Tag: John Turner

Rice v Notre Dame

Irish A-to-Z: John Turner


John Turner went from the bottom of the safety depth chart to the top of the outside linebackers in a spring, one of the primary beneficiaries of the transition to defensive coordinator Brian VanGorder. And while Turner was surpassed by converted wide receiver James Onwualu, the Indianapolis native supplied key support in special teams while providing some athleticism at a position that desperately needed it.

Back for what could be his final season in South Bend, Turner has a chance to make a name for himself doing some dirty work on special teams, while also providing top notch leadership as the Irish try to take a step forward.

Let’s take a closer look at what Turner can do during 2015.


6’0.5″, 220 lbs.
Senior, No. 31, S



He earned a scholarship offer from Notre Dame after performing well at the school’s summer camp. Turner had a mostly regional offer list, but chose the Irish almost immediately after the offer, turning down in-state Indiana, Minnesota and a group of MAC programs.

Far from an elite recruit, Notre Dame’s staff got a look at the Indianapolis safety, a recruit who was one of the staff’s first blocks as they began rebuilding their efforts in the Hoosier state’s capital city.

Freshman Season (2012): Did not see action.

Sophomore Season (2013): Played in 13 games, mostly on special teams. Made four tackles on the season, including two against Navy.

Junior Season (2014): Played in all 13 games, mostly on special teams. Converted to outside linebacker during spring football but moved back to safety during the season.



Turner didn’t managed to spend much time on the field, with VanGorder and the staff utilizing Onwualu when they needed an outside linebacker.

Kelly and his staff evaluate players by a variety of metrics. Championship player, winning player, replacement-level player and down the line. Turner likely slots in at that winning player level, capable of helping the Irish win, but still a rung or two short of being a starter on a playoff contending team.

But as the Irish begin to recruit to VanGorder’s profile, being on the radar isn’t enough. Turner needs to step his game up or risk being passed by a younger generation hand-picked by his defensive coordinator’s evaluation tools.

Yet if you want an optimistic take on Turner’s ability to help the Irish, consider his pedigree. That RKG background, developed as a state champion at a Catholic school in state, will help him become the type of program player that Kelly can feel safe building around.

In 2014, Turner will be an important piece of the puzzle, especially as Onwualu learns on the fly and Councell returns from an ACL injury. Moving forward, he’ll be challenged, and we’ll ultimately see if Turner thrives or moves to the background.



At this point, Turner looks like a special teams contributor unless something drastic happens at safety. With an infusion of really young talent and Jaylon Smith’s ability to cross train, outside linebacker isn’t even Turner’s position, he’s back to being a safety, even if he’s not necessarily capable of being a half-field player.

All that being said, Turner will prove his contributions to the team on cover teams, serving as a key tackler on Scott Booker’s special teams units. While Turner seems on track to play out his collegiate career very close to his recruiting ranking, he has a fifth year of eligibility remaining if he and the Irish staff believe there’s something to be gained from returning in 2016. Otherwise, he could find his way onto another program and utilize the graduate transfer program or just graduate from Notre Dame and go pro in something other than sports.



Not everybody can be a starter, and Turner will prove his value if he’s a consistent special teams performer. He’s got nice size at 220 pounds and will be a weapon on cover teams.

If the Irish get anything from Turner on defense, it’s likely a product of a really difficult depth chart situation, meaning injuries took over. But he’ll be ready for the opportunity and filled some holes at safety this spring when injuries took over.

If I’m guessing, the senior will be asked to do his job, mostly making tackles on 4th down.


THE 2015 IRISH A-to-Z
Josh Adams, RB
Josh Barajas, OLB
Nicky Baratti, S
Alex Bars, OL
Asmar Bilal, OLB
Hunter Bivin, OL
Grant Blankenship, DE
Jonathan Bonner, DE
Miles Boykin, WR
Justin Brent, WR
Greg Bryant, RB
Devin Butler, CB
Jimmy Byrne, OL
Daniel Cage, DL
Amir Carlisle, RB
Nick Coleman, DB
Te’von Coney, LB
Shaun Crawford, DB
Scott Daly, LS
Sheldon Day, DL
Michael Deeb, LB
Micah Dew-Treadway, DL
Steve Elmer, RG
Matthias Farley, DB
Nicco Fertitta, DB
Tarean Folston, RB
Will Fuller, WR
Jarrett Grace, LB
Jalen Guyton, WR
Mark Harrell, OL
Jay Hayes, DL
Mike Heuerman, TE
Kolin Hill, DE
Tristen Hoge, C
Corey Holmes, WR
Chase Hounshell, TE
Torii Hunter, Jr. WR
Alizé Jones, TE
Jarron Jones, DL
DeShone Kizer, QB
Tyler Luatua, TE
Cole Luke, CB
Nick Martin, C
Greer Martini, LB
Jacob Matuska, DL
Mike McGlinchey, OT
Colin McGovern, OL
Peter Mokwuah, DL
John Montelus, OL
Nyles Morgan, LB
Sam Mustipher, OL
Quenton Nelson, OL
Tyler Newsome, P
Romeo Okwara, DE
James Onwualu, LB
C.J. Prosise, WR/RB
Doug Randolph, LB/DE
Max Redfield, S
Corey Robinson, WR
Trevor Ruhland, OL
CJ Sanders, WR
Joe Schmidt, LB
Avery Sebastian, S
Elijah Shumate, S
Jaylon Smith, LB
Durham Smythe, TE
Equanimeous St. Brown, WR
Ronnie Stanley, LT
Elijah Taylor, DL
Brandon Tiassum, DL
Jerry Tillery, DL
Drue Tranquill, S
Andrew Trumbetti, DE


Post-spring stock report: Secondary

Michigan v Notre Dame

With the majority of Notre Dame’s starting lineup returning for 2015, the Irish spent spring practice knowing what their team would look like. But for Brian VanGorder and new secondary coach Todd Lyght, getting improvement out of the returning depth chart was critical.

At safety, there is no legitimate option behind Max Redfield and Elijah Shumate, as Nicky Baratti and Drue Tranquill return from surgery. Redfield and Shumate were highly-touted recruits, and both have spent multiple years in the program. While the system change made things tough on the back end of the defense, one full year in, both players are expected to take a big jump forward.

At cornerback, the Irish await KeiVarae Russell‘s return. Paired with Cole Luke, Notre Dame has two front-line covermen who will be asked to do more than drop and play zone. Once again, behind the starters is where the concern begins.

Sophomore Nick Watkins pulled even with Devin Butler, who struggled mightily down the stretch in place of Cody Riggs. Graduate transfer Avery Sebastian joins the program this June, hoping to infusing some athleticism and earn a role like Riggs did in 2014.

While some promising freshmen get to campus this summer, let’s take a look at the secondary with spring practice in the rearview mirror.



CB: Cole Luke, Jr. (5-11, 190)
S: Max Redfield, Jr. (6-1, 198)
S: Elijah Shumate, Sr. (6-0, 213)
CB: Nick Watkins, Soph. (6-0, 200)

CB: Devin Butler, Jr. (6-.5, 195)
CB: Matthias Farley, GS (5-11, 205)
S: Nicky Baratti, Sr.* (6-1, 205)
S: Drue Tranquill, Soph. (6-1.5, 225)
S: John Turner, Sr.* (6-.5, 225)

*Denotes fifth year available



Max Redfield: That Redfield took last season’s demotion and struggles and came out the other side is a big victory. The Irish absolutely need one of their best athletes to play like one of their best defenders, and in many ways, Todd Lyght’s arrival was the perfect thing to happen to Redfield and Shumate.

A new voice will give each safety a fresh start, and early reports are that Redfield is thriving. There’s nothing stopping Redfield from being a standout player. With a year of knowledge and last season’s experience behind him, a big jump looks probable—or at least what many hope. Redfield could be the Irish’s best safety since Harrison Smith.


Nick Watkins: While he saw the field and played a role on special teams in 2014, Watkins didn’t find much playing time in the secondary. After Brian VanGorder acknowledged Watkins’ struggles fitting into the defense, Watkins took a step forward this spring when he began taking first-team reps across from Luke, continuing in that spot through the Blue-Gold game.

Sure, Watkins got beat long by Will Fuller for a 70-yard touchdown. But outside of that mistake (and Fuller can do it to anyone), he looked competitive and challenged opponents on every rep.

KeiVarae Russell will be back in the starting lineup soon enough. But a third corner is a key role, and Watkins proved himself capable for the job before a freshman like Shaun Crawford comes on campus to battle for it.


Drue Tranquill: After tearing his ACL against Louisville, that Tranquill was participating in spring practice and running and cutting on his surgically repaired knee was miraculous. Even more impressive? If the Blue-Gold game was against Texas, Brian Kelly said Tranquill would’ve been on the field and playing.

As a key piece of Notre Dame’s sub-packages, Tranquill fits into the defense perfectly. While he struggled as a half-field safety after Redfield and Shumate were relegated to the dog house, Tranquill’s speedy recovery is critical to the Irish defense, allowing VanGorder to mix and match on the back end.



Elijah Shumate: It was a quiet spring for the rising senior, who all of a sudden is out of eligibility after 2015. After serving as a key nickel cornerback during 2012 and struggling through injuries in 2013, Shumate needs to step forward as the Irish’s strong safety in 2015.

A physical freak and one of the team’s hardest hitters, Shumate has potential to play at the next level. But his game tape needs to match up with his skill set, and we’ll see if that happens come September.


Matthias Farley: The Irish’s best playmaker on the backend last year, Farley enters next season with no job carved out for him. And while he cross-trained at safety to help with depth issues, we’d be foolish to think that just because the lineup doesn’t have a spot for him that Farley won’t make one.

Farley’s best served in the slot, playing close to the line of scrimmage and using his physicality. And as we watch the Irish offense work to get the best 11 players on the field, at this point, Farley’s made a convincing argument that he fits in that group on defense.



Devin Butler: Late last season, Butler struggled with what golfers call a two-way miss. Only instead of missing the fairway both left and right, Butler was letting receivers beat him short and also over the top. (That ain’t good.)

While Butler has shown some playmaking ability in limited action, finding a role in this secondary after sliding behind Watkins could be tough, provided everybody stays healthy.

Entering his junior season, Butler has played in 25 of 26 games the past two seasons. So thinking he’ll be relegated to the bench is rather stupid. But if this spring was an opportunity for Butler to shine, it appears that Watkins pulled even and past him, putting Butler’s place in the two-deep in trouble, as he’ll likely be behind Russell this fall—who won’t be coming off the field.


John Turner: What a difference a spring makes. After pushing his way into the starting lineup at outside linebacker last spring, Turner shifted back to safety to provide depth. While the veteran will likely play a key role on special teams, Turner doesn’t look like he’ll be in the mix for playing time in the secondary, as long as everybody stays healthy.



Spring Solutions: Linebackers

Jaylon Smith, Joe Schmidt

A position group that started last spring as one of the biggest question marks on the defense enters spring practice with the chance to be the most talented unit on the field.

With Mike Elston now coaching linebackers, the veteran coach inherits a group that returns every starter, including depth like freshmen All-American Nyles Morgan and hopefully healthy 2013 starter Jarrett Grace.

Jaylon Smith is everybody’s All-American candidate. Joe Schmidt was the team MVP. James Onwualu returns, almost an afterthought after pushing into the starting lineup after a transition from wide receiver.

As Schmidt works back from the broken ankle suffered against Navy last season, this group needs to spend spring proving that it can succeed without the former walk-on in the middle of the action.

The defense fell off a cliff last year, as even the athleticism Morgan possessed couldn’t make up for the brain drain. So with spring football just around the corner, let’s take a closer look at a position group that is fast becoming stocked with athletes.



Jaylon Smith, Jr. 
Joe Schmidt, Grad Student
James Onwualu, Jr.
Nyles Morgan, Soph.
Jarrett Grace, Grad Student
Greer Martini, Soph. 
Kolin Hill, Soph.
Ben Councell, Grad Student
John Turner, Jr.*
Michael Deeb, Jr.*
Doug Randolph, Jr.*
Tevon Coney, Fr.

It’s unlikely that this group all stays at linebacker this spring. Reports have surfaced that both Michael Deeb and Doug Randolph will be transitioning to defensive end this spring. Kolin Hill essentially served as a speed rusher last season as well.

Councell’s future is up in the air as well, a return to the depth chart as a physical presence not assured, especially with scholarship numbers being tight.

Let’s dive in as we look at some spring objectives.



Jaylon Smith: Smith successfully transitioned to the Will linebacker spot, moving inside after playing outside as a freshman. While Smith’s numbers and eye-popping athleticism contributed to some All-American honors, the young linebacker is still a work in progress.

Where Smith plays now that the depth chart doesn’t demand Smith on the inside remains to be seen. He could be unleashed as an edge player if Jarrett Grace is healthy enough to play inside. (Or Nyles Morgan forces his way onto the field.)

I don’t think the staff is inclined to move Smith outside after working so hard with Smith to play the Will. But if the Irish are looking to get their three best linebackers on the field, Smith’s ability to play in space will allow him to be flexible.

We’ve all just assumed Smith was the type of player to be a potential first-rounder after his junior season. Well, we’re already here. Let’s see if Smith’s development is on track.

Joe Schmidt: We’ve already seen Schmidt prove he can play at a very high level. Now he needs to spend this spring getting healthy, with his rehab from surgery forcing him off the field.

The worries of Schmidt’s size and some difficult matchups never materialized. Now Schmidt’s role as a leader on this team will hopefully hold his position group to a higher standard, with hopes of getting the rest of the position’s Football IQ up to Schmidt’s level.

Get healthy, Joe. Until then, he’ll keep leading this position group by example.

James Onwualu: It’s almost fashionable to count Onwualu out. With Morgan ascending and Onwualu playing a complementary role in the Irish defense in 2014, some assume he’ll be bumped from the starting lineup.

But that kind of thinking has fueled Onwualu his entire career. It helped him earn scholarship offers, helped him get onto the field as a freshman wide receiver and helped him jump the line into the starting lineup in his first extended time playing defense since moonlighting there in his high school career.

Big, strong and physical linebackers who were athletic enough to play wide receiver always have a spot on a defense like this. So this spring, expect to hear about the great strides Onwualu has made in the training program… and watch as his mental game steps forward as well.

Nyles Morgan: As a freshman, Morgan proved that his reputation as a tackling machine was warranted. This spring, he needs to continue his evolution as a linebacker, mastering the Xs and Os that are needed to be a top competitor.

The ability to be a great one is clearly there. Now he’ll compete with two veterans—Jarrett Grace and Schmidt—as he forces his way into the lineup, trying to prove he’s one of the team’s best three linebackers, with No. 1 and 2 (assuming Schmidt’s healthy) already well established.

Jarrett Grace: No player on this roster deserves a happy ending more than Grace. After a catastrophic injury suffered against Arizona State in 2013, Grace’s recovery from multiple broken bones in his leg took longer than anyone wanted.

Brian Kelly has kept us up to speed on Grace’s rehab, sometimes more optimistic about his progress than anybody should be. But there’s a reason to show hope after hearing about Grace beating Jaylon Smith in quickness drills, and anything the Irish get out of Grace in 2015 will be gravy.

That makes spring essential for getting the rust off, and also proving to the coaches and Grace himself that his football career—which once looked all but over—is back on track.

Greer Martini: Considered one of the least heralded recruits to enter the program last year, Martini quickly proved himself to be a more than capable football player, contributing on special teams and working his way into the mix at linebacker almost immediately.

Martini jump-started his development as injuries hit the depth chart. Now as a sophomore, he’ll need to take this spring to prove that those advancements weren’t solely based on attrition.

The reported moves of Randolph and Deeb make it seem like Martini is here to stay and a trusted piece of the future plans. We’ll find out if that’s the case in a few weeks.

Kolin Hill: After making his mark early in the season as a pass rusher, Hill got lost in the shuffle late in the season, losing his spot as a situational pass rusher to veteran Anthony Rabasa.

Hill may only be listed as a linebacker, though his not-quite adequate length (he’s 6-foot-1.5) could necessitate Hill staying in a two-point stance instead of working exclusively as a defensive end.

Continuing his work with Mike Elston, Hill is in for an important spring, especially with his ability to chase the quarterback still very much in demand.

Ben Councell: An original prototype for the 3-4 outside linebacker job, Councell’s spot in this program is still up in the air. A knee injury slowed down Councell’s development. So did falling behind players like Danny Spond and Jaylon Smith.

Councell is a big-bodied athlete, and someone who looks the part of a key defender. After hearing Kelly talk about the important role Councell would play in the defense, we really didn’t see too much of it in 2014.

But as a 260-pounder, Councell has value. But we’ll find out what the Irish staff thinks it is, with his return still up in the air and his role still undetermined.

John Turner: Last year’s spring star, Turner lost the starting outside linebacker job to James Onwualu. This spring, he’ll face more competition, though he could also see some reps at the strong safety position as well with Drue Tranquill returning from injury and the depth chart mighty thin.

One of the big questions about Turner was his ability to run. After being buried as a safety, his size and speed combo played well as a linebacker in space. But if Turner is going to prove his worth to the defense, he’ll need to continue to compete this spring, or else he’ll serve as a depth player and special teams contributor moving forward.

Michael Deeb: It looks as if Deeb will be transitioning to defensive end this spring, a chance to get an impressive looking athlete onto the field. When it took a rash of injuries to get Deeb even on the field against USC (before a play was run, Deeb was subbed out), making the move now to try and find a spot for Deeb makes sense.

Expect to see an even bigger and stronger Deeb come the updated spring roster. A workout warrior, if he can develop as an edge player with a hand on the ground, there’s another intriguing piece that VanGorder can try and utilize.

Doug Randolph: Like Deeb, is sounds like Randolph will be heading over to Keith Gilmore as well. After sitting out as a freshman after shoulder surgery, Randolph was also banged up in 2014, with minor maladies making it difficult for him to get on the field.

The battle at defensive end isn’t as tough as finding playing time as a linebacker, so Randolph will likely garner some kind words from the defensive coaching staff. And he’s a plenty impressive looking player, with his high school tape showing some edge abilities.

So spring will be spent transitioning to a new job. Consider Randolph a candidate for a spring breakout.

Tevon Coney: Welcome to college, kid. Now find your way onto the field with this depth chart. In reality, Coney is playing behind two fifth-year middle linebackers, an All-American and a freshman All-American.

Where Coney starts his career will be interesting. He could be a natural at the will, though he’s marked as a mike linebacker entering. But as a shorter player who relies on speed and instincts, getting some space in front of him could be key.

Fifteen practices is a nice jumpstart to a career. Learning about life in South Bend and getting on the field will be key towards beginning his pursuit of playing time.

Until we see him in something other than a high school YouTube highlight package, let’s reserve judgment.

Irish A-to-Z: John Turner

John Turner

After being buried on the safety depth chart, junior John Turner became one of the talks of spring practice when he moved from forgotten man to a potential starter at outside linebacker. A jumbo-sized safety unable to get on the field under Bob Diaco, Turner exited spring practice as the starter at sam linebacker.

While Turner may have lost the starting job to sophomore James Onwualu, he’s still capable of supplying key depth at a position that relies on a blend of speed and physicality. An Indianapolis product who earned his way onto the roster by performing well at Notre Dame’s summer camp, Turner reclaimed his career as the Irish system changed under Brian VanGorder.

Let’s take a closer look at the in-state product.


6’0.5″ 225 lbs.
Junior, No. 31



Turner had mostly a regional offer from colleges, deciding between MAC offers, in-state Indiana and Minnesota before the Irish coaching staff offered him after he ran a 4.5 forty at Notre Dame’s summer camp. From there, Turner didn’t wait long, pledging to the Irish and shutting it down.

Kelly talked about Turner on Signing Day, applauding his fit after playing for the state champ’s at Cathedral, taking a page out of the RKG manual.

“If there is a current theme in terms of the kids and what we’re looking for, for them to be the right fit here at Notre Dame, John is certainly that,” Kelly said. “Now there is more to it than that, you have to be a really good football player, too, and we got a chance to spend time with John.  He was here on campus, we really loved him in person and in personal workouts, and he carried that on to the field.”



Freshman Season (2012): Did not see action.

Sophomore Season (2013): Played in 13 games, mostly on special teams. Made four tackles on the season, including two against Navy.



What a difference a system makes. For Turner, he went from forgotten man to a fringe starter. Of course, he’s already lost the job to Onwualu, a converted wide receiver that spent the first half of spring playing safety. But Turner looks like a guy that VanGorder can get something out of, and that’s more than what we could say under Diaco.

Ultimately, Turner looks the part of a hybrid safety-linebacker, and at 225 pounds he’s got the physicality to play in the box or in space. But entering his third year in the Irish program, we’ll see if his modest offers end up an indicator to his talent level or if Kelly and company unearthed another diamond.



Kelly and his staff evaluate players by a variety of metrics. Championship player, winning player, replacement-level player and down the line. Turner likely slots in at that winning player level, capable of helping the Irish win, but still a rung or two short of being a starter on a playoff contending team.

But as the Irish begin to recruit to VanGorder’s profile, being on the radar isn’t enough. Turner needs to step his game up or risk being passed by a younger generation hand-picked by his defensive coordinator’s evaluation tools.

Yet if you want an optimistic take on Turner’s ability to help the Irish, consider his pedigree. That RKG background, developed as a state champion at a Catholic school in state, will help him become the type of program player that Kelly can feel safe building around.

In 2014, Turner will be an important piece of the puzzle, especially as Onwualu learns on the fly and Councell returns from an ACL injury. Moving forward, he’ll be challenged, and we’ll ultimately see if Turner thrives or moves to the background.



The Irish A-to-Z
Josh Atkinson
Nicky Baratti
Alex Bars
Hunter Bivin
Grant Blankenship
Jonathan Bonner
Justin Brent
Kyle Brindza
Chris Brown
Jalen Brown
Greg Bryant
Devin Butler
Jimmy Byrne
Daniel Cage
Amir Carlisle
Austin Collinsworth
Ben Councell
Scott Daly
Sheldon Day
Michael Deeb
Steve Elmer
Matthias Farley
Tarean Folston
Will Fuller
Everett Golson
Jarrett Grace
Conor Hanratty
Eilar Hardy
Mark Harrell
Jay Hayes
Matt Hegarty
Mike Heuerman
Kolin Hill
Corey Holmes
Chase Hounshell
Torii Hunter Jr.
Jarron Jones
DeShone Kizer
Ben Koyack
Christian Lombard
Tyler Luatua
Cole Luke
Nick Martin
Greer Martini
Jacob Matuska
Cam McDaniel
Mike McGlinchey
Colin McGovern
Pete Mokwuah
John Montelus
Kendall Moore
Nyles Morgan
Sam Mustipher
Quenton Nelson
Tyler Newsome
Romeo Okwara
James Onwualu
C.J. Prosise
Anthony Rabasa
Doug Randolph
Max Redfield
Cody Riggs
Corey Robinson
Isaac Rochell
KeiVarae Russell
Joe Schmidt
Elijah Shumate
Jaylon Smith
Durham Smythe
Ronnie Stanley
Drue Tranquill
Andrew Trumbetti


Open Practice update: Saturday’s Six Pack of observations

Notre Dame at USC

Saturday morning, Notre Dame’s practice was open to visiting coaches and local media. That means a slew of reports coming in and one guy (me) to read everything and give you some interesting observations.

While I wasn’t in South Bend for a two hour window into spring installation, consider this a trip around the horn as we piece together interesting insights and observations from the Irish’s fifth spring practice.

Here’s your bonus Saturday six pack after an open spring practice.

1. John Turner is no longer a forgotten man. 

I’m resisting the urge to turn him into a spring star, if only because we’ve had breakout spring sensations turn into pumpkins before. (Remember when Kona Schwenke had overtaken Louis Nix for the starting nose guard job?)

But Turner has clearly found a niche in Brian VanGorder’s defense, and the rising junior seems to be taking advantage of his opportunities.

“He’s been given a great opportunity here. We all knew about his physical ability. Now he’s been given a chance that is an incredible opportunity,” Brian Kelly said after practice Saturday. “We knew he had the ability to do it. Now he’s been given the chance to do it. I don’t know if he really had the chance last year, to be quite honest with you.”

After struggling to build a personnel package that allowed the Irish to match up well in nickel and dime sets early in his time in South Bend, just about every viewing window into practice has shown the Irish playing from various sub-packages. With a lot of talented players in the back end of the defense, Turner looks like he’s filling a role as a nickel linebacker with coverage skills and the ability to tackle.

Converted wide receiver James Onwualu spent quite a bit of practice there as well.

2. Amir Carlisle has recaptured his mojo. 

One look at the latest UND.com practice report gives you an idea of Amir Carlisle’s resurgence after a tough 2013 season. Spending his time exclusively at the slot receiver position, Carlisle was a reliable target, making multiple tough catches in traffic and being utilized in the passing game.

Kelly talked about the step forward Carlisle’s taken now that he’s plugged in at the slot.

“He’s just kind of going through the process of finding a home in a sense,” Kelly said. “Last year he didn’t really get into a rhythm offensively at running back, and then he’s playing a little bit of slash slot.

“Now he’s playing full-time at the receiver position. I think he’s getting into a consistent role. I think that’s very, very important for him. It’s helping a lot.”

Carlisle broke his collarbone early last spring, shortening his developmental process in the Irish offense. Getting all 15 practices this spring will really help him focus on the nuances of the position while building a rapport with his quarterbacks.

We’re still a long way from the last day of August. But Carlisle is a really talented football player who might now be playing the right position for him.

3. Everett Golson still has a little rust on him. 

It’s hard for some Irish fans to remember, but in the last three years Everett Golson has only played in 12 football games. Twelve? Twelve. (And three of those, he failed to break the 50 percent marker in passing accuracy.)

So while everybody expected Golson to immediately be the tonic that solved the Irish’s offensive struggles, it’s going to take more than five practices for Golson to get on the same page with a rebuilt offense.

“I don’t think he’s feeling comfortable yet. I think he’s still trying to find that,” Kelly said. “He doesn’t have any of the guys. He doesn’t have TJ. Daniels isn’t here. All the guys that he had a little bit of that timing with, he’s working with all new guys. He doesn’t have any of that. It’s really like he’s working with a whole new cast of characters in that sense.”

The early reviews from Saturday’s open practice called Golson more steady than spectacular. But any sense that the rebuilding defense would be overwhelmed by a high-powered offense this spring hasn’t happened yet, as the timing has been off and the offense is far from hitting on all cylinders.

4. Even though Golson will win the starting job, Malik Zaire could have an important role in this offense.

One of the biggest surprises of spring camp seems to be the athleticism of Malik Zaire. Put candidly, he’s a far more dynamic athlete in the open field than Golson. That shocks a lot of people, and could give Kelly and offensive coordinator Mike Denbrock another fancy car in the garage as they start to game plan for next season.

After all the grumbling about patching together the offense with multiple quarterbacks, Tim Prister of Irish Illustrated asked Kelly after practice Saturday if he’d be comfortable doing it again in 2014. The answer shouldn’t surprise you.

“I’ll do anything to win. If I felt like when we got to August, that is where we were, I’m all in,” Kelly said. “I can handle that. I think the ideal situation is one, but (Zaire) definitely has shown in himself to be ready to compete in some of those areas that you mentioned. I want to see him compete in all those areas. That’s a really good thing.”

5. Don’t expect Christian Lombard’s injury to cost him a starting job. 

After some speculation across the interwebs had Christian Lombard’s wrist injury a potential Wally Pipp situation, Kelly threw some cold water on that Saturday afternoon, all but assuring his return to the starting lineup at right guard.

“I would think he’d be really hard to beat out. He’s such a veteran, a senior,” Kelly said. “It just puts Harry (Hiestand) back to nine guys again, which he’s used to, unfortunately. Just makes us thinner at offensive line. You’d be hard-pressed to get a guy to unseat Lombard in there, he’s such a tough guy.”

While Conor Hanratty will do a solid job filling in to finish spring practice for Lombard and Matt Hegarty is doing the same at center for Nick Martin, it appears that the offensive line is coming together.

Ronnie Stanley, LT
Steve Elmer, LG
Nick Martin, C
Christian Lombard, RG
Mike McGlinchey, RT

6. KeiVarae Russell expects the team to play a whole bunch of man coverage. 

Notre Dame’s best cornerback was available to the media after practice and opened up about the difference in responsibilities for cornerbacks under Brian VanGorder. Put simply? There’s going to be a lot more man coverage.

BlueandGold.com’s Lou Somogyi caught up with the fast-talking cornerback, who sounded more than excited about the opportunity to play aggressively in VanGorder’s defense after mostly playing zone coverage under Bob Diaco.

“Coach D, he wanted to keep everything in front because big plays really cause losing,” Russell told Blue & Gold. “In 2012 we played a lot of zone as well, but we didn’t give up any big plays. Last year, the games we lost … it’s always big plays that cost us.

“Coach D’s philosophy was great but we never could really cause many turnovers just because we weren’t really aggressive. This one, there will be a lot of turnovers caused … (VanGorder) wants you to cover every single route. Two-yard curl, he wants you on it. That’s his mind-set: Don’t give them anything.

“Coach Diaco, it was more, ‘Give them this, give them that, give them the five-yard out, because it won’t beat us.’ Coach Diaco believes that big plays cause losing, and Coach VanGorder is, ‘Whatever happens, happens. But we want you on it and go from there.'”

Most that have seen Cody Riggs play expect him to walk in and play immediately at corner or nickel back. Cole Luke has the ability to be a very good cover corner. While Devin Butler recovers from shoulder surgery, the Irish staff got great things out of him during his freshman season. Sprinkle in contributors like Matthias Farley and this is the deepest cornerback group I can remember in South Bend.