Tag: Rivals100

Kendall Fuller

Recruiting carousel restarts with 2013 Rivals100 list


Notre Dame hasn’t stopped chasing 2012 prospects. But that doesn’t stop the recruiting carousel for spinning, as the lifeblood of college football — not to mention a multi-million dollar internet industry — continues to churn as college programs turn the page to a new year’s worth of recruits.

Nothing signals that more than the new release of the Rivals100 list for the class of 2013. Sure, we’re 363 days from Signing Day, but that hasn’t stopped Rivals, still the gold standard for talent evaluation, from releasing their top 100 juniors in the country. And as you’d expect, Notre Dame has identified quite a few players on the list.

(Disclaimer: After spending about 16 hours a week ago following every twist and turn in a pretty interesting Signing Day, forgive me if I’m not 100 percent passionate about this group of players just yet.)

Let’s take a run through the top 100 players in the country and highlight some of the players we’ll likely be talking about for the next 12 months…

RIVALS100 FOR 2013

COMMITTED: No. 49 — Steve Elmer, OT: Midland, Michigan — Elmer is the Irish’s lone 2013 recruiting commitment and one of the nation’s top offensive tackles. He’s planning on enrolling early next year and will ideally anchor a recruiting class filled with multiple offensive linemen.

No. 4 — Kendall Fuller, CB: Olney, Maryland — After being unable to hold on to the commitment of Maryland’s best cornerback in the 2012 class, the Irish are right back after Fuller. Kendall has two brothers playing for Frank Beamer at Virginia Tech, but lists the Irish in his top schools.

No. 5 — Su’a Cravens, DB: Murrieta, California — Mike Denbrock has already built a relationship with one of the nation’s most sought after defensive backs, who has plenty of options already. After pulling Tee Shepard out of Fresno, let’s see if Denbrock can pull another blue-chipper out of Southern California.

No. 10 — Vernon Hargreaves III, CB: Tampa, Florida — Hargreaves picked up an offer from the Irish in the fall, after watching the team his father coaches, the USF Bulls, beat the Irish. Tony Alford is likely the recruiter on Hargreaves case, and even with offers from all the major Florida programs and Ohio State, Hargreaves has ND among his favorites.

No. 11 — Tyrone Swoopes, QB: Whitewright, Texas — At six-foot-five, 220-pounds, and with recruiting tape that shows dazzling running ability, it’d be fun to see what the Irish could do with an athlete like Swoopes.

No. 15 — E.J. Levenberry Jr., OLB: Woodbridge, Virginia — The Irish are one of many top programs chasing one of the nation’s top linebackers. He’s a big linebacker that looks comfortable in both space and rushing the passer.

No. 17 — Michael Hutchings, LB: Concord, California — Another blue-chip player out of California powerhouse De La Salle, most of the Pac-12 is after Hutchings. The Irish offered recently and are in Hutchings’ top five.

No. 18 — Ty Isaac, RB: Joliet, Illinois — If you’re looking for a skill player that’s in the Irish’s crosshairs, look no further than Isaac. One of the top prospects in the Chicagoland area, Isaac has already been on campus multiple times and has long held an Irish offer. Chuck Martin is on the case, and absolutely needs to reel Isaac in. A nationally offered player that’s as close to a must-get recruit as there is.

No. 22 — Adam Breneman, TE: Camp Hill, Pennsylvania — Breneman was identified as the Irish’s No. 1 tight end prospect in the class of 2013. They weren’t alone. The potential five-star player will likely have the Nittany Lions in this battle to the end. A good test case for Scott Booker, who Rivals lists as Breneman’s primary recruiter.

No. 23 — Greg Bryant, RB: Delray Beach, Florida — Bryant has offers from Alabama, Ohio State, and just about every other major program in the country. Add Notre Dame to that list. Another Tony Alford project.

No. 26 — Robert Foster, WR: Monaca, Pennsylvania — Raised plenty of eyebrows at the Army All-American combine with an impressive performance. Notre Dame listed among his top programs, but plenty of big fish are also chasing him.

No. 27 — Ethan Pocic, OT: Lemont, Illinois — Another big offensive line prospect from a state that the Irish consider their backyard. Pocic earned an offer from the Irish at camp last summer and plans on being on campus again soon.

No. 28 — Eli Woodard, CB: Voorhees, New Jersey — Woodard got his first scholarship offer from Notre Dame last summer at camp, and has since done nothing but impress. Bob Diaco is his primary recruiter, and he’ll need to be at his best if they’re going to out-duel Ohio State.

No. 30 — Max Redfield, DB: Mission Viejo, California — Playing out of one of Orange County’s premiere high schools, Redfield already has offers from both UCLA and USC, with the Irish also in play. He’s already said he plans on taking an official visit to South Bend, but the Irish would love to get him to campus even sooner.

No. 31 — Laquon Treadwell, WR: Crete, Illinois — Another Illinois product, Treadwell and Brian Kelly spoke last week, reconfirming the Irish’s interest in the lanky wide receiver. He’s a guy that could likely walk in and play quickly.

No. 32 — Leon McQuay, DB: Seffner, Florida — Another premiere athlete, McQuay also sports a better than 4.0 grade-point-average, making him an attractive target. Holding an Irish offer from the spring, McQuay has the Irish in his top five.

No. 34 — Jaylon Smith, LB: Fort Wayne, Indiana — Another guy that should be atop Notre Dame’s recruiting lists. Has a brother that’s a running back at Ohio State, so the Irish will likely be fighting another battle with Urban Meyer.

No. 36 — Trey Johnson, LB: Lawrenceville, Georgia — Already committed to Auburn, the Irish likely will continue to fight for a visit from this elite inside linebacking prospect.

No. 38 — Antonio Conner, DB: Batesville, Mississippi — Notre Dame doesn’t pull too many players out of Mississippi, but there’s mutual interest here. He’s got prototype size at safety and has the offers to prove his ability.

No. 39 — Marcell Harris, DB: Groveland, Florida — Another defensive back that has an Irish offer. Has the big three Florida schools chasing him as well.

No. 43 — Henry Poggi, DL: Baltimore, Maryland — A front-seven player that’s got elite offers, Poggi caught the Irish’s victory over Maryland at FedEx Field last year.

No. 50 — Garrett Sickels, LB: Little Silver, New Jersey — A great list of offers for this New Jersey native with a really good profile for an outside linebacker in the Irish system. Looks like an impressive athlete.

No. 59 — Ahmad Fulwood, WR: Jacksonville, Florida — Fulwood has had an Irish offer since before his junior season and has the elite of college football chasing the 6-4 speedster. He expressed interest in visiting South Bend, but hasn’t gotten to campus yet.

No. 60 — Kyle Bosch, OT: Wheaton, Illinois — The Irish were slow to offer Bosch, but that changed when Harry Hiestand connected with the Illinois native after coming aboard. Notre Dame should be in this until the end.

No. 85 — Jaynard Bostwick, DL: Port Saint Lucie, Florida — Bostwick is likely a defensive end in Notre Dame’s system with the chance to slide inside depending on the front. He’s talked about setting up a visit at Notre Dame after being offered by the Irish in December.

No. 90 — Ryan Green, RB: St. Petersburg, Florida — Green was in South Bend for the Irish’s dominating win over Air Force. He’ll likely have Notre Dame in the running for his services until the end, but will also weigh offers from the power Florida schools and other powers as well.


For those keeping track, that’s 26 players from Rivals’ debut list — 14 of the top 30 players in the country¬† — that have scholarship offers from the Irish. Notre Dame has also offered a dozen more players that they’ve evaluated as better fits for their program.

It might be tough sledding for the Irish to close the deal on a majority of these recruits, but at the very least, you get to dispel the notion that the Irish don’t have access to the best talent in the country. With an early start on most of these players, Notre Dame will push to get as many to campus as soon as possible, building up a familiarity with the school that will be better than simply getting one-shot on an official visit weekend.


Quick look at Rivals100 dispels some recruiting myths

Green Beckham

It’s been spoken as gospel that Notre Dame won’t have access to the best players in the country because they can’t get them through admissions. It seems to be a rallying cry for Irish fans looking for reasons why Notre Dame has suffered to compete these past two decades. It’s also been a common knock against Domers by rivals and foes, as if Notre Dame’s own admissions policy fuels the elitist sentiment that has turned the Irish into the country’s most polarizing college football program.

As flawed as analyzing recruiting rankings can be, a quick look at yesterday’s Rivals100 rankings for the class of 2012 shows that the Irish have a better shot at the top players in the country than you might think. After a quick but thorough analysis of reported scholarship offers that the Irish coaching staff have made to next year’s class, the Irish have verbal offers out to 68 of the top 100 players in the country — far more players than you’d expect.

First a few observations:

It doesn’t take much analysis to understand that Brian Kelly’s recruiting philosophy is much different than that of Charlie Weis or Ty Willingham. Part of that reflects a philosophical change in the recruiting process that’s happened as the timeline for elite players has shifted earlier and earlier and part of that is likely based on Kelly’s 20-plus years of experience in college football.

For as easy as it is to make jokes about Willingham’s priorities (namely his golf game), the Irish were never out front in recruiting players during his regime, and Willingham was far from active on the recruiting trail, often times sitting out the spring evaluation period when head coaches were allowed to visit schools. The story of Willingham spending hours in blue-chip recruit Brian Toal’s living room, only after he starred in the Army All-American Bowl and dismissed the Irish, epitomizes the criticism of Willingham in the eyes of the Irish faithful.

Weis’ recruiting problems were really only visible in hindsight. Effort was certainly not the issue, but rather Weis’ inability to build a roster cost him. (Though, to be fair, the roster given to him was in absolutely ravaged condition, thanks to Willingham’s inability to stock his last two recruiting classes with BCS caliber players.) Regardless, Weis’ lack of attention to player development contributed to ending his run as head coach, and his recruiting misses and lack of bodies in power positions were fatal flaws as well. Weis seemed to downplay the difficulties of recruiting to Notre Dame, “We’ll find the guys that can read and write,” but his strategy of emphasizing specific recruiting targets didn’t have nearly enough room for contingency plans. Eleventh hour defections, especially on the defensive side of the ball, really hurt the Irish roster. (Not to mention three defensive coordinators in Weis’ tenure.)

Meanwhile, Brian Kelly and his staff, led by Chuck Martin, have offered far more scholarships than any Irish coach in the modern recruiting era. And if a quick run-down of the Rivals100 says anything about the Irish efforts, they’re after just as many elite kids as any other major BCS program in the nation.


Of the top 10 recruits on Rivals’ board, the Irish have offered eight of them, with only DE Darius Hamilton of Don Bosco Prep in New Jersey and DT Ellis McCarthy, a USC lean from Monrovia, California without Notre Dame offers. Of the top 20, the Irish have offered 16 prospects, and 21 of the top 25.

If you’re looking for a pattern of players that stayed off the Irish board, that’s also pretty illuminating. Of the Top 50 players on Rivals’ list that Notre Dame didn’t offer, only three of them were offensive players, with drop-back quarterback Zach Kline, already a Cal commit, not gathering an Irish offer. Of the 33 players that the Irish didn’t offer, half of them are front-seven players and almost two-thirds of them are “power” players (adding in offensive linemen).

There’s no way good way to tell who was kept off the Irish board; whether they couldn’t get through admissions or whether they simply didn’t fit Notre Dame’s system. Defensive tackles, traditionally one of the hardest positions to recruit at Notre Dame, also must now profile into the 3-4 system, which could help explain why there are so many left off ND’s list. Same thing with outside linebackers — where a recruit like Joe Bolden, a Cincinnati kid from an Irish feeder school — didn’t get an offer because he didn’t physically profile into the Irish system, and has now committed to Michigan.

Either way, after analyzing the Rivals100 list, it’s clear that the Irish are certainly chasing some of the top players in the country. That doesn’t mean they’ll land most of them, but it does mean they’re at least able to play the game.

And for Irish fans constantly worried that Notre Dame is forced to battle with one hand tied behind its back, being in the game should be good enough.