Tag: Press Conference

Kona Schwenke

Tuesdays with BK: Temple edition


Brian Kelly started his weekly game press conferences today with 45 minutes of discussing Temple, the week one depth chart, and the state of the Irish heading into Saturday afternoon.

You can catch the entire press conference below, but let’s pull out the highlighter and cover some of the interesting stuff:


It seems as if Kona Schwenke looking good on UND.com practice report videos wasn’t just clever editing. The senior defensive lineman should turn into a versatile, important piece of the defensive front, especially with the injury to Tony Springmann.

From the sounds of it, Schwenke will be more than just Louis Nix’s back-up at nose guard.

“I think right now Kona has some flexibility where he could play some four and five technique for us,” Kelly said.  “So I think you’ve got some flexibility.  We think Tyler Stockton can come in and get some plays for us.  You could obviously put that math together and figure that third rotation could be Tyler Stockton with Kona playing a little bit, as well.”

More to that point, Kelly singled out Schwenke’s work over the summer as some of the most impressive on the team. It comes at a good time as well, with Schwenke able to spell Nix in the middle but quick enough to play out on the edge of the front.

“I think defensively Kona Schwenke has been a different player in the spring than he is right now,” Kelly said.  “He’s going to play a lot of football.  He could play for a lot of teams and make an impact.”

It might feel like crying over spilt milk right now, but Irish fans can think back to the Purdue game two seasons ago when Schwenke was forced into the game to take limited reps because of the lack of depth up front when Stephon Tuitt was suspended. If it were up to Kelly, Schwenke would’ve sat out that season, saving a year of eligibility, which would look pretty good with Nix all but guaranteed to leave school after he graduates and head into the NFL Draft.

Still, this should be a big year for Schwenke, who still looks like a great developmental find for this staff, who plucked a 230-pound Hawaiian out of obscurity and turned him into a defensive tackle that would’ve started on just about every team but the last few.


The opening game each season comes with some surprises, especially when opponents are transitioning coaching staffs. That’s certainly the case for Temple, where head coach Matt Rhule came from the NFL and defensive coordinator Phil Snow came from Eastern Michigan.

Kelly talked about that challenge and how his team prepped for the unexpected.

“I think I know more about Eastern Michigan’s defense than I do anybody else,” Kelly said. “Coach Snow, who’s their defensive coordinator, was at Eastern Michigan last year, and I found myself talking in terms of what Eastern Michigan was doing, and clearly obviously that’s not their talent pool.  They’ve got Temple players.

“So there’s that unknown… Obviously with a new quarterback, a new offensive coordinator who comes from Tennessee Chattanooga, there’s so many different variables that go into the opener first of all.  Now add a new staff, a new head coach.  So we have to be on guard, and from our standpoint we’ve got to take care of what we do.”

In his latest post at the Philadelphia Inquirer, John Mitchell mentioned that the Temple offense should look an awful lot like the New York Giants attack if things are working properly. They’re shy of Eli Manning, Victor Cruz and Hakeem Nicks, but it’s just another part of the difficulty that comes with scouting an opponent with transition in the coaching ranks.


More than a few people wonder about the status of the relationship between head coach and starting quarterback. It hasn’t always been duckies and bunnies between Kelly and Tommy Rees, but it sure sounds like the head coach is in the quarterback’s corner when it comes to unequivocally stating that the offense is going to be more productive this year than last.

“You know, I mean, I’ve been doing it a long time,” Kelly said. “I mean, I don’t throw bouquets out unless I’ve got a pretty good idea of what I know.  Tommy Rees is going to help us score more points than we did last year, and our offensive line and our running backs and our balance at the wide receiver position is going to allow us.  He’s making good decisions.  He’s showing some escapability.”

While most people seem to subscribe to the mantra of “As Tommy Rees goes, so goes the Irish offense,” Kelly doesn’t quite feel that way. Mostly because of improved personnel that might not be as star-heavy as seasons past, but certainly is the most complete since Kelly arrived in South Bend.

“It’s not just going to be him,” Kelly said. “We can threaten you over the top.  We can push the ball over your head.  If you want to drop down on us, we’ve got some weapons that can beat you one‑on‑one, and we’ve got a quarterback that can see that and throw the ball to you.  We struggled with doing that at times last year.  We won’t struggle doing that this year.”


Tuesdays with BK: Moving on to Pitt

Brian Kelly spring ball

With a win against Michigan State in the rearview mirror, the Irish and head coach Brian Kelly move on to Pittsburgh and Todd Graham, who put himself on the map last year when his Tulsa team can to Notre Dame and shocked the Irish 28-27 last October. The win propelled a Tulsa team that was 4-3 to a 10-win season, putting its head coach on the national radar, where he was eventually scooped up by Pitt after its hiring and firing of former Miami (Ohio) coach Mike Haywood.

Graham came to Pittsburgh and has installed his up-tempo offensive attack while changing the culture of a physical pro-style program that Dave Wannstedt ran. The transition has been a mixed bag so far, with the Panthers sitting at 2-1 after a shocking defeat to Iowa courtesy of a fourth quarter collapse by the Panthers, exposed a few glaring deficiencies that still showed up against cupcakes Buffalo and Maine.

With both coaches familiar with the others’ personnel and system, Kelly is keeping the focus on his team as they prepare for their trip to the Steel City.

“You can’t come to practice now that you’ve won a game and feel as though, okay, we’ve arrived, because we certainly haven’t,” Kelly said this afternoon. “There are a lot things that we need to get better at if we’re going to be a consistent winner. Right now, they know they’ve got a lot of work ahead of them. I want to continue to see the same attention and focus in how we practice and carry that over into Saturday.”

Here are some highlights from Kelly’s Tuesday press conference. As usual, I’ll have some thoughts below.


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It turns out that unsportsmanlike conduct penalty on TJ Jones was a mistake by the Big Ten officiating crew.

“We got a clarification that that, in fact, is not a penalty,” Kelly said. “That was clarified yesterday by the Big 10 officials. Now, if he does that and puts it in somebody’s face or jumps into the Michigan State band, then that would be an unsportsmanlike penalty.”

Before we get a bunch of people citing their conspiracy theories, it’s good that this was addressed now and not in a game that was a close contest. With the Irish and a variety of other teams putting their team’s logo on the palms of their gloves, it was only a matter of time before someone was flagged for a penalty.

“We literally went over this specifically, because our gloves have the Fighting Irish on the inside,” Kelly explained. So when you put your gloves together, the fighting Irishman is on the inside of the gloves. So that’s my job immediately, because I saw that. That’s like giving your eight year old a lighter, you know what I mean? I knew this thing was going to be something that we were going to have to deal with. Certainly we brought it up and got the green light, so there was miscommunication along the way.”

It’s weird that SEC teams have been doing this since last year and nobody gets flagged. Notre Dame does it and a Big Ten official flags it. Chalk it up to an “innocent mistake” I guess.


Kelly got off the line of the press conference when he was asked if his 1-2 team had to worry about looking ahead.

“I’ll worry about that when they win six, seven, eight, nine in a row. We’re certainly not at that point yet,” Kelly said before getting out the winner. “We have not been infected with success yet. I’ll know when that happens. We need to win more and be consistent and attention to the detail things.”

A success infection. I think that sounds like a college football coach’s dream.


With the Tulsa game far enough in the past to think about again, Kelly was asked about Graham’s squad last year and was pretty candid with his answer.

“Well, they proved to be a very good football team. As you know, a top 25 team, 10-win plus team. It was a really athletic team. They had very good skill on the offense,” Kelly said. “I know people say, ‘Oh, it’s Tulsa.’ They were really skilled on offense. They had very dynamic players. They were opportunistic. They returned a deflected ball for a touchdown. They had a punt return. It was very opportunistic team defensively, an aggressive team defensively, and an outstanding veteran quarterback in their system. They had really good skilled players on the offensive side of the ball.”

There are certainly a lot of people that are still saying “Oh, it’s Tulsa,” but you tend to forget that the Golden Hurricane ended the season with seven straight wins, an impressive accomplishment regardless of what conference you’re in.


For the first time this season, the Irish didn’t have a 100-yard rusher or 100-yard receiver. But Kelly pointed out some of the important factors that led to convincingly handling a Michigan State team that was thought to be a top 15 team.

“You know, if you looked at it statistically, if you put up the stats of first three games and said, Pick which game they won, I don’t know that you would pick this one,” Kelly said. “But I think we all know how games are won: You control the line of scrimmage. I think really when we really pare it all down, our ability to have a running game that opens up so many other things that we can do, where we can get a one-on-one match up and hit T.J. Jones for a big touchdown. So if we go back to it, the Louis Nixes and a Sean Cwynars that are grinding it out inside, and the Chris Watts and Trevor Robinsons. Those are the guys that really had an impact.”

It was this nucleus that had Irish fans excited about the season and the potential of this group. The good news is, that didn’t change after two unfortunate Saturdays. Of course, the running game stalled out a bit in the second half, giving Kelly and Ed Warinner plenty of ammunition this week as they look to get a complete performance out of the offensive line.

Ruffer, QBs, Riddick and Floyd: Kelly recaps Year One

Brian Kelly - vs. Michigan
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In between crisscrossing the country reeling in recruits, Brian Kelly returned to South Bend for an important recruiting weekend and the year-end 2010 Football Awards Show. He also took a few minutes to recap season one with the media. (If you’d like to see the entire thing, our friends at UND.com have you covered.)

As always, here are some highlights, with a few observations included.

I mentioned it yesterday, but Kelly put any speculation to rest and announced that David Ruffer is going on scholarship.

“What I can report today is that we are going to award David Ruffer a scholarship for next year,” Kelly said. “I can make that announcement today. I will meet with our other fifth-year seniors on Monday and we’ll have an announcement on Tuesday relative to the remaining players.”

Kelly said that every fifth-year candidate applied to return, meaning Harrison Smith, Gary Gray, Taylor Dever, Mike Ragone, Andrew Nuss, and Matt Romine all have the option of coming back to school. According to Irish Illustrated, he also said after the press conference that taking Nate Montana off scholarship isn’t on his list of potential roster moves to get under the 85 man roster maximum.

I’m going to assume Smith, Gray and Dever are all back as starters. I’ll also assume that the coaching staff will continue recruiting Troy Niklas and Savon Huggins. That means there are two roster spots for the combo of Ragone, Nuss, Romine, Niklas and Huggins.

Of course, if Kelly’s spoken with a veteran who hasn’t cracked the lineup and might want to transfer (i.e. a Deion Walker), that’s something he’ll know about and we won’t, especially if those players want to finish the semester and not fall behind academically.

We’ll find out more on Monday, but as I’ve said before, too many viable roster options is a good problem to have.


What a difference a spring makes. Last season, the coaching staff walked on egg shells as they gave Dayne Crist, six months off ACL surgery, virtually every rep in spring practice. This year, there’ll be six quarterbacks on the roster, with Crist reportedly ready to go.

“We think we’re going to be able to really do a lot more of those similar kinds of things and keep him involved and competing within our spring practice format,” Kelly said about Crist.

That said, there’s a very real problem of getting six quarterbacks reps and Kelly has spent a lot of time putting together a plan.

“I have formulated in my mind some real clear guidelines as to how we’re going to move forward there,” Kelly said. “Suffice to say, I’m pretty clear on the styles that we have and how to utilize those styles within our offense.

“We can’t work with six quarterbacks,” Kelly stated. “There will be some paring down. There will be some guys that understand if they’re not in that top four, they’re not going to be able to get reps at the position.”

That could mean position switches, that could mean roster moves, it could mean just about anything, but you’ve got to think the battle starts with Crist and Rees, includes Andrew Hendrix, and potentially Everett Golson, who enrolled early to get immediate work.

It’s amazing to think that after being thrust into a scholarship position because he was the No. 2 quarterback as a walk-on, Nate Montana could drop out of the top four quarterbacks but still be on scholarship.


When talking about position switches, Kelly tiptoed through some small moves before dropping a relatively large bomb on everyone.

“What our identity became, compared to what it was at the start of the season, you could make the case now that Theo Riddick should be a running back,” Kelly said. “Or an offensive lineman that played tackle should play guard. Or you’ve got three or four tight ends, how are you going to use them all? As I said, Year 2 for us is less about laying down a system of offense or defense or special teams and more about utilizing the players we have that can help us win football games.”

We can parse words and take guesses what offensive linemen might shift inside or out, but the news that Kelly would consider moving Riddick back to running back after successfully teaching him the Z-receiver position is pretty amazing. When pressed further, here’s what Kelly said.

“I think we’re going to have that conversation as a staff,” Kelly said. “I think we’re going to have to vet that out. I’m not ready to do that right now.”

It could be to get TJ Jones more playing time in the slot, or it could be to use Riddick in more of a Percy Harvin-like role, but it’s almost refreshing to know that the coaching staff isn’t afraid to move one of its best returning players if they think it’s going to help the team.


When asked about his star receiver coming back, Kelly was pretty adamant that he landed the number one recruit on his board.

“He’s the No. 1 signee, no question,” Kelly said. “If there’s a sixth star, he gets a sixth star. And it’s more than just what he does on the football field. He’s a workhorse. He sets the bar for how our guys work in the offseason and those are obviously big pieces.”

To give you a better idea of what type of kid Michael Floyd is, Kelly recounted the morning Floyd told him his decision.

“He informed me in the morning that he was coming back,” Kelly said. “Our conversation really from there was about how we wanted to release it. As you know, Mike is not a big press conference guy. Of course, we wanted to have a press conference, and we were even going to serve food. It was going to be a big event. He didn’t want to do that. We met, he said let me think about it, I’m going to sleep on it. He came back the next morning and informed me that he was coming back.”


If you’re looking for one paragraph to encapsulate what year one of the Kelly era looked like to the head coach himself, here’s the quote of record:

“The program, the first year, the first coat of paint is a phrase I use a lot,” Kelly said. “That’s the relationship that we build with our players in year one. It’s my philosophy coming about through the year, the message and how we expect our players to represent Notre Dame – all of those things took place in year one. Other than winning only eight football games, which is not enough to win in the first year, we accomplished a lot of the real foundation principles of a championship program. Our football team was better at the end of the year and will continue to progress as we move into year two.”



Tuesdays with BK: Tulsa edition


With the honeymoon officially over after last week’s loss to Navy, Brian Kelly met with the assembled media.

Here’s a slice of what he said:

Some thoughs:

I’m feeling pretty good about my injury diagnosis of Ian Williams, with the “no surgery” call part in my one paragraph of medical analysis. Again, I’m no doctor, but from what I’ve heard an MCL tear and MCL sprain are practically the same thing, depending on the severity.

Here are Kelly’s official comments on the injury:

“Well, it seems to be the worst-kept secret in America. Ian Williams will be out four to six weeks, and we will be able to modify any of those comments based upon when we can get him moving around again. It’s an injury that some come back quicker than others. We’ll be able to get a better feel for it probably next week after we get it to calm down and go from there.”

When asked if it was a sprain or tear, Kelly was crystal clear.

“Sprain,” he said. “No surgery.”

I guess that would qualify as the lone ray of sunshine from the Navy game.


The Kona Schwenke era begins at Notre Dame, one season ahead of schedule.

I don’t think anybody expected to have Kona Schwenke make his way into the two-deep this season, and the best thing for him would’ve been saving a year of eligibility. But the injury to Williams, and a general lack of depth reshuffled the entire defensive front’s depth chart, with Sean Cwynar moving into the starting nose guard slot.

“Sean’s been a consistent performer in there when Ian came out of the game so, we feel good about Shaun stepping in for that position,” Kelly said. “The next player, really, for us, is Hafis, and Sean can’t play the whole game. He doesn’t have the work volume to do that yet. So Hafis and Sean, together, can get that done. So that then meant who becomes the next guy in at the defensive end, and we want to take a good look at Kona. So Kona would be that next defensive end, and whether it’s for Ethan or whether it’s for Kap, who knows. We’ll kind of see how that plays out this week and then Emeka, we believe Emeka can give us some reps, as well.”

Kelly was clear why he was willing to burn a year of eligibility in the ninth week of the season.

“Got to help us win games. This is still about winning, and we are in that mode where we have got to win some more games obviously,” Kelly said. “You know, getting to a Bowl game is very important, so this isn’t one of those, let’s ride out the streak here. We need help.”


One of the better points made during the press conference was that of the “growing pains” experienced not just on the offensive side of the ball, but on the defensive side as well.

“There’s a lot of ways to look at it. It’s not like we were in the top 20 in defense last year,” Kelly said. “So I think if we had a national caliber-defense last year, we probably would be a little bit concerned right now. I think we have made great strides defensively, even putting in a new scheme with the 3-4 defense. So I think it’s perspective. My perspective is, and I see it every day, is that we have made very good progress defensively and I think we’ll continue to make that as we go forward.”

While many don’t like to hear this and feel like it’s Kelly making excuses, there’s a widely known old axiom that mentions chicken salad and… well — other chicken stuff, and I think that’s probably befitting of the situation here.


Besides the achievement of just reaching the postseason, one of the biggest reasons why the Irish want to get to a bowl game is the extended practice time.

“It’s an important goal. We need those 15 practices,” Kelly said. “They are very important to the development of our program and moving forward. Those 15 practices are important. So, you know, getting to a Bowl game allows you more time with your players. I need more time with our guys. Our coaches need more time with our players. So, yeah, it’s very important to us, and it’s important to the development of our program.”

One of the reasons I thought the Irish should’ve gone to a bowl game last year was to get the extra practices needed to develop the youth on this roster, though the logistics of that would’ve been an absolute nightmare, with most of Kelly’s staff coaching at Cincinnati, and quarterback Dayne Crist less than three months into rehabbing his ACL.