. Herbie’s note that the first round draft drought the Irish have suffered at running back and receiver since Jerome Bettis in 1993 helps explain why the Irish have had woes since Lou Holtz is beyond misleading.

Of course, on the surface this sounds like sound logic. But dig a little deeper (as our friends at the blog formerly known as BlueGraySky did) and this is one step short of Herbstreit’s “high school defense” theory that looked quite silly as last season wore on.

Until this year’s draft, Alabama has had only one running back or wide receiver (Shaun Alexander in 2000) taken in the first round since 1974, when Wilbur Jackson went to the 49ers. Even more incredible, only three tailbacks or wide receivers at Alabama have been taken in the first round in the entire history of the NFL Draft.

Sure, Herbstreit’s comments sound good in an eight-minute roundtable discussion, but when presented against a program as prestigious as Alabama, you realize that it’s a pretty worthless evidence.

One note probably more interesting than any other? It’s that Urban Meyer — the only guy on that panel that’s seen Notre Dame in person since last football season — was the most bullish on the Irish.

“I think they’ve got the right guy,” Meyer said of Brian Kelly taking the reins of the program. “I don’t think — I know they got the right coach.”



As if his performance on the NFL Network’s draft coverage wasn’t enough, apparently Brian Kelly is working to get his SAG Card.

“Get that chocolate milk!”