Tag: Sports Illustrated

Manti Te'o SI

Te’o earns his way onto the cover of Sports Illustrated


The issue should have arrived in mailboxes around the country yesterday, with Sports Illustrated featuring Manti Te’o on the cover of thousands of magazines. It’s the first time Notre Dame has been featured on the front since 2006, when Brady Quinn, Tommy Zbikowski, and Travis Thomas were on the cover of the college football preview issue.

Teo’s regional cover was sent to the majority of the Midwest, hitting all of Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota, eastern Missouri, Ohio and parts of Canada. (The rest of the country got the Baltimore Orioles, and an issue featuring sports in the Nation’s capital.)

The profile on Te’o, written by former New York Times writer Pete Thamel is a wonderful read, and while it doesn’t uncover anything particularly new on Te’o or his journey to South Bend, it’s a terrific reminder that Notre Dame landed a transcendent defensive player that has perfectly bridged the gap between the past and the present.

Te’o has more than done his part in the locker room, embodying the Hawaiian traits of humility and family. He is delighted that his teammates now refer to each other as uce—Samoan slang for bro—and relish the meaning of the word. Te’o and Toma, his roommate and fellow Punahou alum, invite teammates over for dinners of Spam and eggs— “that is my weakness, Spam and Pam,” Te’o says with a laugh— and host games of spades nearly every night. “There’s just more of a closeness with this team,” says Toma, one of the Irish’s most reliable wide receivers. “We’re actually having fun again.”

Te’o’s leadership by example reached a high point when he decided to forgo first-round NFL money and return to South Bend for his senior year. One presentation he sat through with his parents, Brian and Ottilia, showed that staying in school could cost Manti $4 million. Brian and Ottilia are both in education, and Manti is the oldest of their seven children. (One brother, Brian Jr., passed away at three months old.) “We had never seen that many commas before,” Brian says.

Manti’s reasons for returning will inevitably be used as an Irish recruiting pitch for years to come. He told students at a pep rally at Dillon Hall, “You’re the reason I’m coming back.” Te’o also wanted something else: to experience Senior Day with his parents. At the end of his junior season, he watched as Steve Filer, a five-star linebacker who never panned out and tore his ACL as a senior, took the field for the last time. “I saw Steve crutch out there and the joy that his parents had in their eyes,” he says. “That’s when I realized, ‘Mom and Dad, it doesn’t matter. I want to share that with you.’”

While rumblings of a Heisman Trophy campaign have started on the internet, there’s no current plan for Notre Dame to start one. (Of course, Te’o’s play on the field might do the sports information department’s job for them.) Still, if there’s any question how good of a football player Te’o has become this season, defensive coordinator Bob Diaco let his opinion be known yesterday.

“Manti’s the finest football player in America, all positions, all teams in college,” Diaco said. “And he’s the best football player that I’ve personally coached.”

2011 vs. 2006: Avoiding the pitfalls of great expectations


It’s human nature to want to paint with a wide brush. You cover more ground, get your point across quicker, and it’s far more enjoyable to slap a roller across a wall than deal with the tiny corner of trim that you need to cover with blue tape and wrench your back to get just right.

But when it comes to Notre Dame football, it seems most outside the influence of the Golden Dome are happy to roll away, convinced that a wide swath of color will be enough to get people nodding in agreement.

The always excellent Spencer Hall wrote about the true horror of “Notre Dame and Possible Competence.” It’s an excellent read, and as usual will make you chuckle mightily in between the flashbacks that make you grab a pillow and burrow your head.

Here’s a quick snippet to help you get Spencer/Orson’s flavor, while also getting a pretty firm grasp on the angle Hall is taking:

We realize an entire generation of football fans have grown up to maturity (or at least as close as you’ll ever get to maturity) without Notre Dame being “good.” They have seen spikes, sure. Tyrone Willingham, a degenerative nerve disease and coach, took Notre Dame to ten wins in 2002.  Charlie Weis, who later went on to work as offensive coordinator for an obscure team in Central America, led the Irish to a 10-2 record in 2006. That season ended with an exhibition against Louisiana State in the Sugar Bowl. Remember the time Charlie Weis tried to out-Les Miles Les Miles? Oh, Charlie.

To squirt the lemon directly in Irish fans’ eyes, he links to ten minutes of LSU running the Irish off the field, a game that made Jamarcus Russell about $40 million more than he deserved.

But that’s not the point of this column. Rather, it’s two-fold: To acknowledge the very weird fascination with people’s willingness to call the Post-Holtz era not just the Dark Ages of Irish football, but to categorize it as abject failure from the day of Bob Davie’s hiring. If you didn’t know any better, the lights have been off since Boston College beat the Irish in late November of 1993.

Of course, it hasn’t been all bad. And it was just five short years ago that Notre Dame was in a position to make a title run, finding a place on the cover of Sports Illustrated and having one of its lead columnists attempt to dispel some myths as he defended the Irish’s No. 1 preseason ranking.

With the Irish sitting at 10-1 after rebounding from a difficult loss to Michigan, those prognositcators didn’t look all that bad. But ugly losses to USC and LSU gave Irish fans a long offseason to think about two brow-beatings, and revisionist history probably makes that Irish team look even worse than in actually was.

As we look at the lofty expectations that are being heaped on the Irish, it makes sense to look back at that 2006 team, and the pitfalls that tripped them up, and see if there could be similar obstacles in the way of this Notre Dame squad.

First off: Take a gander at the SI cover and you’ll have your first clue. No — not the fact that Justin Bieber completely ripped off Brady Quinn’s look, but the fact that Travis Thomas is on the cover. When you’re depending on a converted running back to start at outside linebacker, especially one that’s about 210 pounds, you know that your defense is awfully thin.

While it’s easy to see now, the Irish couldn’t compete in the front seven. Sure, the Irish had BCS level guys like Victor Abiamiri (who might have thrived with a redshirt freshman season) and Trevor Laws (who did), but they also relied on a 270-pound defensive tackle like Derek Landri and defensive ends like Chris Frome and Ronald Talley. At linebacker, Maurice Crum led the team in tackles with Joe Brockington, mostly only a special teams presence, starting nine games for the Irish. Two of the Irish’s top three tacklers were safeties, with Tommy Zbikowski and Chinedum Ndukwe filling up the stat sheet, not necessarily good things.

The Irish got the production it wanted out of its running game, with Darius Walker gaining 1267 yards on five-yards a carry. But Brady Quinn missed the presence of Maurice Stovall and Anthony Fasano, and his yards per attempt went down a steep 1.5 yards per throw as his average yardage went from 326 to 263 per Saturday, with defenses taking away the deep strike that put Jeff Samardzija on the map. It’s an under-discussed topic, but the Irish offense that was so shockingly dangerous through the air in 2005 was largely kept in check when defenses adapted to Weis and his tendencies.

As we turn the focus to 2011, the Irish might actually be most worried about their offense keeping up with the defense, a shocking proposition and something most pundits didn’t think possible at Notre Dame. It’s also interesting to consider that the Irish just went through the growing pains of losing their co-leading receiver like the 2006 team did, when the Irish struggled to adapt to life without Golden Tate last year with Michael Floyd constantly seeing coverages rolled his way.

If you’re looking for a place that the Irish need to pick up the slack offensively, it’s in running the football. There’s no proven depth behind Cierre Wood, but there’s every reason to believe Jonas Gray can be an effective BCS caliber running back, and the offensive line should continue to gel this season.

We’re still over 70 days away from the opening of the 2011 season, far too many to get whipped into a froth just yet. But if Brian Kelly’s offense can make strides in Year Two, and the defense continues to play dominant football, and —

I’ll pump the brakes before this thing gets out of control. We all know how that one goes…

Is SI really jumping on the ND bandwagon?

Kelly Sombrero

Maybe it’s the dearth of college football news after a roller coaster Signing Day, but Stewart Mandel over at SI.com had an incredibly complimentary column about Brian Kelly’s recruiting class and how it could produce a “return to prominence.”

(Apparently, SI is gun shy of using the ol’ “Return to Glory” slogan, too. Can’t say I blame them.)

Mandel, who was burned when he hopped on the Irish bandwagon back in 2006, seemingly had it with picking the Irish to succeed, even supporting a Pat Fitzgerald quote and calling the Northwestern football program on par with the Irish at the tail end of the 2009 season.

The quote of record from Mandel’s piece back then:

“Even though we’re similar academically, we’re in a little different boat as Stanford and Notre Dame,” said Northwestern coach Pat Fitzgerald. “We’ve been consistently winning since 1995. They’re still saying they can do it, but we’re doing it.”

(Major aside: I’ll be the first to chuckle at Fitzgerald’s comments, and I already addressed them head-on back in November ’09. What Northwestern is doing is admirable, but it’s far from a top-flight football program, winning only nine games once since the turn of the century and scheduling absolute patsies in the non-conference portion of their schedule.)

Oh what a difference a coaching change and a recruiting class filled with elite defensive players makes… Almost begrudgingly, Mandel himself turns a blind eye on past recruiting classes filled with offensive blue-chippers and instead looked at the trio of Aaron Lynch, Stephon Tuitt, and Ishaq Williams as proof that Brian Kelly and his coaching staff have put together the pieces needed to bring the Irish football program back into relevance.

Non-Notre Dame fans have every reason to be skeptical of yet another celebrated recruiting class. Several of Weis’ most highly rated signees never came close to meeting the hype, fueling the theory that perhaps Notre Dame five-star recruits are like Duke McDonald’s All-Americans: their status comes with the school.

But there’s reason to believe this class will turn out differently than those before it.

“I think Brian Kelly will coach some of these guys better than Charlie Weis did,” said Scout.com’s Wallace. “He knows how to teach a college player better. He knows how to develop personnel at this level. He turned that team around [last year] and they’re riding momentum.”

Coming off their first eight-win season in four years, it’s not unreasonable to think the Irish could earn a BCS bowl berth in Kelly’s second season. They’ve earned three over the past 13 seasons. Much will depend on the development of whomever wins the quarterback derby, but Notre Dame will surround that player with as many as 18 guys with starting experience, including star receiver Floyd, All-America caliber linebacker Mant’i Teo and fourth-year starting safety Smith.

The difference between the Champs Sports Bowl and the Orange Bowl could come down to whether incoming freshmen like Lynch, Tuitt and Williams (who could become a hybrid linebacker in Diaco’s 3-4 defense) can provide an immediate impact.

“If I didn’t come here knowing I have the chance to start as a freshman, maybe I wouldn’t be [working] as crazy as I am in the weight room,” said early enrollee Lynch. “I’m going crazy because I want to play this year coming up.”

You’d be hard-pressed to find a Notre Dame fan that wasn’t jumping for joy when Charlie Weis inked the mega-recruiting classes of 2006 and 2007, and while there may not be a archive to prove it, I too was too star-crazed to realize the strategic imbalances that plagued those two classes.

That said, while Mandel is pointing to this season’s recruiting successes as a reason why the Irish have a shot to make it to the BCS in Brian Kelly’s second season, he should be pointing to Charlie Weis’ success inking the 2008 recruiting class, which provided starters like Robert Blanton, Braxston Cave, Dayne Crist, Sean Cwynar, Darius Fleming, Michael Floyd, Ethan Johnson, Kapron Lewis-Moore, Trevor Robinson and Jamoris Slaughter to the roster, with intriguing wildcards like Steve Filer and Jonas Gray potentially becoming the difference makers many expected them to be.

Still, with 8 months to go until the Irish actually take the field again, it’s good to see that it isn’t just Irish fans feeling optimistic about the direction of the Irish football program.