Tag: Power

Danny Spond

Recipe for success: Analyzing the Kelly recruits


It only took days for Notre Dame fans to cling to one of Brian Kelly’s first bits of coach speak. When asked about recruiting, one of the Irish’s new head coach’s perceived weak spots, Kelly uttered the term “Right Kinda Guys,” which instantly became preferred nomenclature for the recruits the former Grand Valley State, Central Michigan and Cincinnati coach would target.

In the days after Kelly took the job, with a recruiting cycle winding down, those “RKGs” looked like below-the-radar prospects that the head coach could mold using his tried and true developmental program. Little known guys like Danny Spond, Kona Schwenke, Tate Nichols and Bruce Heggie had people wondering if the Irish hired college football’s Billy Beane, with Kelly and his crew willing to play college football’s version of Moneyball, looking for outliers and unearthing gems while filling the Irish’s roster.

Of course, the 2011 recruiting cycle did plenty to dismiss those notions. In reeling in mega-defensive recruits Aaron Lynch, Ishaq Williams and Stephon Tuitt, Kelly proved all sorts of preconceived notions wrong when he landed not one, but three recruits that seemed to evade Irish coaches for a better part of a decade.

With over 40 commitments to the Brian Kelly regime since they took over in South Bend, it makes sense to take a look at the way Kelly has started to reshape the Irish roster, and see if there are any patterns emerging after two recruiting cycles.


Derek Roback, Big Skill — After being brought in with a transition to defense in mind, Roback couldn’t help but scratch the quarterback itch, and he transferred to Ohio. He’s now a tight end for the Bobcats.

Danny Spond, Big Skill — Another high school quarterback, Spond seemed like a safety at first look, but one year in he’s fighting for a starting job at outside linebacker.

Austin Collinsworth, Skill — Collinsworth came in a wide receiver, excelled in kick coverage and transitioned to safety this spring.

Kona Schwenke, Power — Plucked out of obscurity by Kelly and his staff, the Hawaiian transformed from a 215-pound tweener to a 285-pound defensive end.

Matt James, Power — Kelly’s first big recruiting win, the left tackle tragically passed away during a spring break accident before coming to campus.

Tate Nichols, Power — A jumbo tight end in high school, Nichols walked onto campus and spent his freshman year in the weight room, transforming into a 6-foot-8, 320-pound tackle.

Louis Nix, Power — Legendary for his commitment to Tony Alford and ND before a new head coach was ever hired, Nix has scary upside now that he’s committed to fitness during a redshirt season.

Luke Massa, Skill — Brought in to add depth to a thin quarterback position, Massa was the odd-man out in the spring QB derby, but impressed in his transition to wide receiver, flashing his athleticism and size.

Bruce Heggie, Power — Heggie came out of nowhere in recruiting, quite literally. With ND his first major offer, Heggie spent his freshman season as a redshirt, and now provides depth at defensive end.


While a guy like Roback didn’t last long in South Bend, Kelly immediately chased players that had the ability to fit in at multiple positions, with guys like Spond and Schwenke immediately blossoming into contributors as they rocketed up the depth chart. It’s hard to get a true feel for a football player after one year on campus, but Kelly’s main accomplishment in his first year of recruiting was bringing in physically capable players, adding bulk and athleticism to the front-seven, a widely recognized area of weakness for the Irish.


George Atkinson, Skill — Walks onto campus as a hybrid wide receiver/running back.
Josh Atkinson, Skill — Adds depth and prototype size at cornerback.
Kyle Brindza, Specialist — Immediately competes at all three kicking spots.
Jalen Brown, Skill — Versatile DB that will add depth at cornerback.
Brad Carrico, Power — Transitioned to offensive line during spring practice after early enrolling.
Ben Councell, Big Skill — Promising linebacker shot up recruiting boards after All-Star games.
Davaris Daniels, Skill — Elite athlete that should be in the mix immediately at wide receiver.
Matthias Farley, Skill — Raw but powerful player that Kelly called sleeper of class.
Everett Golson, Skill — Dual threat QB already showed his promise during spring drills.
Jarrett Grace, Big Skill — Physical middle-linebacker prospect likely will redshirt.
Conor Hanratty, Power — Interior offensive line prospect can take time in development.
Eilar Hardy, Skill — Promising cornerback might be most highly-anticipated DB in class.
Matthew Hegarty, Power — Elite tackle recruit has great size and athleticism.
Chase Hounshell, Power — Former Florida commitment should come in at defensive end.
Ben Koyack, Big Skill — One of the best prep tight ends in the nation adds to Irish riches at TE.
Aaron Lynch, Power — One of the most anticipated freshman defenders in the nation.
Nick Martin, Power — Zack’s brother could also become a center or any position on the line.
Cam McDaniel, Skill — Prolific Texas athlete will help in both run game and on punt return.
Troy Niklas, Power — Another two-way prospect that has the frame and physicality needed.
Anthony Rabasa, Big Skill — Dynamic South Florida recruit that could surprise people immediately.
Tony Springmann, Power — Massive prospect can flip to the offensive line if needed.
Stephon Tuitt, Power — Gigantic freshman will be physically ready to compete as a freshman.
Ishaq Williams, Big Skill — Spring practice helped get this elite recruit comfortable at OLB.


On Signing Day in 2010 Kelly outlined his needs in the next recruiting class and then he went out and accomplished exactly what he said he would, reeling in multiple front-seven and power-position prospects while replenishing the roster at cornerback and wide receiver. We’ve only seen moments of Aaron Lynch, Everett Golson, Ishaq Williams and the other early enrolled freshmen, but it isn’t difficult to hypothesize some big things out of a very impressive defensive recruiting haul.


Nicky Baratti, Skill — Physical safety also being recruited by many as a QB.
Scott Daly, Specialist — Long-snapper capable of taking over on both kicks and punts.
Ronald Darby, Skill — One of nation’s fastest recruits. Also elite cornerback prospect.
Taylor Decker, Power — Another massive lineman that profiles as a jumbo tackle.
Justin Ferguson, Skill — Big-time Florida wide receiver looks every bit the national recruit.
Deontay Greenberry, Skill — High-rising pass catcher that’s an instant match-up problem.
Mark Harrell, Power — Versatile offensive lineman that can play on both the interior and edge.
Romeo Okwara, Big Skill — Young prospect that could blossom into a 3-4 defensive end.
David Perkins, Big Skill — Local product is a physically gifted recruit that could play anywhere.
CJ Prosise, Skill — Safety prospect that adds size and toughness to back end of defense.
Tee Shepard, Skill — Tall and lanky cornerback one of the top recruits in the West.
John Turner, Skill — Big strong safety that proved he can run in space at ND camp.


The Irish spent much of the 2011 season playing two scholarship safeties, a roster imbalance that was magnified after early season injuries to Jamoris Slaughter and Danny McCarthy. Kelly has targeted physical safeties that can run, bringing in CJ Prosise, a hard-hitting 200-pound safety that finished second in the state 100 meters and John Turner, another big body that proved he could run at Notre Dame’s camp. Nicky Baratti fits the mold perfectly as well. In David Perkins, Kelly has shown he’s willing to go outside the mold if an athlete displays an exceptional trait, and Perkins’ performance at The Opening displayed the athleticism that made a scholarship offer a no-brainer. If you’re looking for what life could be like after Michael Floyd, look at Deontay Greenberry, a walking mismatch that’s raw but could be a red-zone specialist immediately.


Kelly’s recruiting categories caught notice, bringing in players not based on a specific position, but in three different distinctions: Power, Big Skill, and Skill. With guys like Brad Carrico, Bennett Jackson and Austin Collinsworth, it meant a switch to a different side of the ball. For guys like Kona Schwenke, he built himself into a different position grouping.

Here’s a look at Kelly’s recruits by grouping.

POWER (15 recruits)

Defensive Line: Kona Schwenke (DE), Louis Nix (NT), Bruce Heggie (DE), Chase Hounshell (DE or OT), Aaron Lynch (DE), Troy Niklas (DE or OT), Tony Springmann (DE or OT), Stephon Tuitt (DE).

Offensive Line: Tate Nichols (OT), Matt James (OT), Brad Carrico, (G/T), Conor Hanratty (G), Nick Martin (T/C), Taylor Decker (OT), Mark Harrell (G).

BIG SKILL (10 recruits)

Derek Roback (TE), Danny Spond (OLB), Justin Utupo (ILB), Ben Councell (OLB), Jarrett Grace (ILB), Ben Koyack (TE), Anthony Rabasa (OLB), Ishaq Williams (OLB), Romeo Okwara (OLB), David Perkins (OLB).

SKILL (17 recruits)

Offense: Luke Massa (QB/WR), George Atkinson (WR/RB), Davaris Daniels (WR), Matthias Farley (WR), Everett Golson (QB), Cam McDaniel (RB), Justin Ferguson (WR), Deontay Greenberry (WR).

Defense: Austin Collinsworth (S), Josh Atkinson (CB), Jalen Brown (CB), Eilar Hardy, (CB), Nicky Baratti (S), Ronald Darby (CB), CJ Prosise (S), Tee Shepard (CB), John Turner (S).


While you’d expect Kelly’s emphasis on power and big skill positions to be in stark contrast from Charlie Weis’ recruiting targets, the differences are noticeable, but subtle. Kelly has brought in more power players, Weis actually brought in more players that’d be categorized as “big skill,” while they’ve both targeted a similar ratio of skill players.

That said, where you notice the difference immediately is in physical size. Many of the recruits Charlie Weis brought in wouldn’t be on the Irish’s recruiting board. Sure, a guy like Darius Fleming — who doesn’t have idea size at Cat linebacker — would probably have flashed enough potential to have the Irish staff take a shot on him. (David Perkins is a perfect example.) But the largest difference in roster structure is the size of the power and big skill players, specifically on the defensive side of the ball.  The Irish brought in 13 players that are reportedly 6-foot-4 or bigger in 2011. No recruiting class under Charlie Weis had more than eight. Nobody will mistake football for basketball, but it seems as if Kelly is confident he can build a physically capable football player once he gets his hands on them. He knows that he can’t grow them.

It’s dangerous to reach conclusions on recruiting classes when most of the players we’ve discussed have yet to play a down for the Fighting Irish. But after taking a closer look at the construction of Brian Kelly’s roster, you notice the subtle and stark differences in his philosophy toward building a football team.


Signing Day 2011: Power

Aaron Lynch Army Bowl

(You’ll read about a dozen columns talking about the three position grouping distinctions and how Brian Kelly and his staff use them, giving Skill, Big Skill, and Power the opportunity to become this year’s RKGs as we meander into the offseason. Just remember, I started these columns before BK re-introduced it during his press conference.)

Power. A pretty easy concept to understand when you look at the characteristics of the recruits Brian Kelly and his staff added today. Consider:

Tally up the average height of every power player signed by the coaching staff, and it averages 6-foot-5. Of the players recruited by the Weis regime, here are the players that measure that tall at power positions: Trevor Robinson, Andrew Nuss, Taylor Dever, Lane Clelland, and Chris Stewart — each one of them an offensive lineman, helping to underscore just how schematically unbalanced the roster had become on the defensive side of the ball. In the power grouping that signed with the Irish today, only two players are below 6-5, Conor Hanratty and Nick Martin (both 6-4), and both of them are slated for play on the offensive line.

Height isn’t all that matters for a football prospect, but in the Irish’s 3-4 system, getting the defensive front up to size was a huge challenge for the Irish and something this recruiting class will certainly help balance.

“What we’ve added to the defensive line is guys that have the size and can push on the offensive line,” defensive line coach Mike Elston said. “We didn’t get knocked off the ball this season and now adding guys that are big enough and they’re going to be strong enough.”

We’ve already discussed a defensive line haul that’s as good as any Rivals has seen in its years of calcuating position rankings. Let’s take a look at all the Power players that signed with the Irish today:


Brad Carrico, DL: Carrico was the first commitment to the class of 2011 and he’s a big body that’s got the opportunity to play on either offensive or defensive line, though he’ll start on Bob Diaco’s side of the ball. Carrico committed early to the Irish, had offers from predominantly Midwestern schools and has the type of massive frame and an extra semester in Paul Longo’s strength program where he’s going to have an opportunity to contribute down the line, with his athleticism deciding whether it’s on offensive or defense.

Conor Hanratty, OL: The son of former Notre Dame All-American Terry Hanratty, the coaching staff has made it clear that Conor wasn’t offered a scholarship just because of the name on the back of his jersey.

“There are a lot of alumni out there that want to have their sons or daughters on scholarship at Notre Dame,” offensive line coach Ed Warinner said. “He’s a great technician. He’s a smart kid. He’s very physical and he plays hard. He could be a right tackle, right guard, possibly a center. He’s got the demeanor we like.”

Hanratty had offers from programs like Cal, Boston College and Florida State, and he’ll be plugged into an offensive line that returns 8 of its 10 top players.

Matt Hegarty, OL: Arguably the crown jewel of the offensive line recruiting class, Hegarty is a U.S. Army All-American that had offers from just about every top program in the country before pledging to Warinner and Kelly in November. A consensus Top 50 player in the country by every recruiting service, Hegarty’s got elite tackle size and athleticism that projects him to thrive on either the right or left side of the offensive line. While his recruitment didn’t get the headlines that Aaron Lynch or Stephon Tuitt got, you could make the argument that he’s the best offensive prospect the Irish signed.

Chase Hounshell, DL: Pledging the Irish late in the game after spending much of his recruitment committed to the Florida Gators, Hounshell was the Associated Press Ohio Division II co-defensive player of the year and a finalist for the Tony Fisher Award, given to the top high school football player in the Cleveland area. Hounshell will also start out on the defensive line but has the ability to shift to the other side of the ball if needed.

Aaron Lynch, DE: The recruitment of Lynch will likely go down as one of Notre Dame’s greatest recruiting stories never told, with the prized defensive end’s flip back to Notre Dame after committing to Florida State all but confirming Tony Alford’s place in the pantheon of great Irish assistant coaches. Lynch, already enrolled in school for two weeks, has every opportunity to get on the field immediately, helping a pass rush that could use more pressure on quarterbacks. Lynch is a massive defensive end that has elite speed off the edge, a dizzying prospect for a guy that’s yet to log serious hours in the weight room. Expect Lynch and Stephon Tuitt to anchor the defensive end positions after Kapron Lewis-Moore and Ethan Johnson graduate.

Nick Martin, OL: The brother of Zack Martin, Notre Dame’s best offensive lineman after only his redshirt freshman season, the younger sibling brings an All-State pedigree to South Bend that rivals his brothers. Named first-team All State by Indiana’s Associated Press, Martin flipped his commitment from Kentucky, where he was one of their biggest recruits. Nick adds another blue-chip tackle prospect that’ll help support an offensive line that returns four starters.

Tony Springmann, DE: Another Notre Dame prospect out of pipeline school Bishop Dwenger in Fort Wayne, Springmann is a jumbo-sized defensive end that the coaching staff is incredibly high on. Already listed at 6-6, 275, Springmann walks into Notre Dame this summer with the size needed to succeed as a 3-4 defensive end, and could grow his way into a player that could have an impact on both sides of the ball.

Stephon Tuitt, DE: Along with Lynch, one of Notre Dame’s best defensive line prospects since the Irish inked Victor Abiamiri. Tuitt was a five-star prospect according to Rivals and Scout, a consensus Top 100 player in the country and the Irish won a heated recruitment against Paul Johnson and the hometown Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets. Tuitt was a wrecking ball at the U.S. Army All-American game, where he physically dominated some of the most talented players in the country. Along with Aaron Lynch, Tuitt will likely see the field immediately.