Tag: Michael Floyd


Weekend notes: Assistants, Sharks, Rees talk (and more!)


With breaking news and information at a minimum with the Irish a little more than a week out before training camp, it’s been a while since we took a stroll through the links and kept you guys updated on things I found interesting. (Take that for what it’s worth…)

One great thing about the past week has been the slew of media days for college football and the opening of NFL training camps. Turning on your favorite sports channel has never been better with football taking center stage and the dog days of baseball season getting temporarily put on the back burner.

Taking a quick run through the NFL, let’s check in on a few former Irish players now playing on Sundays.

* Manti Te’o now has the most popular rookie jersey in the NFL, seemingly a good sign that Chargers fans are more interested in putting Catfishing behind them and the team’s linebacking crew in front of them.

In Te’o’s case, he’s been a model rookie teammate, as just about everyone that followed Te’o for the past four years would expect. He’s taken to teammate and fellow inside linebacker Donald Butler, a former Washington Husky, and the duo could form one of the best, young combos in the NFL.

All-pro teammate Eric Weddle had this to say about Te’o’s early days with the Chargers.

“He’s eager to learn, extremely talented, instincts are off the charts, obviously, that’s why we brought him in,” Weddle told the AP. “Reminds me of myself in a lot of ways, in the way he recognizes plays and is in the right spot. Biggest thing for him is just consistency, continuing to learn, take what the coaches tell him, along with us as players, give him little tidbits as we see, and just take it, embrace it, have fun with it.”

* Meanwhile, Te’o’s best buddy Robby Toma signed a free agent contract with the Arizona Cardinals and will fight for a roster spot as a slot receiver in a depth chart that includes former Irish star Michael Floyd.

After a quiet rookie season, Floyd looks like a candidate to breakout in his second season in the NFL. Bucky Brooks of NFL.com points to Floyd as one of the most improved players for 2013 in Bruce Arians’ new offensive system.

For Floyd, the shift to a vertical passing game will accentuate his strengths as a big-bodied receiver with strong hands. He excels at shielding defenders away from the ball and high-pointing passes in traffic. Given those traits, Palmer should throw plenty of passes in Floyd’s direction to take advantage of his huge catch radius. The video clip to your right, from Floyd’s brilliant Week 17 outing against the San Francisco 49ers (eight catches for 166 yards and a touchdown), illustrates how the receiver uses his size and strength to come down with 50-50 balls.

* Last update is on former Irish center John Sullivan, who has quietly become one of the top centers in the NFL. After a harrowing senior season in South Bend saw Sullivan struggle with shotgun snaps as he teamed with one of the least experienced offensive lines in recent memory, Sullivan took over for Matt Birk as the Vikings center and is now viewed by many as the top center in the game.

Grantland’s Robert Mays did a nice job writing up Sullivan for Grantland’s All-22 All-Star team and got this quote from Vikings offensive line coach Jeff Davidson, echoing the sentiments of the staff that had Sullivan during his Notre Dame days.

“He’s really smart, I’m talking exceptionally smart,” Davidson told Grantland. “By the time we get to Sundays, he knows what all 11 guys are doing on every play. I don’t think there are many guys you can say that about, except the quarterback. I think that’s what truly sets him apart.”

Now, on to some stories about the current Irish roster:


While Irish fans still wait for an official announcement of a contract extension for head coach Brian Kelly, Blue & Gold Illustrated continues to release tidbits from a sit down with athletic director Jack Swarbrick.

And while Swarbrick continues to stress that a Kelly contract will get done sooner than later, it does appear that the Irish assistant coaches got a much deserved bump in their contracts as well as some other perks that kept the coaching staff in tact.

This from BGI’s conversation with Swarbrick:

One common complaint among former head coaches at Notre Dame is that they didn’t have the money to hang on to high quality assistants. Despite interest from several other teams, the Irish were able to keep its full 10-man staff intact this offseason. Swarbrick said that was an important focus for him and Kelly.

To get there Swarbrick said he loosened the purse strings to stay competitive with other top tier programs. He also said the assistants have more opportunities to add responsibilities and prepare for a future head coaching career than they have in the past.

“Certainly you have to respond to the market, and that’s an element of it, but it’s broader than that,” he said. “It’s about the level of engagement and responsibility you give them. Reinforcing the message that you are prepared to do whatever you can to help them achieve career objectives. Those are all pieces of it.”


With the Irish football team in South Bend for much of the summer attending summer school, senior TJ Jones managed to sneak out for a few days and prepare for life after football. For Jones, that meant swimming with sharks. Literally.

While some have talked about Jones and a future in TV, film or radio (another form of swimming with sharks), Jones took a trip to Tampa and the Florida Aquarium for a chance to shadow a group of marine biologists and get a closer look at what a career like that would be like.

FIDM had video on their Watch ND channel:



Lastly, our friend the Subway Domer has a few good interview transcripts up on his website from Steve Herring and his TNNDN podcast. Herring caught up with former Irish quarterbacks Evan Sharpley and Matt Mulvey about what to expect from Tommy Rees‘ senior season.

You can hear the interviews or read them here (Mulvey) and here (Sharpley), but I’ve clipped two excerpts that I found interesting.

First from Mulvey, who spent time as Everett Golson’s road roommate during his final season on the roster, and had this to say about Golson’s future with the Irish:

“He’s a warrior, he’s gonna battle and do whatever it takes to come back,” Mulvey told Herring. “I do believe he’s going to come back and finish his eligibility at Notre Dame. They’re not gonna hand him the starting role … he’s going to pick up where he was advancing from this spring, retake over this offense and make great strides.”

And this on the offensive game plan with Rees at the helm.

“Chuck Martin will have to show his versatility. With Tommy (before) we saw a lot of formations, motions, and actions in the backfield that gives 1-on-1 advantages that Tommy is so good at reading … I think they’ll be more precise plays and clear guys we want to go to with a favorable matchup … I think Chuck’s mind and creativity with formations will be key in where we put guys like George Atkinson and other skill positions on the field.”

Now, from Sharpley’s comments:

“You’ve seen him come in last year in key situations – and being a former quarterback I know when he’s changing a play based on the look he’s getting – that he helps the receivers and backs … you need to trust a guy like Tommy is gonna put you in the best situation.

“I really feel that with a guy like Tommy at the helm he’s gonna put you in the best play possible to have a winning opportunity.”



Weekend notes: Swarbrick, Watch Lists, Life after Floyd, and more


You can’t blame Jack Swarbrick for taking a vacation. With his work helping to put together a college football playoff done, Swarbrick and his family took a much needed vacation. But that didn’t stop word getting out that Notre Dame was in discussions with the ACC about in-roads to the Orange Bowl.

Earlier in the week, Notre Dame’s John Heisler confirmed discussions.

“Since the development of the new plan for post-season football, the ACC and Notre Dame have had discussions relating to the Orange Bowl,” Heisler said. “While presidents have been consulted, the discussions have been between ACC conference staff and Jack.”

With the bowl system obviously in the midst of a shake-up after the playoff is instituted during the 2014 season, Notre Dame is deadset on correcting a situation that has the Irish awfully scarce on bowl opportunities outside of the BCS.

Yet reports that Notre Dame has set out to commandeer the bowl game as partners with the ACC might be a little far fetched, as Jack Swarbrick acknowledged earlier this week, during an interview with local NBC affiliate WNDU.

“I think there’s been a little bit of misunderstanding with all of that,” Swarbrick told Jeff Jeffers. “It’s been portrayed as a Notre Dame discussion or somebody else’s discussion but it’s much more a collective effort to structure something that has a solution for the other side of the Orange Bowl. “So a lot of us are engaged in that,” Swarbrick continued. “It isn’t limited to Notre Dame. We’re making progress but there’s more work to be done.”

Regardless, it’s a proactive step in the right direction for Notre Dame, who already used their exemption into the Champs Sports Bowl and have limited bowl options right now for years they don’t qualify for the BCS.


It’s that time of year again. Watch List time, where dozens of good players are included on a list trying to anticipate postseason awards. It’s a bit silly, but certainly a nice honor for some of the better football players in the country.

Let’s run the list of Irish players getting mentioned:

Manti Te’o – Lott Trophy, Bednarik Award, Nagurski Award,
Braxston Cave – Rimington Trophy, Outland Trophy,
Tyler Eifert – Mackey Award, Maxwell Award
Zack Martin – Outland Trophy,
Kapron Lewis-Moore – Nagurski Award,
Cierre Wood – Maxwell Award

The list for the Lombardi, Butkus, Biletnikoff, Davey O’Brien, Doak Walker, and Walter Camp awards have yet to be released, but this should get you up to speed.

It’s worth noting that Eifert is the only tight end on the list for the Maxwell Award.


As the Irish offense tries to figure out how to live life after Michael Floyd, Blue & Gold’s Lou Somogyi did a great job pointing out that the Irish have a pretty good track record of rebounding after losing a key offensive player.

Here’s Lou’s top three examples over the past 25 years:

1. How Now Without Brown?
Senior Tim Brown won the Heisman Trophy during an 8-4 season and was the No. 6 pick in the NFL Draft.
1988: Although no one on the 1988 team caught more than 16 passes, the Irish improved to 12-0 to win the national title.

2. Backfield In Motion
1992 :
The star-studded backfield for the 10-1-1 team featured No. 2 NFL pick Rick Mirer at quarterback, 5th-place Heisman finisher Reggie Brooks at tailback, and junior fullback Jerome “The Bus” Bettis went pro early as the No. 10 pick.
1993: The unheralded trio of quarterback Kevin McDougal, tailback Lee Becton and fullback Ray Zellars emerged superbly while the Irish finished 11-1 and No. 2.

3. Action Even Without Jackson
QB Jarious Jackson broke Joe Theismann’s 29-year school record for most passing yards in a season (2,753) and was the second leading rusher with 464 yards. Alas, the Irish also committed 30 turnovers and finished 5-7.
2000: When freshman QB Matt LoVecchio was thrown into the fire, Notre Dame averaged 74 yards less per game than with Jackson — but it committed an NCAA record low eight turnovers to finish 9-2 and earn a BCS bid. The efficiency, resourcefulness and team play of 2000 is a good template for the 2012 Irish to follow after the 2011 unit averaged 413 yards per game (similar to 1999) but committed 29 turnovers (similar to 1999).

The days are likely over of a team winning a national championship with no receiver catching more than 16 balls, but an optimist could make a good argument that losing Floyd will help keep the Irish offensive attack more balanced.

Notre Dame will still have its instant mismatch, with Tyler Eifert moving all around the field. But the Irish’s reliance on Floyd last season might have handicapped a quick strike, vertically driven offense Irish fans have been expecting to see since Brian Kelly came from Cincinnati.


A few final tidbits on recent Irish commitment Justin Brent, who is set to sign in the ’14 class. We’ll find out how good Brent is during his junior season, a breakthrough year for most high school players.

Even if we don’t know just how high Brent’s ceiling is yet, a year ago football was almost an afterthought for the Indianapolis athlete. Focused on his basketball career, Brent almost gave up on football completely, with the 6-foot-3 point guard drawing interesting from heavyweights like Indiana, Purdue, Georgetown, Marquette, and others.

“I’ve been playing basketball my whole life and I’ve also played football my whole life, but I think basketball is where it’s at,” Brent told InsideTheHall.com last July. “With football, I was contemplating not even playing this year, but I guess a lot of coaches like an athlete that play two sports and plus I just like it a lot to play. But I was always nervous about the fact that I could receive an injury. But I’m going to stay with it. College wise, I’ve gotten one letter from Texas A & M and it was just a questionnaire, but that’s the only thing I’ve gotten for football. I don’t think I see myself playing football in college, I think it’s basketball.”

Good thing for all involved that Brent decided to stick with football during his sophomore season. The athleticism that had college basketball coaches taking notice will undoubtedly help Brent on the gridiron.





Weekend notes: Floyd, Smith, Rankings, and more

Jaylon Smith

With finals ending this week at Notre Dame, and graduating approaching next weekend, it’s a slow time for college football news. As we march through the offseason desert with no oasis in sight, let’s dig into some of the more interesting stories I stumbled across this week.


Michael Floyd is one of those seniors graduating next weekend, culminating a wonderful four years in South Bend that included graduating from Notre Dame in 3.5 years and getting drafted in the first round of the NFL Draft. While most of Charlie Weis’ recruits didn’t live up to the hype they arrived with, Floyd was certainly everything anyone could ask for and a great success story.

Christian McCollum of IrishSportsDaily.com did a great job catching up with someone very important in Floyd’s life, St. Paul trainer Ted Johnson. A fellow Cretin-Derham Hall graduate and a former standout running back for the Raiders (if my memory serves me correct he played alongside Heisman Trophy winner Chris Weinke in the 1988 Prep Bowl), Johnson now trains Twin Cities athletes, with Floyd being the standard bearer.

Johnson was invited by Floyd to be with him at Radio City Music Hall, and shared his experiences with McCollum in a great trip down memory lane.

Make no mistake, Ted Johnson was honored to be invited to join Michael Floyd at last month’s NFL Draft, especially after hearing what the former Notre Dame star had to say just after being selected 13th overall by the Arizona Cardinals.

“He gave me a big hug,” says Johnson, who has trained Floyd in his hometown of St. Paul, Minn., dating back to the end of Floyd’s high school days.

“He said, ‘You were the one. You planted that seed and you let me know that was real. I just want to thank you for it and I love you.’ I didn’t even know what to say.”

Floyd has leaned heavily on his mentors from Cretin-Derham Hall, still staying in constant communication with former coaches Mal Scanlon and Andy Bischoff, who both counseled Michael through the difficult decision of coming back for his senior season, as well as bouncing back after his DUI arrest.

Johnson also spoke to ISD about class of 2013 recruit James Onwualu, who is another CDH athlete that works with Johnson. Working together since Onwualu was 13 years old, Johnson labels the future Irish wide receiver a “super freak,” focusing on his explosiveness after Onwualu jumped out of a pool 80 straight times.

“I’ve scoured YouTube, vimeo, UStream to see guys jump out of pools at greater than 3.3 or 3.6 feet,” Johnson told ISD. “We’ve actually moved him to four feet. Now that’s the new benchmark. I couldn’t find anybody in the world anywhere on the internet who’s exploding out of four feet of water and landing on the edge of the pool. I couldn’t find it. We’re trying to do something that’s never been done.”

If you’re into pool jumping football players, you’re going to love Onwualu.


Speaking of freak athletes, Steve Wiltfong of 247Sports.com is reporting that five-star outside linebacker Jaylon Smith will be visiting South Bend this weekend, meeting with Irish coaches for the third time this spring.

There’s no more important recruit in this class than Smith, and the Irish are in a great spot with him. After dazzling recruiting websites with his work as both a pass-rushing outside linebacker and even as a lockdown cover corner, the 6-foot-3, 220-pound Smith will likely walk onto campus and be one of the most dynamic athletes at whatever program he chooses.

There were rumors of Smith being ready to pledge his commitment to the Irish as far back as the Blue-Gold game. Regardless of when he does it, the Irish are in good shape will stay on Smith until Signing Day, as they’ll be in a battle with college football’s biggest programs (including Urban Meyer at Ohio State) for Smith’s signature.

If the Irish do win out here, it’ll be interesting to note that Brian Kelly will have out-dueled Meyer for two players who have brothers already on the Ohio State staff. Count that as a perception vs. reality issue that opponents of Meyer would be wise to mention to prospective recruits. It’s never a good sign when it seems like the only players who turn down Meyer are the ones who have a family member that’s actually played for him.


Athlon Sports is rolling out their preseason Top 25 for 2012 and they’ve got Notre Dame ranked at No. 20, a number that’s raised more than a few eyebrows.

Here’s their rationale:

If Kelly can get his quarterback situation settled, the Irish have enough talent to match their victory total from the last two seasons, even against a schedule that includes three 11-win opponents (Michigan, Stanford and Michigan State) and a pair of 10-win squads (USC and Oklahoma).

Although this isn’t necessarily a crossroads season for Kelly since Notre Dame seems committed to his renovation project, the 2012 campaign will go a long way toward determining how good the Irish can be in 2013-14. There are too many holes/question marks to look at this season as anything but a transitional year under Kelly. Find a consistent quarterback and show improvement, and regardless of the record, Kelly should approach a combined 20 victories in 2013-14. Fall flat and continue to struggle protecting the football and the regime could be in jeopardy.

That first paragraph is filled with minefields that could destroy any encouraging predictions. You certainly can’t gloss over the unsettled quarterbacking situation. Even more difficult to ignore is a schedule that has a whopping five teams that won ten games or more. (And that doesn’t account for opponents like Miami or Pitt, programs that should give the Irish all they can handle.)

You can quickly dismiss Athlon’s ranking by assuming they just included Notre Dame to sell some magazines. But they point out some of the nice assets this football team has, and a final ranking in the Top 20 would be something most Irish fans would sign up for sight unseen I’m guessing.


Lastly, Notre Dame graduate (and friend of the blog) Jamie Reidy has a new book out that’s worth a look. Reidy’s first book, Hard Sell: The Evolution of a Viagra Salesman, inspired Ed Zwick’s movie “Love and Other Drugs” with Anne Hathaway and Jake Gyllenhaal (no big deal, Jake played Jamie).  His most recent effort is A Walk’s As Good As a Hit: Advice/Threats from My Old Man.

It’s a series of essays that tackle father/son relationships, and I’ve enjoyed reading through it this week. If you’re technically savvy, you can buy the eBook here. If you want a hard copy for Father’s Day, buy a paperback copy here.

Michael Floyd selected 13th overall by the Arizona Cardinals

Michael Floyd 3

There won’t be a familiar Notre Dame slide down any draft boards this year. Former Irish wide receiver Michael Floyd was selected 13th overall by the Arizona Cardinals, the second wide receiver taken in the NFL Draft. After deciding to come back to school for his senior season, Floyd was rewarded by the Cardinals and teams with fellow Minnesotan Larry Fitzgerald to bolster an Arizona receiving corps in need of a complimentary weapon.

Floyd is the highest-drafted Notre Dame player since Bryant Young went with the seventh-pick in the 1994 draft. He’s the highest drafted Irish wide receiver since Heisman Trophy winner Tim Brown went sixth in 1988.

“I could not be happier for Michael and his family,” Notre Dame head coach Brian Kelly said. “I’ve said many times I have never coached a person as talented as Michael, and his selection tonight shows that. Michael’s work ethic and passion for football are unparalleled and fans of the Cardinals will love the productivity he’ll bring to Arizona’s offense.”

Floyd closes the book on his Irish career as the most prolific in Notre Dame history. He holds five career receiving records, numbers that could have been even bigger if he didn’t miss multiple games during his freshman and sophomore campaigns. Shaking the injury bug during his junior and senior season, Floyd played in a system that saw the Irish target Floyd downfield far less often.

While the system change depressed his statistics, it also likely helped turn Floyd into an undeniable first-round talent. Forced to play a more well-rounded game during his final two seasons and without an elite quarterback that could get the ball effectively downfield to him, Floyd became one of the best blocking wide receivers in the college game, and became a tremendous possession receiver to complement the downfield ability he showed during his first two seasons.

Floyd surprised many with his 4.42 forty-yard dash at the NFL Scouting Combine. He also impressed multiple teams in interviews leading up to the draft, an important step after a DUI arrest last spring put his football career in jeopardy. But after sitting out a semester after an indefinite suspension from football by Kelly, Floyd was reinstated for his senior season and turned his life around while the spotlight was on him. The Cardinals repaid that hard work by investing their only pick in the first two rounds on the wide receiver, who was hoping to end up across from Fitzgerald, one of his boyhood heroes.

“When I got the call with the 602 number coming in, I wanted to jump for joy, but I played it cool,” Floyd said after during a conference call with reporters. “I talked to Larry and I know he wanted me there, but you never know. I’m just excited that I get the chance to be an Arizona Cardinal.”


Michael Floyd: Sport Science Freak

Floyd Pro Day

After Skylar Diggins got a tour of the ESPN Sport Science lab, there were plenty of people convinced she was more than just a pretty face… and an All-American, Player of the Year candidate. Now former Irish wide receiver Michael Floyd got his chance to impress in the laboratory.

Here’s a quick segment on Floyd courtesy of Sport Science, and a nice reminder that whatever Floyd did on the field wasn’t a product of scheme or lack of other offensive options, but merely because he’s a freak athlete. Between clocking a sub-4.5 forty time at the combine and showing leaping skills that are favorable to athletes like Derrick Rose and Plaxico Burress, it’s a bittersweet reminder that Notre Dame has to replace one of the best offensive weapons in the country.