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Meyer does his best to flip Kraemer


How do you know a Notre Dame recruit is a good one? Because Urban Meyer wants him.

And while the Irish’s 2016 recruiting class has yet to fully hit its stride, two offensive linemen—blue-chippers Tommy Kraemer and Liam Eichenberg—had offers and major interest from Meyer and hometown program Ohio State, only to choose Notre Dame.

But nobody expects Meyer to quit after a commitment. And it sounds like the Ohio State coaching staff is doubling-down its efforts to flip Kraemer. The good news for Irish fans? It doesn’t sound like Kraemer is budging.

After earning an invitation to The Opening, Cleveland.com caught up with Kraemer, and asked about the Buckeyes’ pursuit.

“Coach (Kerry) Coombs called me last week and was at the school last week,” Kraemer told Cleveland.com. “They have not stopped. Coach Coombs said they aren’t going to stop until I sign, so I’ll take it as it is and focus on Notre Dame.”



Kraemer is a recruit worth chasing. He just earned rave reviews at the Columbus Regional Camp. One of the top prospects in the country, he’s already committed to the U.S. Army All-American game.

247 Sports views him as a 5-star prospect. Rivals views him as the 31st best player in the country. And he’s a key building block for the Irish at tackle, a position that needs restocking this February.

In days past, Meyer served as one of the ultimate thorns in the side of Notre Dame, routinely plucking top players from Charlie Weis’ recruiting classes when he was at Florida. And while Meyer managed to pull away Taylor Decker (who has turned into an excellent tackle for the Buckeyes), Brian Kelly has more than held his own against Ohio State, especially along the offensive line.

And while Ohio State would like to add Kraemer to former Irish assistant Ed Warinner‘s depth chart, Kraemer plans to honor his pledge to Notre Dame, taking pride in his decision.

“I am very happy with Notre Dame and I love it there. I knew when I first visited that was the place for me, and I’ve never looked back since,” Kraemer told Cleveland.com. “I take pride in the fact that one of the top players in Ohio is going to Notre Dame over Ohio State.

“I think it shows that they still have that recruiting tie in Ohio and can keep it going.”



Midwest recruiting scene just got a little more crowded


Way back in June, we took a look at the lay of the land in the Midwest, and noticed how the recruiting world might be shifting a bit. Back then, big news was that Russell Wilson — given his walking papers by North Carolina State coach Tom O’Brien — was signing on the dotted line with Wisconsin. (A story that I was credited for breaking, even though that wasn’t 100 percent my intent to be completely honest.)

Well, with Urban Meyer taking the head coaching job at Ohio State, and all the changes at Penn State, it’s time to take another look back at what’s gone on in less than five months. Let’s just say it’s been substantial.

Let’s check in across the Midwestern powers and see what’s happened since June.


Here’s what I said then:

Where the Buckeyes go is anyone’s guess, but it’ll be with an interim head coach, an athletic director that isn’t likely to survive the rather large magnifying glass that peers over his department, and a flagship program that’s unraveling faster than twine down stairs.

A very realistic outcome is something along the lines of USC — and maybe worse — but drastic scholarship reductions are coming soon, which lessens the chance of a coach like Urban Meyer taking over the program, something that’d put a tourniquet on the blood that’s being shed.

Still, on field results still trump stability and until the Buckeyes prove they’ve lost it, it’s hard to catapult an Irish football program that’s just a year removed from its own coaching transition in front of one of college football’s perennial powers.
Verdict: Irish still in rearview mirror, but the passing lane is only a season or two ahead.

Well, it turns out that $40 million is worth more than worrying about NCAA sanctions, which seem closer to a slap on the wrist than an anvil being dropped on the Buckeyes. After one year with his family and tending to his health, Meyer is back in coaching and taking over Ohio State, at what looks to be another one of his “dream jobs.” (In his defense, I’ve got multiple dream jobs, too. If only the Twins were looking for a over-the-hill shortstop that can’t hit that moonlights as a million-dollar screenwriter and Naval Aviator.)

Meyer’s return to college football will make the state of Ohio much more competitive and he’ll also be recruiting a similar type of offensive athlete as Brian Kelly. He also might be making a sales pitch to one of the Irish’s coaches, with running backs coach Tim Hinton getting a lot of attention in the media as someone that might join the new Buckeyes staff.

Hinton’s brother Steve, a high school coach in the area, talked to the Lancaster Eagle Gazette about the opportunity to head back to Ohio State.

“Whenever Urban has gone to be a head coach, he has offered Tim jobs,” Steve Hinton said. “(Tim) had young kids and didn’t want to move for that reason. I know Tim and Urban talk throughout the year, and that they had a really good working relationship.”

Steve Hinton was unsure whether his younger brother would accept an Ohio State position under Meyer if he was pursued.

“It would be a tough decision to stay or to come home, especially because he loves Notre Dame and the atmosphere that’s there,” Steve Hinton said. “As a brother, I would love for him to come home, but I would understand if he stayed at Notre Dame.”

There has been no noise out of South Bend on Hinton leaving and he’s been visiting recruits this week and also has plans to stay on the trail into next week as well, according to several reports. Still, Hinton’s work with the running backs has been tough to ignore, and if he decides to join Meyer’s staff in what amounts to a horizontal move, it’ll be a tough loss to a unit that is in desperate need of coaching this offseason.


Here’s what I said then:

Remember when rival fan’s took to spelling Lloyd Carr’s name with three Ls, almost belittling the coach’s inability to win more than eight or nine games? That level of “mediocrity” wasn’t good enough for Michigan brass so they brought in West Virginia head coach Rich Rodriguez to kick-start a program that was still one of college football’s elite. Three loses became three wins and Rodriguez was never able to put together a defense that could withstand the Big Ten schedule, nor an offense that could make up for it.

After three turbulent seasons, Rodriguez is gone and Jim Harbaugh didn’t come to Ann Arbor. In his place, Brady Hoke, who has successfully played the “wake up the echoes” card that tends to work well amongst proud football programs.

The Wolverines staff has taken dead aim at reclaiming Midwestern recruits and the message has been well received. Still, Hoke’s new offensive system could detract from the one strength Michigan had last year — a potent spread offense that ran Denard Robinson into the ground.
Verdict: For as bad as the Rich Rod era was, he still took 2 of 3 from ND. Dead heat, with this season’s match-up the likely tie-breaker.

That Hoke won ten games, including victories over Notre Dame and more importantly Ohio State has to have Wolverines fans ecstatic. Defensive coordinator Greg Mattison transformed one of the worst defenses in school history into a statistically impressive group, and even while it was with a lot of smoke and mirrors, ten wins is ten wins.

Offensively, the transition to a pro set was a work in progress, with Denard Robinson still the team’s leading rusher and ball carrier. And while getting the losing streak off their back was nice, there’s got to be some sense of agony knowing that even in the Buckeyes worse moment, they still nearly had Michigan, with freshman quarterback Braxton Miller missing a wide open receiver streaking to the end zone near the end of the game. Now enter Urban Meyer, the perfect coach for Miller’s skillset.

With a recruiting class 23 deep — including 14 recruits that profile on the defensive side of the ball — Hoke and Mattison know they haven’t fixed anything yet. More impressively, the Michigan staff is doing their best to put a fence around the Midwest, with 17 recruits from Ohio and Michigan.


Here’s what I said then:

The Nittany Lions might not be that close geographically, but with Penn State in the Big Ten, they’ll always be considered Irish contemporaries. Call it a rite of autumn, but one of these years is going to be Joe Paterno’s last in State College, and when that happens, the fertile recruiting grounds of Pennsylvania and the Northeast should open up.
Verdict: The program may not be what it used to, but JoePa still has his pick of the region.

Obviously, nobody could have seen something like what’s happened coming, and Nittany Lion football will never be the same. Penn State is without a head coach, without any clear idea (or precedent) what the NCAA will do, and the damage Jerry Sandusky (and his enablers) did to the school is immeasurable.

From a pure football point of view, without a head coach, there’s no telling what this will do to the football program and recruiting. Right now names like Charlie Strong, Dan Mullen, Chris Petersen, Mike London, Al Golden, James Franklin and Pat Fitzgerald are being circulated as targets by Penn State websites. Not to say they’re dreaming, but stepping into Happy Valley right now is more than just taking a new job.

The Lions have 15 recruits on board currently, with names like Armani Reeves and Tommy Schutt familiar to Irish fans. Notre Dame wasn’t ready to accept Schutt’s commitment earlier this season when he was ready to give it. They’d likely take Reeves, though he said back in early November that he was 100 percent committed to Penn State.


Weekend notes: Recruiting Ohio, Bracketology, Cooks, Daniels and more

Davaris Daniels

It’ll likely be months until anybody is certain what the fate of Ohio State football will be, but that hasn’t stopped people from talking about it. If you’re looking for some context, Michigan blog MGoBlog.com revels in the comparison to USC (their conclusion: “Yeah, you guys are screwed), a benchmark that’ll likely be referenced a few thousand times before the NCAA Committee on Infractions puts the Buckeyes athletic program in its crosshairs.

With that angle in mind, Brian Kelly was asked earlier this week about the Ohio State problems and whether they effect the Irish’s recruiting efforts in the state of Ohio.

“It doesn’t,” Kelly said point-blank on Tuesday.

“We still have to be focused on what we’re about and what we’re looking for. If there’s a hole in recruiting because Ohio State is not on a kid because of what’s going on, that really doesn’t affect us. We’re still going to recruit the kind of guys that we believe fit at Notre Dame. If there are things ancillary that will work in our favor, we don’t sit around thinking about those things.”

In the two recruiting classes Kelly’s already signed, he’s made it clear that recruiting Ohio is important by the sheer volume of players he’s taken. Notre Dame has signed nine players from the Buckeye state in the past two classes, and the state of Ohio trails only Illinois for active members on the roster.

Here are the Ohio recruits Kelly inked in the last two classes:

     Alex Welch, TE (Ohio State offer)
     Derek Roback, LB
     Luke Massa, QB
     Matt James, OL (Ohio State offer)
     Andrew Hendrix, QB (Ohio State offer)
     Chase Hounshell, OL/DL
     Eilar Hardy, DB
     Jarrett Grace, LB (Ohio State offer)
     Brad Carrico, OL

The Irish already have Ohio native Taylor Decker committed to the 2012 class and are chasing another ten or so players from Ohio, many with offers from the Buckeyes. With or without Jim Tressel, it’s pretty clear Brian Kelly thinks he’ll do just fine.

“It’s been a great state, it’s a state we need to continue to work hard in,” Kelly said. “It was good for me in Cincinnati, and it’s going to be good for us at Notre Dame.”


You want a playoff in college football? Well, here’s likely your best chance… for now.

As part of the run-up to EA Sports’ popular videogame franchise, “NCAA Football 12,” EA is holding a bracket challenge to decide what college football tradition is the country’s best.

The Irish’s “Play Like A Champion Today” is the No. 1 seed in the tournament, and facing off with West Virginia’s “Hold the Rope” tradition. (I honestly didn’t know this existed…) Over 42,000 votes have been cast, with the Irish holding a 70/30 advantage over the Mountaineers, but be sure to continue to stuff the ballot box, because a dog fight is coming next round, with either Uga the dog from Georgia or Tennessee’s Smokey moving on to the quarterfinals.

If you are so inclined, help Notre Dame defend their No. 1 seed.

(Yep, it’s the offseason…)


Irish cornerbacks coach Kerry Cooks is on his way back from Orlando, where he was one of seven college football coaches selected to participate in the NCAA Champion Forum.

Put on in conjunction with the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA) convention, the Champions Forum focuses on a select group of minority coaches who have been identified as potential candidates to become college football head coaches.

Here’s more from UND.com on the focus on the initiative:

During the Forum, the coaches, athletics directors and speakers will have time to develop professional relationships in a more informal, private setting. There will be simulated interview sessions, media training, keynote speakers. There will also be opportunities to discuss key topics such as understanding and developing culture within their team and the athletics department and effectively engaging with the campus and academic staff after becoming a head football coach.

Through the Forum, the football coaches will have an opportunity to gain a better understanding of the search process and the steps taken by search firms and athletics directors when preparing to hire head football coaches to lead intercollegiate programs. In turn, the athletics directors and administrators will have opportunities to meet, interact and become better acquainted with the football coaches; become “champions” by assisting with the coaches’ continued career growth; and broaden their outlook on potential minority head coaching prospects within the NCAA.

Joining Cooks in Orlando were Michael Barrow, linebackers coach for Miami, Lawrence Dawsey, Florida State’s wide receivers coach, Gary Emmanuel, Purdue’s co-defensive coordinator, William Inge, Buffalo’s defensive coordinator, Brian Stewart, University of Houston’s defensive coordinator and Joel Thomas, Washington’s running backs coach.

This is Cooks’ second year on Brian Kelly’s staff and first year coaching cornerbacks.


Following up on the Matt Hegarty story, Davaris Daniels’ hometown newspaper, The Daily Herald, had an in-depth profile on the incoming freshman receiver after naming him the Lake County male athlete of the year.

Daniels starred on both the football and basketball team for Vernon Hills, something he’s done since his freshman year.

Clearly, Daniels leaves Vernon Hills as one of its best athletes in history. But he also goes down as one of Lake County’s most decorated and talented athletes, so it seems only fitting that Daniels has been named the Daily Herald’s male athlete of the year for Lake County.

“This all went by so quick,” said Daniels, who is eyeing a starting spot at wide receiver at Notre Dame, which opens football camp in eight days. “But it also seems like I’ve been in high school forever.”

Could be all those weeks, months and years of varsity pressures and expectations.

Not that Daniels ever seemed flustered by them.

He was on the radar of college recruiters almost from the moment he returned that kickoff for a touchdown. Yet, Daniels stayed grounded and kept his nose to the grindstone.

“DaVaris is a once-in-a-lifetime athlete to coach when you consider his abilities, work ethic and attitude,” Vernon Hills basketball coach Matt McCarty said. “His attitude has always been team first. Rarely do you see the complete package, but we have had it with DaVaris in both football and basketball.”

Daniels role in the offense could be rather large, depending on what happens with Michael Floyd and his uncertain return to the football team. Either way, if he’s even within two-tenths of a second of his reported 4.3 forty time, he can make an immediate impact as a returner or in the red zone, where his 6-foot-3 height and leaping ability should come in handy.

Another point of interest will be Daniels’ development as a wide receiver. He was used all over the field last season for Vernon Hills, which means he didn’t spend a ton of time concentrating on the nuances of the receiver position. Athletically, that’s a good thing for Daniels, but it also might make the transition a little harder.


Is it possible Notre Dame is continuing its way up the cool charts? Consider this article that came up in my Notre Dame news feed, from celebrity tabloid OK! Magazine:

“Selena Gomez & Taylor Swift Tried to Have a “Normal College Experience” at Notre Dame.”

Here’s the quote of record from Taylor Swift, whose younger brother is a Notre Dame student.

“So we fly to Notre Dame and decide we’re gonna fit in,” Taylor explains. “We went and we got all this Notre Dame gear so we’re like wearing the Notre Dame jacket and the Notre Dame visor and we learned that’s not how you fit in at college evidently.”

I expect every guy on campus to have two size-small “The Shirts” waiting for these girls when they try to come back for a game next year.


Lastly, for any fans of Friday Night Lights out there, we might have found a replacement for Tim Riggins.

Enter Cam McDaniel: