Tag: Kyle McCarthy

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Kyle McCarthy: Blessed with ND football during cancer fight


Throughout the ups and downs of the football season, one thing was a constant in graduate assistant Kyle McCarthy‘s first season of coaching. A life or death battle with cancer.

The former Notre Dame safety and team captain returned to campus this year, starting a life in coaching after his NFL career was cut short by injuries. But in the early days of that new journey, McCarthy’s coaching career was sidetracked after he was diagnosed with Stage Three Testicular Cancer.

Before Saturday’s game, the NBC team profiled McCarthy and took a closer look at his fight. And amidst a football season that’s not always had happy endings ever Saturday, McCarthy delivered a much-needed victory of his own when he was declared cancer free last week.

Here’s a look at the profile of McCarthy’s and how he used coaching as an outlet in his battle with cancer.


Kyle McCarthy announces he’s cancer free

Washington v Notre Dame

Notre Dame graduate assistant Kyle McCarthy took to Twitter to share the good news that he’s been given a cancer-free diagnosis. The former Irish captain had been battling an undisclosed type of cancer since earlier this year, staying with the team throughout surgery and multiple treatments.

McCarthy gave the following update via Twitter, declaring himself free of Stage 3 Testicular Cancer:

“Since being diagnosed with Stage 3 Testicular Cancer in July, I’ve had overwhelming support from so many people. I appreciate each and every one of your thoughts and prayers. This has truly been a humbling and eye-opening experience as I’ve undergone chemotherapy treatments and surgeries to fight this terrible disease. Fortunately this type of cancer was treatable, and with the help of amazing doctors and nurses, and incredible support from family and friends, I was given a clean bill of health. I am officially cancer free. I’m excited to put this behind me and turn the page on this chapter of my life. Thank you all for the support! It helped more than you could know.”

McCarthy is a first-year graduate assistant with the Irish after spending parts of four seasons in the NFL with the Denver Broncos, Kansas City Chiefs and Oakland Raiders. He was working primarily with the safeties this season, assisting defensive backs coach Kerry Cooks.

As a collegiate player, he was a two-year starter for the Irish, captaining the team in 2009. He went over 100 tackles in both 2008 and 2009, totaling 240 career tackles for the Irish, the second most for a defensive back in school history.

While McCarthy has been limited in his working time, the NCAA a allowed former Irish safety Pat Eilers to work with the Notre Dame coaching staff. Eilers is on sabbatical from his job as a partner in a private equity firm for the season.


Eilers joins Irish coaching staff to help fill McCarthy’s void

Notre Dame archives

Former Irish and NFL football player Pat Eilers has joined the Irish coaching staff. The member of the 1988 national championship team has been named a defensive quality control assistant for the coaching staff. Brian Kelly confirmed that Eilers had joined the staff on Sunday after Irish Illustrated’s Tim Prister broke the news earlier this weekend.

As Kelly mentioned when breaking the news that graduate assistant Kyle McCarthy was taking intermittent leaves from his position as he undergoes chemotherapy, the NCAA has given the Irish staff an allowance to fill his role. That made it possible for Eilers to return to campus, in a unique situation.

Eilers was a two-year starter for Lou Holtz, playing on both sides of the ball as both a wide out and defensive back, starting 18 games and making 34 appearances. The Minnesota native also earned a monogram on the 1989 Irish baseball team.

After earning both a biology and mechanical engineering degree from Notre Dame, he spent six seasons playing in the NFL, playing for the Minnesota Vikings, Washington Redskins and the Chicago Bears.

After his football career, Eilers earned an MBA from Northwestern and is currently taking a sabbatical from his job as a managing director at Madison Dearborn Partners, a private equity firm in Chicago.

Eilers has four kids, including two daughters that attend Notre Dame.

What to make of the combine

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The big news of the day is that Notre Dame football players Jimmy Clausen, Kyle McCarthy, Eric Olsen, Golden Tate, and Sam Young are in Indianapolis for the annual NFL Scouting Combine, which starts today.

Draftniks and people like Todd McShay and Mel Kiper will talk about the importance of the Combine and give stock reports on athlete’s workouts as if they were publicly traded stock. That’s only partially true, if you look back at what one NFL executive told Peter King.

But while the top of draft boards may already be made up, there is plenty of moving in the middle rounds if an athlete has a great workout. Bruce Feldman had a great interview with Tony Villani, a trainer that works with a small group of elite athletes each year to prepare them for the combine and it’s pretty hard to argue with the results he’s gotten and the importance the combine workouts had for some of his athletes.

All that being said, here’s a quick look at what the combine means to the Notre Dame athletes that are taking part in the annual cattle call.


Clausen won’t work out at the combine because of offseason toe surgery, but Jimmy’s “stock” will rise and fall with his individual meetings. If you watched Clausen play last season, you’re pretty sure he’s got the arm and IQ needed to make all the plays in an NFL offense. More importantly, if you watched the junior quarterback play, you saw a guy mature and become a leader on the field. What these meetings will decide for teams is if Clausen can be the face of an NFL franchise, playing a position that’s got the highest burn rate in the business. He’ll have the chance to talk about football and what he learned in Charlie Weis’ offense, as well as show teams that he’s dedicated to football. Clausen is projected to go anywhere from the top five to the second round, so the combine is the first step of a very important process. A great interview and an elite throwing session, and Clausen should find himself in contention to be the first quarterback taken in the draft.


McCarthy’s production on the field won’t necessarily convince NFL scouts that he has what it takes to play in the league, even if he did put up a record-setting two year run at safety. A combine where McCarthy shows good speed and athleticism is what he needs to do to put together a draft-worthy portfolio. From people I’ve talked to, McCarthy is all over the board. As I’ve expressed before, they wonder about his ability to cover at the NFL level, though his sheer tackling output gives him special teams value, though that might not be enough to get him taken before the final rounds. All indications are that Kyle could have a future in the NFL, it’ll be up to him to prove that he has the athleticism needed to stick. He can do that with impressive running numbers.


Olsen’s invitation to the Senior Bowl and inclusion on a few All-American teams shows that he’s held in high regard by evaluators. It’s important that Olsen shows that his listed size and weight are legit this week, and that his strength numbers are up to par for an interior lineman. A good combine and Olsen could find a team targeting him for his versatility as high as the fourth or fifth round. It also wouldn’t be that surprising to see him slide down into the bottom of the draft or be signed as a preferred free agent. The game film that scouts watch on Olsen will be important, and Olsen’s relative inexperience, his leadership role with the Irish, and the fact that he’s only 21-years-old, make him an intriguing developmental project for an NFL team.


I’m admittedly biased with Golden Tate, but I think he’ll impress teams during the private interviews as well as with his explosiveness during running drills. Tate is anywhere from the first receiver to the fourth receiver on experts’ draft boards, but his ability to produce from multiple positions, as well as his relative inexperience at the position, make him a guy that I expect will come off the board at the end of round one. For Tate to make that decision easier on teams, he’d help his cause by running a forty in the 4.4s. It helps to have players like Jeremy Maclin and Percy Harvin, two wideouts that slid to the bottom half of round one put together very nice rookie campaigns, even without the 6-foot-5 height that many associate with elite receivers. 


You can’t teach a frame like Sam Young’s and the fact that he started every game he played in a Notre Dame uniform has to be appealing to NFL teams. The Chicago Tribune thinks the Bears might target Young in the third round, giving him a chance to start right away opposite Chris Williams. NFL evaluators already got a look at Young at the Senior Bowl, where he didn’t overwhelm anyone, and it’ll be up to him to put together a strong performance to prove he has the athleticism to play on the edge of an offensive line. Young is another guy that could go just about anywhere in this draft. While he may not be the first-round pick many thought he’d be, he’s got the chance to become a solid pro after he hits an NFL weight room and development program. 

Stepping up… The Secondary


If you missed our first two installments of “Stepping Up,” where we talked about the offensive line and the wide receivers, be sure to check them out.

It wasn’t hard to identify the secondary as a massive problem area last season. A perceived area of strength going into the season, the Irish defensive backs were a massive disappointment, failing to make many big plays, and far too often getting beat for one instead. The veteran cornerbacks that many had high hopes for disappointed almost to a man, as veterans like Rasheon McNeil, Darrin Walls, Gary Gray, and Robert Blanton all had major lapses in coverage, and played well below expectations last season. Meanwhile, the transition of Harrison Smith back to safety was a disaster, and the combination of run-support heavy Kyle McCarthy and the enigmatic play of Sergio Brown left the Irish defense without a capable centerfielder, something that spells disaster for a team trying to play a Cover 2 scheme.

The returning secondary is truly a mixed bag. On the edges, the Irish only lose Rasheon McNeil from the cornerback rotation, returning Walls, Blanton, and Gray, the three corners that played the most minutes in the defensive backfield. At safety, the Irish lose their top two contributors in McCarthy and Brown, in addition to backup Ray Herring, though they do get Harrison Smith back after a lost season spent transitioning between safety and outside linebacker.

While poor pass defense can hardly be blamed solely on defensive backs, corners and safeties are the last line of defense and will always be the ones on the hook when a pass play goes for big yardage. Regardless of the ineptitude of the pass rush, there was still no excuse for a secondary that gave up way too many explosive plays and made a habit of giving up career days to opposing quarterbacks. 

While new defensive coordinator Bob Diaco and new defensive backs coach Chuck Martin have their hands full, they’ve got a group of players that come with a lot of talent. Every cornerback on the roster was a well-regarded recruiting prospect, and they’ve all got plenty of experience to lean on. And while Harrison Smith’s maligned minutes are the only ones that truly return at safety, a clean slate might be the best thing for everyone involved.

The Irish not only have to replace minutes, they need to replace the bad memories of a defensive season gone awry. Here are the key losses, important returning players, and the defensive backs that need to step it up.


If there was a highlight for the Irish secondary, it was Kyle McCarthy. McCarthy was the epitome of a program player, a guy that paid his dues on the way up and played two stand-out seasons as a starter. While I wasn’t as high on his tackling prowess as my colleagues in the broadcast booth, McCarthy’s obscene two-season stat-line made him the only Notre Dame defensive back to eclipse 100 tackles in a season, and he achieved that feat twice. McCarthy also chipped in a team-high five interceptions.


The time is now for cornerback Darrin Walls. There is no more waiting for the former blue-chip cornerback. He’s back for a fifth-year at Notre Dame and hopefully will blossom under the regime change. Robert Blanton also returns, likely humbled from a sophomore season that had to be disappointing after such a strong freshman campaign. Gary Gray will likely be fighting for a starting job as well after wrestling one away during the second half of last season. Gray made a few big plays, but Irish fans hope he’ll bring a new confidence to the field as a senior. At safety, Brian Kelly already mentioned that Harrison Smith has been impressive during offseason workouts and will return to safety after being flip-flopped around the past two seasons.


While every position is a clean slate for the Irish, no group needed it more than the secondary. Last year, the problems seemed to be between the ears more so than athletically. The secondary never seemed to master the new principles of the blitzing Cover 2 scheme that Jon Tenuta employed, and too often the defense was just plain beat on coverage that was fundamentally puzzling. For the Irish defense to play up to their skill level, here are a few guys that’ll need to play big:

Harrison Smith: Nobody needed a regime change like Smith did. The Tennessee native had a rocky season that saw him become the ire of many Irish fans, but enters the season with two years of eligibility remaining. Moving Smith from undersized linebacker to safety expected to play deep coverage is a lot to ask of a young player, especially one that likely relied on a lot of gambling to compete against players that sometimes outweighed him by 100 pounds.

Jamoris Slaughter: Slaughter is the type of guy better classified as a football player than either a cornerback or safety. Slaughter was given a shot late in the year to win a job in the secondary after others played their way out of contention, but he never truly seized the moment. That said, the previous coaching staff believed he was a sound tackler with good speed and ball skills, and has to think that a job in either nickel or as a starting safety is a very real possibility.

Zeke Motta: Motta is a guy that made an immediate impact on special teams. He’s also a jumbo-sized safety that has great football instincts and his eyes on a starting safety position. While I’ve got no idea if Motta can be a guy that plays great in space, if his play on special teams is any indication, he’ll be flying around the field looking to make tackles if he’s given his chance.

Dark Horses: Expect another McCarthy to start working his way onto the field, as Danny is reportedly the better athletes of the two brothers. Fifth-year senior Leonard Gordon should contribute as a safety or corner (Thanks, Zach.). From a physical standpoint, early enrollee Chris Badger looks ready to go on special teams at the very least. E.J. Banks redshirted last year, but might be ready to take a shot at a job in the secondary as well.