Tag: Rashad Kinlaw

Matt Cashore / Irish Illustrated

Rashad Kinlaw dismissed from Notre Dame football program


Notre Dame football coach Brian Kelly announced that rising sophomore Rashad Kinlaw was dismissed from the program. The cornerback from New Jersey had been participating in spring practice up until this point, but is no longer a part of the football team.

“From my perspective, from a football perspective, he didn’t live up to the rules within our football program,” Kelly said after Friday’s practice.

Kinlaw didn’t play in 2013, spending much of the season working with the scout team as a quarterback. The 5-foot-11, 191-pound cornerback was fighting for playing time this spring, working behind starters KeiVarae Russell and Cole Luke, and nickel back Matthias Farley.

On the field, the loss won’t be felt immediately. But Kinlaw earned rave reviews as an athlete during his recruitment, though his junior and senior seasons of high school football were cut short by leg injuries.

Seniors Josh Atkinson and Jalen Brown will likely slide up the depth chart. Sophomore Devin Butler was seen practicing earlier this week as well, though held from contact after offseason shoulder surgery. Florida transfer Cody Riggs joins the program this summer and should immediately contribute, likely starting opposite Russell, or playing in the slot.

The South Bend Tribune confirmed that Kinlaw is still enrolled in school.

Offseason cheat sheet: Defensive backs

Carlo Calabrese, KeiVarae Russell, Bennett Jackson

When Brian Kelly took over the Notre Dame program, he was tasked with not just rebuilding the secondary, but reloading it. While he was lucky to inherit a front line of talented players, he was left with a depth chart that was frighteningly thin. No position better illustrated that than safety. When Jamoris Slaughter was injured in Kelly’s opening game, the depth chart didn’t go two deep with scholarship players.

My how things have changed. First Kelly reloaded at safety, filling the depth chart with quality prospects. Last cycle he took dead aim at cornerback, adding three talented youngsters. After making it through last season with three first-year starters, all converted offensive players, the secondary should be an equal to the front seven.


Kerry Cooks and Bob Elliott had their hands full last season, forced to get KeiVarae Russell up to speed after spending all summer as a running back-in-training and Bennett Jackson through the season with a bum shoulder. They also had to make the safety position work after losing key reserve Austin Collinsworth before the season started and top shelf starter Jamoris Slaughter in the season’s first month by plugging in Matthias Farley.

The growing pains that we never even saw will pay dividends this season, with Russell, Jackson and Farley all expected to be high level contributors. Fighting for time are returning players expected to play big roles in ’12, like Lo Wood, now back from an achilles injury, and Collinsworth, healthy after back and shoulder ailments.

Youth will immediately challenge to get on the field, namely elite recruits Cole Luke and Max Redfield. Both have already passed veterans on the depth chart, which contributed to the transfer of safety Chris Badger and Josh Atkinson’s move to wide receiver. But even with the attrition, and a season ending injury to Nicky Baratti, depth should be the strength of this group.


Here’s an breakdown of the cornerback and safety personnel:

Bennett Jackson, Sr. #2
KeiVarae Russell, Soph. #6
Lo Wood, Sr. #23
Cole Luke, Fr. #3 (or #36)
Jalen Brown, Jr. #21
Devin Butler, Fr. #12
Josh Atkinson, Jr. #24
Rashad Kinlaw, Fr. #26
Connor Cavalaris, Jr. #47
Joe Romano, Sr. #35
Jesse Bongiovi, Fr. #34

Matthias Farley, Jr. #41
Austin Collinsworth, Sr. #28
Elijah Shumate, Soph. #22
Eilar Hardy, Jr. #4
Max Redfield, Fr. #10
Nicky Baratti, Soph. #29
John Turner, Soph. #31
Eamon McOsker, Soph. #46
Drew Recker, Fr. #39
Ernie Soto, Jr. #43


The two deep in the secondary was probably one of the big surprises of week one. That Cole Luke worked his way into the rotation this early in the season shows you what type of talent the Arizona native brings to South Bend. Kelly plans on using Luke in nickel and dime packages, and likely special teams, as he’ll be wearing No. 36 this Saturday so as not to run into eligibility issues when he and Amir Carlisle are on the field together.

Perhaps also surprising is Eilar Hardy’s ascension into the two-deep at safety. Hardy is listed, not five-star recruit Max Redfield, as a key back-up, perhaps a surprise nearly bigger than Austin Collinsworth beating out Elijah Shumate for the starting safety job opposite Matthias Farley.

Kelly expects Collinsworth and Shumate to both play, calling them 1A and 1B. And while Redfield isn’t in the two deep, that might not be for long, as the Southern California native is too dynamic of a football player to stay off the field for long, but needs to know all the responsibilities heaped on the last line of defense.

With a front seven that’s as dynamic as Notre Dame’s, it’ll be interesting to see what Bob Diaco and Kerry Cooks have in store for the secondary. After last year’s mostly vanilla offerings, there’s every reason to believe that the Irish can mix coverages and feel confident putting their cornerbacks on an island, adding more to an already potent pass rush.

Freshman Focus: Rashad Kinlaw

Rashad Kinlaw

There’s so much we don’t know about Rashad Kinlaw. A prospect that missed a large portion of his final two seasons of high school football, Kinlaw nonetheless caught the eye of the Irish coaching staff, who offered the New Jersey product a scholarship early in the recruiting process.

What Kinlaw will bring to campus should be interesting. With a highlight reel that consists mostly of quarterback scrambles, Kinlaw has only a sophomore season that gives you a clue he has some aptitude for the cornerback position — his six interceptions that year came on just 32 defensive snaps.

Numbers like that — seemingly illogical production — makes Kinlaw one of the most exciting sleeper prospects in the class. Outside of that and some YouTube clips, we’ll have to wait until Kindlaw shows up on campus to know more about him, down to even the simplest things like his actual height and weight. (Depending on the recruiting website, Kinlaw is anywhere from 6-foot-2 to 5-foot-11.)

Let’s take a closer look at the promising athlete that the Irish project at the cornerback position:


It’s hard to get much respect on the national recruiting scene when two broken legs eat up most of your junior and senior seasons, but Kinlaw still had a nice, albeit regional, offer list, with Boston College, Penn State, Rutgers and Temple offering from the Northeast, with offers from Iowa, N.C. State, and Nebraska sprinkled in as well.

Somebody must have seen Kinlaw play from USA Football, as the multi-threat athlete played at wide receiver during summer exhibitions before breaking his leg again, costing him most of his senior season.

Viewed as one of the elite athletes in New Jersey, Kinlaw was nonetheless a three-star prospect by most recruiting services, though he has the opportunity to be one of the underappreciated players in the ’13 recruiting class.


There’ll likely be a significant learning curve for Kinlaw as he transitions to cornerback for the first time in his career. That change could take some time, and with a trio of veterans locking down the top three spots on the depth chart, there’s no need for Kinlaw to come in and immediately contribute.

That said, if the Irish are looking for recruits that can step in at wide receiver, Kinlaw seems like a good candidate because he’s so explosive with the ball in his hands. A compact athlete with all sorts of athleticism (his high school coach said he ran two low-4.4 forty-yard dashes for former Rutgers coach Greg Schiano at a Rutgers camp), Kinlaw could be a guy similar to Matthias Farley and CJ Prosise where they get him to campus and see where he fits then.


Kinlaw’s inexperience at cornerback is one of the things the Irish coaching staff thinks he has going for him. Just like KeiVarae Russell, there are no bad habits the Irish staff will need to break Kinlaw of, and Kerry Cooks and Bob Elliott are getting a mold-able athlete.

“We love his size, his length, his athleticism,” Brian Kelly said on Signing Day. “We think it’s an untapped resource for us in that we’re only going to get him better and better physically, and he has the speed, he has the ability to play the ball. We think he’s going to fit well at the cornerback position for us.  He was somebody that we identified early in this process and felt like he would be a great addition to this class.”

While he’s a life long Notre Dame fan, Kinlaw is far from a profile recruit for the Irish, coming out of a Absegami program that doesn’t have much of a relationship with Notre Dame. Combine that with a fairly serious ankle injury that required two surgeries to properly repair, and Kinlaw’s one of the great mystery prospects in this recruiting class.