Tag: Ronald Darby

Greenberry Houston

The ones that got away


Brian Kelly wanted to keep the focus on the players that decided to sign letters-of-intent with the Irish. And with a recruiting class compiled of 16 talented players — a lean class no doubt, but far from a program killer — that sentiment is certainly understandable.

But we’ll have four years to judge the talent coming in the door. Let’s take one last look at the one’s that got away:

DEONTAY GREENBERRY: From Notre Dame to Houston

How bad was it? Greenberry’s departure was one of the more shocking turns in recent Irish recruiting history, ranking up their with Lorenzo Booker picking the wrong hat and quarterback C.J. Leak leaving Bob Davie at the altar. Of course, both those losses seemed much worse at the time than during their playing careers with Leak flaming out and Booker never being able to carry the load of an every down back. Still, Greenberry’s shocking decision went viral on the internet, and the hundreds of comments that flooded into the live blog at least reflect the perceived importance of landing Mr. Football in California for the Irish, especially at a position of need.

Impact on the field? Greenberry seemed like the most likely to replace Michael Floyd, and he certainly has the jump ball skills to do so. That said, the fade route and 50/50 passing game that Charlie Weis employed with guys like Floyd and Jeff Samardzija left when Kelly came to town, and any receiver playing in the current offense needs route running precision to get on the field.

In his own words: “I was going to Notre Dame for the wrong reason,” Shepard told the Fresno Bee. “Tee had committed to Notre Dame, and I wanted to be where he was at. Then I started sitting down and really thinking what’s best for me, where I would feel most comfortable. I’ve talked with him, and he’s good with it.”

Final Assessment: This one certainly hurt. Any time you’ve got a recruit wrapped up until the morning of Signing Day, only to lose him to the seventh or eighth most impressive college football program in the state of Texas, well — that’s a head scratcher. Of course, Greenberry could make an instant impact like a Sammy Watkins or disappear like Kyle Prater or Markeith Ambles, just two of many recent five-star wide receivers that didn’t live up to the hype. Not to wish it on Greenberry, but that’s just the nature of recruiting.

RONALD DARBY: From Notre Dame to Florida State

How bad was it? Irish fans were salivating over the idea of Darby and Tee Shepard joining forces and given the Irish two potential lockdown cornerbacks in a recruiting class that needed to upgrade the secondary. Darby was always the number one flight risk in this recruiting class, and his decommitment — while predictable — didn’t hurt any less just because people saw it coming. Still, Irish fans had to almost expect this with Florida State, who I’m sure didn’t pull any punches after last year’s snatch-back of Aaron Lynch.

Impact on the field? Darby had one unquestionable five-star component: Speed. How well he develops as a cornerback and football player, we’ll have to see. Still, there’s no doubting he’d have immediately challenged for playing time at cornerback, where just about everyone is unproven, and his speed could’ve quickly found its way into the return game alongside George Atkinson.

In his own words: “I liked the home feeling at Clemson, I liked the home feeling at Auburn and I liked the home feeling at Florida State, but I had to look past the red carpet treatment and look at the program that could better me as a person,” Darby told the Washington Post. “The difference was the young talent they have going and the need for DBs. They played a safety at cornerback in the Champs Bowl.”

Final Assessment: Fans and recruitniks have pointed to a rift between Darby and the Irish coaching staff over some perceived change in Darby’s recruitment. Area recruiter Charley Molnar’s departure and the coaching staff transition likely hurt Notre Dame, but anything Kerry Cooks did or didn’t do isn’t what sent Darby looking elsewhere. Notre Dame tried multiple times to get in the door with Darby in recruiting’s final weeks, but they were never even let in the house. Casting that aside, you begin to forget that other schools have depth chart problems, too. Florida State obviously sold theirs, not to mention an ACC track program, and enacted a modicum of revenge for the loss of Aaron Lynch.

TAYLOR DECKER: From Notre Dame to Ohio State

How bad was it? The writing was on the wall when Urban Meyer offered Decker a scholarship, then proceeded to bring in Irish coaches Tim Hinton and Ed Warinner, Decker’s area recruiter and position coach respectively. Decker was one of two offensive tackles in a three-man offensive line class, and the six-foot-eight, 320-pound prospect certainly looked the part of a blue-chipper. That it took Meyer only a few weeks to undo a commitment that had been one of Notre Dame’s longest gives you a glimpse into how things are going to go in the Midwest now that Ohio State is being run by one of the sports most ruthless recruiters.

Impact on the field? Probably not all that large actually. The Irish actually have their depth chart at offensive tackle pretty solidified and already have one of the nation’s best 2013 prospects committed in Steve Elmer. That said, bringing in only two offensive linemen in the class means that Notre Dame can’t afford to miss next year.

In his own words: “It’s always been a dream of mine,” Decker told the Dayton Daily News. “I’ve grown up an Ohio State fan; I grew up in Ohio an hour from Columbus, an hour from Ohio State. That’s what I’ve always known as far as college football. Especially when I was younger, that was everything. It’s definitely a great feeling and I’m excited for it.”

Final Assessment: If you believe what some have reported, Kelly didn’t waste too much time crying over Decker’s departure. I’m not sure that’s 100 percent true, but of all the guys the Irish loss, this one certainly should sting the least.

Irish head down recruiting home stretch

Nelson Agholor

Next Wednesday, thousands of college football fans around the country will wake up with it feeling like Christmas morning. That’s because after over a year of building relationships with high school prospects, fax machines across the country will get their annual workout as Letters-of-Intent roll into football offices, with Notre Dame expecting to receive fourteen letters (Sheldon Day, Gunner Kiel and Tee Shepard are already enrolled), with the potential to add another handful of elite players that could turn this class into one of the best in the country.

Next Wednesday, we’ll have a chance to roll out the players who have inked with the Irish. Until then, let’s take a look at the players still up for grabs.

With Gunner Kiel leaving LSU at the altar, the Irish managed to pull arguably the nation’s best quarterback into the fold at the eleventh hour, another amazing recruiting victory by Brian Kelly, who personally recruited Kiel for much of the process.

That said, if the Irish are going to move the needle at Signing Day, it’ll be because they added to their recruiting class with a last minute commitment from some of the most highly touted targets left on their board:

Nelson Agholor, WR: If there’s a big fish left on the offensive board, it’s Agholor. Unfortunately for the Irish, if they don’t end up reeling him in, they’ll likely still see him every season, as it’s looking more and more like Agholor could be heading to Southern California to play for the Trojans.

Agholor reminds me a bit of George Farmer, another all-everything recruit that ended up at USC, and bounced between running back and wide receiver this past season. Rivals.com has him in the top three at his position, among the top 20 players in the country, and he fits the academic profile of a Notre Dame student perfectly.

What he’d bring to ND: Teamed with Greenberry, Agholor would give the Irish the most celebrated recruiting class at the position in the country. (It can’t hurt that the Irish have been the landing spot for high profile transfers from both USC and Florida State, two finalists for Agholor’s services.)

Davonte Neal, WR: Notre Dame was able to get the first official visit for Neal, one of the Southwest’s premiere playmakers, who waited until after winning the Arizona state championship to take any official visits. The Irish are in good shape, but will likely battle through Signing Day for Neal, who plans on taking his time making a decision.

Expect Urban Meyer and the Ohio State Buckeyes to be the team to beat, with Neal having family in Ohio and getting the Meyer sales pitch that he’ll play the role of Percy Harvin. (That said, don’t count out Rich Rodriguez, now for the hometown Arizona Wildcats.)

What he’d bring to ND: It’s almost ridiculous to imagine the Irish landing both Neal and Agholor, giving the Irish three of the top players in the country at their position. Neal would immediately be the Irish’s most dangerous athlete in the slot, and his recruiting tape is about as impressive as it gets.

Arik Armstead, DL: What happens with Armstead (not to mention his brother Armond) is anyone’s guess. The mammoth prospect did the smart thing and passed up early enrollment, with just too many variables still in play. Already graduated, but not set to attend any school until summer, Armstead will likely attract visitors from every corner of the country, but Notre Dame will be there until the very end. As a two-sport athlete, Armstead will play basketball and football in college, and while talent evaluators can’t decide whether he’d be better on the offensive or defensive line, he’s the kind of prospect the Irish would just welcome in the door and figure out where to put later.

What he’d bring to ND: If Armstead ends up in South Bend, that’s another recruiting class where Notre Dame cherry-picks one of the nation’s top defensive linemen, after struggling to get anyone since what feels like the Holtz era. Armstead likely brings his brother Armond, who needs medical clearance for an undisclosed ailment, but is an NFL caliber defensive end with one year of eligibility remaining.

Ken Ekanem, LB: After loading up at the linebacker position, the Irish only have Romeo Okwara committed at the outside linebacker spot in the 2012 recruiting class. One name that might still jump on board is Virginia’s Ken Ekanem, a middle linebacker that tore his ACL during the state playoffs. The injury forced Ekanem to delay his official visit, finally set for this weekend. The Irish will likely battle Virginia Tech for Ekanem’s signature, and it still remains to be seen if they’re at a place where they’ll accept his commitment.

What he’d bring to ND: With Manti Te’o returning for his senior season, Ekanem would be a luxury item, and likely one that’d come to ND if the Irish miss on other targets that fill greater needs. Either way, Ekanem will likely spend 2012 getting healthy, especially with depth in the middle plentiful.

Ronald Darby, CB: Notre Dame long counted Darby among its most high profile commitments. But after staying true to his commitment for much of the process, Darby opened things up after the Under Armor All-American game, while still keeping the Irish in play along with Clemson, Florida State, and Auburn. Darby is among the fastest players in the country and Brian Kelly will be in his household to try and get Darby back in the fold.

What he’d bring to ND: If Darby ends up at Notre Dame, he’ll team with Tee Shepard to be the most impressive cornerbacking duo in the country (in terms of recruiting rankings). With both Gary Gray and Robert Blanton gone, Darby would step onto campus an immediate candidate for playing time and could make an instant impact on special teams as well.

Brian Poole, CB: The Irish haven’t given up on Poole, a commit to the Florida Gators who has built a strong relationship with Tony Alford. Poole is in that same stratosphere with Darby and Shepard, one of the best players in Florida and a guy that could also immediately challenge for playing time in South Bend. He’s reaffirmed his commitment to the Gators every time he’s been asked about it the media, but don’t expect the Irish to go down without a fight.

What he’d bring to ND: Another elite cornerback that’d immediately make a mark in the depth chart. If the Irish were somehow able to sign Darby, Shepard, and Poole, Irish fans should be dancing in the street.

Anthony Standifer, CB: Far from a backup plan, Standifer was long committed to Michigan before mutually parting ways with the Wolverines and opening back up his recruitment. The Illinois native was on campus last weekend, and it sounds like only a foreign language requirement (something he could pick up this spring) is in between the Irish and this 6-foot-1 cover cornerback.

What he’d bring to ND: Standifer might not come with the prestige of the guys we just listed, but he’s far from a program body and has offers from Pitt, Iowa, and Wisconsin — nothing to sneeze at. Standifer would give the Irish another versatile athlete at cornerback, helping solidify a spot with a lot of balls in the air.








Peer pressure only adds to recruiting drama

Ronald Darby

You can blame aggressive coaching staffs and negative recruiting spin. You can blame teams taking their eye off the ball and chasing uncommitted prospects while ignoring their verbal pledges. You can change instability on coaching staffs, with assistants bouncing from school to school, often at the most inopportune time. But in the era of made-for-TV All-Star games and high school football’s ever-expanding postseason, one of the biggest factors playing into the high stakes recruiting game are the very athletes being chased.

By the time Ronald Darby actually decides where he’ll attend college next year, he’ll have been dealing with daily media attention for the better part of two years. Text messages from school-affiliated websites, phone calls from reporters near and far, not to mention the barrage of official questionnaires, mailers, and letters that schools have been sending for the better part of three seasons. And that’s even before considering the personal relationships he’s built with coaching staffs, some of the most persuasive salesmen in business, all vying for the signature and services of one of the country’s fastest athletes.

“I wish I could split myself into pieces so I could go to several different schools,” Darby is reported as saying to ESPNU.

If the quote is true, who could blame him? And while Darby had long been committed to the Irish — and long been rumored to be the least stable of any commit — Irish fans have taken to pursing Darby’s public comments, like a jilted lover trying to piece together what went wrong in a relationship that had lasted almost long enough to be considered official.

In what’s starting to feel like a John Cusack movie, fans are trying to figure out what’s “changed,” after Darby told various reporters that his relationship with Notre Dame “changed” after a while. (It’s better than, “It’s not you, it’s me,” if that’s some consolation.) While Chuck Martin’s move from defense to offense might have been a small factor, the Irish defensive staff and system will be unchanged next year, with Bob Diaco still manning the ship. Coaches Tim Hinton, Ed Warinner and Charley Molnar would never have coached Darby anyway.

But what’s likely changed is the environment Darby has been surrounded by the past few weeks, as the red-carpet All-Star treatment of some of the nation’s most talked about recruits has high schoolers doing their best to become the next LeBron James, Chris Bosh, and Dwayne Wade.

After months of being hounded by reporters, coaches, and hanger-ons, games like the Semper Fidelis Bowl, the Army All-American Bowl, and the Under Armor Bowl give these athletes — with their choice of some of the biggest fish in the college football world — a chance to meet some of their peers, who they’ve been stacked up against for months.

With social networks and Twitter providing access to everyone and anyone, it’s allowed recruits that have never known each other except for their Rivals profile and rating to become cyber-friends, members of the same elite club that instantly creates a bond that not many people can understand.

You might be too old to remember, but peer pressure in high school was a very real thing. After months of hearing from coaches and reporters pushing an agenda, talking with someone living in the exact same fishbowl helps you form an immediate kinship, and gives coaches and schools a line into the subconscious that would have the characters from Inception jealous.

Just over two weeks ago, Ronald Darby was firmly committed to the Irish, brushing off the questions coming at him from Rivals’ Mike Farrell when asked about his plans for college. But take Darby out of the Chesapeake Bowl, bring him down to Orlando where factions of players heading west to California or to the SEC, and you begin to see how easy it is for a kid that’s long been considered wobbly in his commitment to Notre Dame to get confused and open things up. Say what you want about an ace recruiter like Tosh Lupoi at Cal, but watching a guys like Bryce Treggs continually push Cal in the social media world (even while visiting Notre Dame), and then watching Shaq Thompson’s commitment lead to guys like Jordan Payton, and that’s how momentum gets rolling.

Notre Dame will rarely be the hometown favorite, simply because of geography, but its name also gets them in the door in just about every state across the country. While the swirling winds of recruiting seem to be blowing against Notre Dame’s efforts, three weeks also give the Irish the opportunity to let the excitement and mob mentality of these all-star games fizzle, and the idea of making a lifetime decision like picking a college take over.

In truth, nobody knows what’s going to happen with Darby until one lucky fax machine has a letter-of-intent roll in that first Wednesday of February. While these eleventh hour jitters (now currently effecting Taylor Decker, though for obviously different reasons) have fans wondering what coaches did wrong, sometimes it’s something as old-fashioned as peer pressure.

You might tend to forget it after following these blue-chippers’ every move, but they still just are kids.