Tag: Mike Golic

Brian Kelly podium

And so it begins: BK talks 2012 season


Brian Kelly doesn’t officially kick off the 2012 football season until tomorrow, when his opening press conference takes place before the start of training camp. But that didn’t stop talk of the quarterbacking race from starting early.

Joining WSBT’s Sportsbeat with Darin Pritchett and Eric Hansen, Kelly answered questions from fans all across the country for 45 minutes, giving the first look at what’s to come in the upcoming season. Talking about everything from his successful recovery from back surgery to changes to the natural grass surface in Notre Dame Stadium, Kelly was in midseason form on the talk circuit, with the quarterbacking race taking center stage.

“We all know that we’re going to be starting a young man that hasn’t started a game at that position,” Kelly said about heading to Ireland without suspended quarterback Tommy Rees. “We won’t be lacking plays. We just need to execute them well.”

Another major offseason storyline was officially put to rest when Hansen asked Kelly about Tee Shepard. The one-time early enrollee cornerback, who was likely going to play a huge part in the Irish secondary this fall, left Notre Dame before he ever had a chance to practice with the Irish, doing so beneath the fog of rumors concerning a heart problem, suspicions of academic inadequacies, and a lot of Notre Dame fans scratching their head after two of Fresno’s most talented players in years, both long committed to Notre Dame, will apparently never play football for the Fighting Irish.

While answers are still hard to come by, Kelly was overly complimentary about Shepard, but also closed the door on any return to the Irish, a rumor that was largely fueled by Shepard himself via Twitter this summer.

“That door has now closed and we have invested those assets in other positions,” Kelly said. “That ship has sailed.”

One ship that hasn’t sailed is the playing surface inside Notre Dame Stadium. When asked about the future of natural grass, Kelly was cut and dry not only about his preference for field turf, but also spoke pointedly that the artificial surface was making its way inside the house that Rockne built.

“Field turf is coming,” Kelly said.

Kelly also spoke highly of the offseason work done by veterans like TJ Jones, Theo Riddick and Zeke Motta, and a freshman class that came into camp in better shape than anyone expected. He talked up local talent Daniel Smith, who had another summer surgery to get him healthy, a never-ending theme for the physically gifted wideout.

The battle along the offensive line seems to be focused on right guard. With Christian Lombard seemingly owning the right tackle slot, it’ll be fifth-year grad Mike Golic battling Nick Martin for a starting role and Tate Nichols likely relegated to backing up Lombard. The unit will look to get more consistency and better with its technique under new offensive line coach Harry Hiestand.

“We wanted somebody who could get to the point where technique was number one,” Kelly said of Hiestand. “Ed Warinner did a very good job for us, but I was look for something a little bit different this time around. We wanted to focus on the fundamentals.”

Speaking of the fundamentals, nowhere will that come into play more than at quarterback. After spending the spring focusing on taking control of the offense and holding onto the football.

“Take great care of the football,” Kelly said, pointing to the key criteria in the quarterbacking battle. “The quarterback that’s going to play against Navy is the one we trust most to take care of the football.”

Kelly perhaps revealed his hand a bit when asked the million dollar question that’ll likely shape preseason camp. When asked if he had an idea of who that quarterback would be, Kelly didn’t hesitate.

“I do. I’ve got an idea in my mind,” Kelly said. “But we now have to take that from  meeting room talk and go apply that. One’s not good enough. We’ve got to get a couple guys ready for Navy and for the season. We’ve got a couple ideas, but it’ll take some time.”


Fifth year candidates begin to emerge

Dan McCarty

News broke earlier in the week that walk-on special teams ace Chris Salvi was being rewarded with a scholarship. Now Eric Hansen of the South Bend Tribune has the list of fifth-year candidates that will go before the Faculty Board on Athletics for approval to return for next season.

Hansen reports that six seniors are in the final process of returning for next season: center Braxston Cave, center Mike Golic Jr., wide receiver John Goodman, defensive end Kapron Lewis-Moore, safety Dan McCarthy, and safety Jamoris Slaughter.

Cave, Lewis-Moore and Slaughter all spent significant time in the starting lineup last season, and their return was all but assumed. Sean Cwynar, who shared starting duties at nose guard with Louis Nix, had already decided not to return for a fifth season, though he would’ve likely been welcomed back. Goodman and Golic had also long been rumored to be returning, with Goodman providing senior depth at wide receiver while Golic has the opportunity to play the super-sub role Andrew Nuss filed last year as a graduate student.

Perhaps the biggest surprise is the return of McCarthy. In mid-November, it appeared that McCarthy was preparing himself for life after football, with the finance major ready to tackle the job market in his senior profile by the university’s school newspaper The Observer. But with the Irish recruiting class coming up short on a few targets, McCarthy will add veteran depth in the secondary, a position grouping that’s losing three of four starters and needs to replace captain Harrison Smith.

It’s been mentioned before and bears mentioning again that McCarthy’s older brother Kyle, now with the Kansas City Chiefs, was a near anonymous special teams player until his senior season, when he ascended into a starting role and then captained the squad during his fifth year. With new safeties coach Bobby Elliott getting his first look at the depth chart, there’s a chance McCarthy could battle for the nickel job and capitalize on the athleticism that made him the high school player of the year in Ohio his senior season.

Here’s a look at the projected 2012 Irish scholarship roster, broken down by class:

Graduate Students (7)

Braxston Cave
Mike Golic Jr.
John Goodman
Kapron Lewis-Moore
Dan McCarthy
Chris Salvi
Jamoris Slaughter

Seniors (15)

Carlo Calabrese
Jordan Cowart
Tyler Eifert
Dan Fox
Jake Golic
Zack Martin
Zeke Motta
Theo Riddick
Tyler Stockton
Nick Tausch
Manti Te’o
Robby Toma
Ben Turk
Chris Watt
Cierre Wood

Juniors (19)

Austin Collinsworth
Bruce Heggie
Andrew Hendrix
Bennett Jackson
TJ Jones
Christian Lombard
Luke Massa
Kendall Moore
Tate Nichols
Louis Nix III
Tommy Rees
Cameron Roberson
Kona Schwenke
Prince Shembo
Daniel Smith
Danny Spond
Justin Utupo
Alex Welch
Lo Wood

Sophomores (26)

George Atkinson III
Josh Atkinson
Chris Badger
Kyle Brindza
Jalen Brown
Amir Carlisle
Brad Carrico
Ben Councell
DaVaris Daniels
Matthias Farley
Everett Golson
Jarrett Grace
Conor Hanratty
Eilar Hardy
Matt Hegarty
Chase Hounshell
Ben Koyack
Aaron Lynch
Nick Martin
Cam McDaniel
Troy Niklas
Jordan Prestwood
Anthony Rabasa
Tony Springmann
Stephon Tuitt
Ishaq Williams

Freshman (17)

Nick Baratti
Chris Brown
Scott Daly
Sheldon Day
Justin Ferguson
Mark Harrell
Jarron Jones
Gunner Kiel
William Mahone
Davonte Neal
Romeo Okwara
CJ Prosise
KeiVarae Russell
Tee Shepard
Elijah Shumate
Ronnie Stanley
John Turner

Offensive line play key to victory


There are more than a few Irish fans with sweat beads collecting as they think about reserve center Mike Golic, battling a physically impressive set of Seminole defensive tackles, led by true freshman Timmy Jernigan. Subbing in for injured senior Braxston Cave, Golic has held his own at the point of attack, but the offensive line — once the strength of the offense — saw its play slip in the closing month of the season, and the unit was overwhelmed for much of the first half against Stanford, when the Cardinal front seven shut down the Irish offense. But if a veteran like Golic, a fourth year player battling a talented freshman has you worried, you haven’t taken a look at what the Seminoles are running out there.

Put quite simply, it’s been one of those years for the Seminoles, who have been decimated by injuries on the offensive line. While Cave’s injury has been the only setback for Ed Warinner‘s troops, Florida State might be started four freshman along the front line, a challenge for any offense, even if Jimbo Fisher and the Seminoles coaching staff has had a month to work with the youngers.

“I’ve never been through injuries like we’ve been through this year,” Fisher said. “But in the end, it gave a lot of young guys time to develop and play. Hopefully we’ll play well in the game.”

Senior Zebrie Sanders will man the left tackle position, finishing an All-ACC career with a successful transition to the blind side after starting much of his first three seasons at right tackle. After that, it’ll be a youth movement for the Seminoles, with freshmen left guard Josue Matias, center Austin Barron, right guard Tre’ Jackson and right tackle Bobby Hart all being thrown into the fire. At this time last year, all four were just wrapping up high school careers. Now they’ll be tasked with blocking Ethan Johnson, Louis Nix, Sean Cwynar, Aaron Lynch, and Stephon Tuitt. It’s a match-up that should skew heavily in the Irish’s favor on paper. But physically, Fisher says the group looks the part.

“They’re doing well. You saw us when we were doing good on good,” Fisher said. “I mean their size. You’re talking about Matias at 325, Tre’ at 325, Barron at 300, Bobby Hart at 310, 315. That size and girth makes a big difference. I’m very pleased with their progress and what they’re doing.”

It’s hard enough to judge offensive line play by watching television broadcasts, but from a recruiting perspective, Hart was the highest profile player of the group, with the St. Thomas Aquinas product rated among the top 100 players in the country. His high school teammate at the Fort Lauderdale powerhouse, Barron is stepping in at center over sophomore starter Bryan Stork, where he’s started two games. Jackson had offers from Alabama and Georgia, while Matias was one of the top players in New Jersey last year with offers from North Carolina, Florida, and Wisconsin.

Even though the Seminoles won six of their last seven games, they never truly got their offense rolling, putting up more than 400 yards only once in that stretch. With the Irish defense one of the stingier units this group has faced this year, it’ll be up to the Seminoles offensive line, green as it may be, to win the battle at the line of scrimmage if Florida State wants to move the ball effectively.

Sure, Irish fans have a right to be worried about how the Irish front five will handle a Seminoles defensive line among the best in the country. But the feeling will likely be mutual.

Five things we learned: Notre Dame 16, Boston College 14

Jonas Gray Michael Floyd

Senior Day will always be bittersweet. But Saturday’s home finale was also cruel, with the Irish’s 16-14 victory over Boston College overshadowed by the loss of senior running back Jonas Gray. Gray — one of the great surprises of the 2011 season, coming from nowhere to becoming the Irish’s most dangerous rusher — was tackled low along the Irish sideline in the second half and suffered what’s believed to be a season-ending knee injury.

“It’s so disappointing that we lost such a great kid,” head coach Brian Kelly said from the field after the game. “The game of football sometimes is cruel.”

On a Saturday where the Irish hoped to win with style, they struggled to win at all, reminded throughout the game that while Boston College may have been 24-point underdogs, they’ll never come to Notre Dame Stadium and simply roll over.

But with fresh memories of Senior Day collapses against UConn and Syracuse, the Irish battled for a victory, their eight in nine games, as Notre Dame continues its undefeated stretch of November football under Kelly after going winless in Charlie Weis’ final two seasons.

“I just like the way our guys understand how to win games in November,” Kelly said.

That confidence certainly wasn’t shared by an anxious stadium that broke out in boos, and an ND faithful that all but sounded the alarm bells as the game drew closer. Those hoping to watch the Irish coast into Palo Alto next weekend on a roll will be afforded no such comfort.

Still, the Irish took home their final game in Notre Dame Stadium, by a margin that was all too close for everyone but the guys on the field and their proud head coach. Let’s find out what else we learned in Saturday’s 16-14 Irish victory.


When they’ll need it most, the Irish likely just lost the power in their power running game.

While he seemed resigned to the fact walking off the field, Brian Kelly wasn’t willing to concede the loss of Jonas Gray for the season. When pressed on Alex Flanagan‘s report that Gray suffered a torn ACL, Kelly said there’s no certainty until the doctors take a closer look.

“I was just in the training room with our doctors. They want to get an MRI and get a good look at that,” Kelly said.

After watching the replay of the tackle, there’s every reason to think that Gray, the heart of the Irish power running game, is lost for the year. The senior, who was joined in an emotional embrace on the field before the game with his coach and then his mother, addressed the team in the locker room after the game.

“He talked to the team after. He’s a great young man,” Kelly said. “It’s emotional when you don’t know if you’re going to be able to play your last game or not. It’s still uncertain until we get more medical information, but there’s a lot of emotions in that locker room.”

Last year, it was Robert Hughes who picked up the slack and provided the punch to the running game in November after Armando Allen went down. Without Gray, the Irish don’t have a physical option at tailback, with freshmen George Atkinson and Cam McDanniel the only scholarship ball cariers behind Cierre Wood.

If this is it for Gray, he’s certainly done the miraculous in his senior season, and regardless of the extent of his knee injury, earned his way into an NFL training camp next year. His 26-yard touchdown run continued an impressive season and the senior became a touchdown machine, averaging a touchdown run every 9.5 carries this season, the third best ratio in the country this season.


Want to keep the Irish offense under wraps? Dominate the field position battle.

It wasn’t as if the Irish offense played terribly, putting up 417 yards of total offense on a windblown day that wreaked havoc all across the college football world on Saturday. But the Irish were constantly buried by the excellence of Boston College senior punter Ryan Quigley, who punted an astonishing nine times on Saturday (a season-high), with six being downed inside the Irish 20.

The Irish started with the ball inside their own 20 six times. On all six series, they punted the football. Combine that with a severe wind that limited the Irish’s ability to throw the ball and you’ve found a decent recipe for keeping points off the borad.

“The field position obviously was difficult to manage,” Kelly said. “The weather elements out there were difficult. It was very blustery. So we had to manage. We knew what kind of game this was going to end up being, and it certainly turned out this way.”

After struggling for the first half of the year, Ben Turk seemed at home in a punting battle, out-dueling Quigley on length as he averaged 44.0 yards a punt on a season-high eight attempts. Of course, the next step in Turk’s evolution will be distance control, as the junior kicked three touchbacks, two on critical pooch punts when the Irish needed a chance to down the football.

Sure, it made for an ugly day to some fans. But Kelly showed he’s willing to win football games by any means necessary.


The Irish defense rose to the occasion.

There was more than a little grumbling when Kelly eschewed a 4th and 1 attempt for a Turk punt early in the fourth quarter. But with the Irish clinging to a six-point lead, Kelly leaned on his defense to help him win the football game.

“What played into it mostly was that our defense was playing really really well and had been playing on a couple of short fields,” Kelly said. “I felt like we owed them the opportunity to play with a better field position situation.”

The defense rewarded the head coach, holding the Eagles to a three-and-out, before Quigley punted the ball back to the Irish. Then the offense rewarded Kelly by putting together their only scoring drive of the second half, a nine-play, 55-yard series that was capped by a clutch David Ruffer field goal. (Lining up on the same hash-mark and just three yards farther away from the critical field goal he missed against USF, Ruffer drilled this one down the middle.)

Boston College’s offense has been anemic all year, but the Irish still held the Eagles to just 250 total yards, limiting the Eagles running game to just 3.2 yards a carry while harassing Chase Rettig all afternoon. On a day when the Irish leaned on the unit to hold strong, they did just that, minus the two touchdown drives they yielded.

“I think two drives, you know, we got into two third down situations that they converted on the first score and the last score.  We got into some dime where they ran the ball and had a couple of plays.  But if you look at it, we kicked the ball out of play, started on the 40, got a 15-yard personal foul penalty, and that put them in a good position.”

Putting Bob Diaco‘s defense in a bad position is certainly nothing new. And with what seems like half the Irish defense in sick bay heading into the game — Stephon Tuitt missed the game from illness, Robert Blanton sat out two days this week with the flu, and Harrison Smith spent last night in the infirmary on an IV — the Irish did what they had to do, hold a struggling Eagles offense when the offense couldn’t get on track.


The Irish offense misses Braxston Cave.

True, the Irish are undefeated since Mike Golic stepped in for his good friend Braxston Cave at center. But if you’re looking for proof that the Irish offense misses their stalwart center, take a look at the Irish’s efficiency at the line of scrimmage since Cave left the lineup.

With Cave anchoring the line, the offense went sackless in the passing game throughout October and limited the negative plays, keeping opposing defenses out of the backfield.

Here’s a quick tally of opponents’ tackles-for-loss (with the score in parenthesis) since October 1st:

Purdue (38-10 — W): 4 TFLs — 7.2 YPC
Air Force (59-33 — W): 5 TFLs — 5.7 YPC
USC (17-31 — L): 1 TFL — 4.6 YPC
Navy (56-14 — W): 2 TFL — 5.2 YPC
Wake Forest (24-17 — W): 2 TFLs — 4.6 YPC
Maryland (45-21 — W): 10 TFLs — 4.6 YPC
Boston College (16-14 — W): 4 TFLs — 4.1 YPC

In the games Golic has taken snaps at center, the Irish have had three of their least efficient running games of the year, while allowing 14 tackles in the backfield, including three sacks against Maryland.

More importantly, the Irish consistently lost first down against the Eagles, a crippling offensive dilemma when you add it to bad field position.

Notre Dame had 34 first downs on the afternoon, running the ball 20 times and throwing it 14. But the tale of the offense’s struggles can be told on their second down opportunities. Only three times did the Irish have a second and short. They had six second and mediums and more troubling, an astonishing 16 second and longs.

Losing first down certainly isn’t on Golic’s head, but the Irish are going to need to get back to the drawing board before the regular season finale against Stanford.


With heavy hearts and emotions everywhere, there’s nothing wrong with a win.

Selective memory doesn’t just plague Notre Dame fans, but it bears mentioning that Notre Dame was a statistically dominant team in their two opening losses this year, and look where that got them. So for all those that spent more time complaining about what the Irish didn’t do on Senior Day than what they actually did do, take a second and enjoy a hard fought victory against one of the school’s most hated rivals.

“Give credit to Boston College now, they played well today,” Kelly said after the game. “Coming in 3-7, this was their bowl game and they played hard.”

There will be plenty of time to bemoan the things that went wrong, but there’s a pleasant evolution to this football team, finding ways to win tight games after only finding ways to lose in the season’s opening two weeks.

On a blustery day, questions arose about Tommy Rees‘ accuracy and decision making, with the sophomore forcing a few throws into coverage and struggling to find open men against an Eagles defense content to drop into coverage. But Kelly would hear none of it, unwilling to critique his quarterback on a difficult day to throw the football.

“We won again,” Kelly responded. “I think he’s 12-2 as a starter. That’s pretty good. I don’t know if you guys know that, 12-2, that’s pretty good as a starter.”

True, Rees missed a wide open Michael Floyd a step long as the senior streaked wide open down the sideline for a sure touchdown. Yet the Irish were able to overcome the emotions of the day, even with players clearly shook up on the sidelines after Gray’s injury, proving a lot about this team’s fortitude.

“Winning is hard in college football. You watch across the landscape there’s only a couple teams undefeated one team, maybe two. It’s hard to win.”

After starting the season 0-2, history wasn’t in the Irish’s corner. Since 1900 the Irish have done it five times, with the 1978 team the only one to rally to a winning record. Now the Irish head into Palo Alto looking to win their ninth game of the regular season, progress by any measure of the word and impressive when you consider the hole the team put itself in.

On a dreary November day with his fan base grumbling after an ugly win, the head coach was rightfully content.

“In November, it’s hard to win unless you’ve got a great mental outlook, and our guys do,” Kelly said. “That’s satisfying as a football coach.”

Braxston Cave lost for the season

Braxston Cave

The details of the injury are still scant, but Brian Kelly announced this morning that starting center Braxston Cave will be lost for the remainder of the season. The injury will push senior Mike Golic into the lineup, the first change in the starting offensive line this year.

“Braxston Cave will be out for the season. He is going to get surgery in the next few days,” Kelly said. “I don’t have the technical information for you other than to tell you that they have to go in there and repair a ligament, so he’ll be lost for the year. It’s a tough loss for us and Braxston has been a consistent performer for us over the past few years. We feel terrible for Braxston and he’s given us everything over the past two years but he will be back, and that’s the good part about it.”

Saturday, Kelly thought Cave had a mid-foot sprain, and sounded upbeat about the overnight healing process. But an MRI likely revealed an injury that took the team’s senior center — who still has a year of eligibility remaining — out and thrust Golic, playing his first significant minutes against Wake Forest, into a unit that’s the strength of the team.

Kelly sounded confident that the Golic would be able to step in and keep the unit playing great football.

“We have a great deal of confidence in Mike Golic,” Kelly said. “Mike came in and played very well for us. I think when you look at the center position there’s always a great concern because that guy is put in a very difficult situation with shotgun snaps and changing up the cadence, calling out some of the defensive fronts and structures, but Mike’s done a nice job and we have a great deal of confidence. It’s a next man in situation for us with Mike going in there.”

Kelly cited Golic’s improvement physically over the last 18 months, with the center making great strides in Paul Longo‘s strength program. He also cited Golic’s comfort working from the shotgun, where his snaps were all crisp and quick back to Tommy Rees on Saturday, the first, but very important, step that goes with playing the position.

Fifth-year grad student Andrew Nuss will slide in at the No. 2 center position, while sophomore Bruce Heggie will move up into the No. 2 slot at left guard behind Chris Watt. That Golic gets the starting nod over Nuss shows you that it isn’t just lip-service being paid by Kelly when he’s complimented the work the senior has done. Similarly, that Heggie now slides into the back-up role at guard likely means he’s done enough to impress the staff with his athleticism and versatility, and also that the coaches don’t want to burn a year of eligibility on players like Conor Hanratty and Nick Martin, two freshman that have impressed this year.

Kelly wasn’t ready to talk about the trio of players dealing with ankle injuries, with Manti Te’o, Aaron Lynch and Ethan Johnson all on the mend. But he did announce that Theo Riddick would miss Saturday’s game with a hamstring injury, another injury setback for the junior wide receiver.