Tag: Navy

ANNAPOLIS, MD - SEPTEMBER 19:  Keenan Reynolds #19 of the Navy Midshipmen rushes for his fifth touchdown in the fourth quarter against the East Carolina Pirates during their 45-21 win on September 19, 2015 in Annapolis, Maryland.  (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)

Evaluating VanGorder’s scheme against the option


Notre Dame’s ability to slow down Georgia Tech’s vaunted option attack served as one of the high points to the Irish’s early season success. After spending a considerable amount of offseason energy towards attacking the option and learning more, watching the Irish hold the Yellow Jackets in check was a huge victory for Brian VanGorder, Bob Elliott and the rest of Notre Dame’s staff.

But it was only half the battle.

This weekend, Keenan Reynolds and Navy’s veteran offense come to town looking to wreak some havoc on a defense that’s struggled to slow it down. And after getting a look at some of the new tricks the Irish had in store for Paul Johnson, Ken Niumatalolo and his offensive coaches have likely started plotting their counterpunches days in advance.

How did Notre Dame’s defense slow down Georgia Tech? Brian Kelly credited an aggressive game plan and continually changing looks. So while some were quick to wonder whether Notre Dame’s scheme changes were the biggest piece of the puzzle, it’s interesting to see how the Irish’s strategic decisions looked from the perspective of an option expert.

Over at “The Birddog” blog, Michael James utilizes his spread option expertise and takes a look at how the Irish defended Georgia Tech. His conclusion:

Did the Irish finally figure out the magic formula that will kill this gimmick high school offense for good?

Not exactly.

The Irish played a fairly standard 4-3 for a large chunk of the game. James thought Notre Dame’s move to a 3-5-3 was unique, though certainly not the first time anybody’s used that alignment.

But what stood out wasn’t necessarily the Xs and Os, but rather how much better Notre Dame’s personnel reacted to what they were facing.

Again, from the Birddog Blog:

The real story here, and what stood out to me when watching Notre Dame play Georgia Tech, was how much faster the Irish played compared to past years. I don’t mean that they are more athletic, although this is considered to be the best Notre Dame team in years. I mean that they reacted far more quickly to what they saw compared to what they’ve done in the past.

Usually, when a team plays a spread option offense, one of the biggest challenges that defensive coordinators talk about is replicating the offense’s speed and precision. It’s common to hear them say that it takes a series or two to adjust. That was most certainly not the case here.

James referenced our Media Day observations and seemed impressed by the decision to bring in walk-on Rob Regan to captain what’s now known as the SWAG team. And while VanGorder’s reputation as a mad scientist had many Irish fans wondering if the veteran coordinator cooked something up that hadn’t been seen, it was more a trait usually associated with Kelly that seems to have made the biggest difference.

“It wasn’t that the game plan was so amazing (although it was admittedly more complex and aggressive than we’ve seen out of other Notre Dame teams),” James wrote. “It was plain ol’ coachin’ ’em up.

“Notre Dame’s players were individually more prepared for what they’d see. Notre Dame is already extremely talented, but talented and prepared? You can’t adjust for that. That’s more challenging for Navy than any game plan.”

Offseason Q&A: Navy

Keenan Reynolds, Joe Nauert, James Kelly

As it does annually, Notre Dame’s game with Navy is a terrifying proposition. While the Irish haven’t lost to Ken Niumatalolo’s team since 2010, the Midshipmen have pushed the Irish to the max—and the Navy hangover is beginning to be a thing.

Last year, the Irish beat Navy by 10, but lost the following week. The year before Notre Dame beat the Midshipmen by a touchdown, but lost the next Saturday to Pitt. “The body blow theory,” coined by Bruce Feldman, is picking up steam, and it’s not just a Notre Dame thing, but rather the collateral damage of playing Navy, a very difficult game that garners little national respect.

Gene Wang of the Washington Post gets us up to speed on the Midshipmen and what Notre Dame fans can expect from their annual battle.


Let’s start here: Even though Notre Dame has won four-straight against Navy, it’s still a game that terrifies Irish fans, and likely the coaching staff as well.

Do most Navy opponents feel this way? Or is this some kind of Notre Dame thing?

Navy scares the heck out of most opponents because the triple option is nearly impossible to prepare for during the course of a season. With the athletes Navy has executing the offense flawlessly, the triple option is almost impossible to stop too. Just ask Urban Meyer, who said as much following a game in which the Midshipmen played Ohio State toe-to-toe in the first half last season.


To stop Navy you need to stop Keenan Reynolds, now a senior and a long, long, long way from the kid who looked a little lost in Ireland to kick off the 2012 season.

We’ve seen some very good Navy option quarterbacks. But is it hyperbole to put Reynolds at the top of this group? What’s the ceiling on his 2015 senior season? Dark-horse Heisman contender?

Keenan Reynolds is without question the best triple option quarterback in Navy history. He holds every meaningful scoring record and could have been a dark-horse Heisman contender last year had he not suffered a series of ailments that were nagging all season. Still, he posted record-setting numbers and is poised to be even better this season assuming he stays healthy, so a dark-horse Heisman run isn’t out of the question.


This seems like an evergreen question. But for as good as the Navy offense should be, what’s the state of Buddy Green’s defense? If Navy’s blueprint for victory needs to include a few stops and a forced turnover, does this group look like one that can make that happen?

With Notre Dame likely bringing a heavy dose of ground game and a veteran offensive line, will Navy’s rebuilt from seven be able to hold up?

There’s frequently turnover along Navy’s front seven, but this year it’s especially pronounced at linebacker with three starters gone, including both outside positions. Buddy Green always seems to find a way to patch together a defense that most often bends but doesn’t break. This year will be another test for certain, and at this point, it doesn’t seem as if Notre Dame would encounter much resistance running the ball.


Notre Dame’s defense imploded after the Navy game, with Joe Schmidt lost for the year with a serious ankle injury and the blocking scheme of the Midshipmen taking a toll on an already beaten up defensive line.

Ask an Irish fan about Navy football and it takes about 10 seconds to hear about the cut blocks. As we watch the sport try everything to make it a safer game, do you see this fundamental component of the triple-option offense ever being eliminated?

Cut blocking is a vital part of triple option because Navy isn’t going to beat teams with size and strength, and it’s not going away anytime soon. The Midshipmen win at the line of scrimmage using leverage, not brute force. I found it interesting last season when Brian Kelly was asked about cut blocking, and his response was basically to stop crying and deal with it. Very well put.


Ken Niumatalolo feels like he’s been at Navy forever. He’s shown some great coaching chops, and has built on the impressive foundation Paul Johnson laid. Is he a lifer at Navy? Do you think there’s a job that could entice him to leave?

Niumatalolo is a Navy lifer simply because there are very few other places where he’d be able to implement the triple option as well as it runs at the academy. He has said repeatedly how much he enjoys living in Annapolis and that once he leaves Navy, he’ll retire to Hawaii. He already is the school’s all-time victories leader and has a blueprint for winning that would be difficult if not impossible to replicate elsewhere. It would be shocking if he accepted a position at another school.


It’s still too soon to know how a team will be next year. But for Irish fans used to seeing Navy each season, can you ballpark the expectations for the 2015 Midshipmen?

The offense has potential to be even more explosive than usual given a healthy Reynolds and what could be a more wide-open passing game. As difficult as it may be to envision, it shouldn’t come as a surprise if Navy tries to stretch the field with more throws to WR Jamir Tillman, who is 6-feet-4, 206 pounds and can separate downfield. The defense remains a question, but the Midshipmen can win shootouts if necessary. Nine wins is a realistic expectation.

Mailbag: Captains, intanglibles and KeiVarae’s return

Malik Zaire, Chris Brown

It’s a weekend edition of the mailbag. Some great questions both in the comments and on Twitter. We’ll keep reopening this throughout the weekend and into next week.

Here goes nothing:


steincj36: Who do you think will be the Captain(s) of the team? Who do you think will be the emotional leader(s) of the team?

You could probably make an argument for a dozen guys being capable captains on this team. And that’s a very good thing. In year’s past, here are some guys I’d tell you would be a lock in just about any other season:

Matthias Farley
Corey Robinson (maybe next year)
Everett Golson
Jarrett Grace
Jaylon Smith (if he returns, for sure next year)
KeiVarae Russell (not sure if suspension will let him)
Tarean Folston 
(maybe next year)
Malik Zaire (a lock for next year)

Ultimately, I think returning captains Nick Martin and Sheldon Day will keep the ‘C’ on their chest. They’re the leaders of their position groups, and certainly didn’t do anything to lose that standing.

So if we’re replacing Austin Collinsworth and Cam McDaniel, you’ll probably do it with veteran players. An obvious one is Joe Schmidt. He’s the team’s returning MVP, a charismatic leader who probably should’ve been a captain last season and a more than worthy choice.

A maybe off the radar choice is Ronnie Stanley. Two captains along the offensive line is pretty rare, but so is this offensive line group. And if there’s ever a time to reward a player for making the decision to return for his senior season, it’s a great precedent to set—especially with Jaylon Smith likely looking at a similar decision next year.

As for emotional leaders, I think KeiVarae Russell was a lock to be a captain at Notre Dame, maybe even last season before his academic suspension. I wouldn’t be surprised if he was named a captain, and even if he isn’t, he’ll be an emotional leader.

On offense, we’ll get to Zaire’s natural leadership skills shortly. But he fits the emotional leader tag perfectly. I also think Jarrett Grace and Max Redfield will take on key leadership roles.


upthera44: 1. How valuable are Zaire’s intangibles (leadership, ability to rise to the occasion on game day, etc.)? How much should they be factored into the calculus for picking the starter?

Up until I saw Zaire handle the press after the USC game last year, I’d have called his intangibles (and really, intangibles in general) incredibly overrated. But seeing his charisma firsthand and watching him lift a team that was playing for nothing in the second half with effort, motivation and a true winner’s will, I became a believer.

(Candidly, before that game, I thought there was a better chance that we’d never see Zaire as a starter than him taking over the offense.)

Add to that the heart, effort and willpower he put into the LSU victory—and the genuine emotional outburst that came after the victory—I think his elite leadership abilities are a very real factor that the coaching staff is taking into consideration.

Of course, Zaire can be a leader playing a role on the team, even if it isn’t the starting quarterback. And part of the calculus is certainly figuring out how Zaire can lead while also allowing Golson to play a key role in this offense, a still-being-determined formula that’ll truly come into focus come June, when Golson officially commits to being a part of this football team (if not sooner).

But if Golson transfers, this will very quickly be Zaire’s offense. And the team will certainly rally around a pitch-perfect leader who will have plenty of success.



tampabayirish: It has been announced that San Diego (a great choice) is the likely destination for the 2018 Navy-Notre Dame game. Any word on the location of the 2016 Navy-Notre Dame game?

The report mentioned both the 2016 and 2018 game, and sign me up for either or both. With the Navy’s footprint in the San Diego area and another Southern California game for the Irish (Notre Dame will end the 2016 and 2018 seasons at USC), both schools would have some excitement for that game.

One suggestion: Get it out of that dump Qualcomm Stadium and put it in Petco Park. A Saturday at one of America’s finest venues and in the Gaslamp District would be a great day.


@irishpatient: Russell has a long layoff, assuming he’s back, what do we know about his conditioning and understanding of the new defense?

I take it you aren’t following Russell on Instagram? He’s been posting his workout photos from basically the start of his suspension. So if you’re worried about him being in shape, I’ll give you a greatest hits below.

As for his understanding of the new defense, Russell was already deep into the system last August and spent the spring learning it as well, tutoring roommate Nick Watkins on the finer points, when he was pulled from the team. He’s been in contact with the team and coaching staff. And it even sounds like the plan is for Russell to be a lockdown cornerback on the opponents best receiver, pairing with Cole Luke to be a great starting duo.