Tag: Taylor Dever

South Florida v Notre Dame

Dever looks back at his five years under the dome


For an offensive lineman that was recruited by Charlie Weis, Taylor Dever‘s big break came when Brian Kelly took over the Notre Dame football program. Up until then, Dever was mostly an anonymous tackle, stuck in Sam Young’s shadow, a four-year starter that didn’t give up his job until he graduated and was drafted by the Dallas Cowboys.

While Dever came out of nowhere to most Irish fans when he won the starting right tackle job in Kelly’s first year, his tale is a rather ordinary one at many big BCS programs, where offensive linemen put in years working their way onto the field in special teams before they’re ready to ascend to a starting position as fourth and fifth year players. As Dever looks back on five years and his final regular season game, his hometown newspaper, The Union of Nevada City, had a very nice look at one of the departing members of the Irish offense.

But a knee injury at the Hawaii Bowl following the 2008 season required surgery and created a new set of challenges to overcome. The following year, Taylor continued to persevere through a tough rehabilitation after his injury, serving both on special teams and as a backup to tackle Sam Young. A tough role indeed as Young was a 6-foot-8-inch, 316-pound, four-year starter who now plays for the Buffalo Bills.

In 2010, with Young moving on to the NFL, Dever was poised to assume his role as a starter, but he would have to do so under a new coach.

Brian Kelly replaced Weis as head coach, and Dever liked what he saw. The same was true for Kelly who gave Dever his first career start in the 2010 home opener against Purdue. He got 10 starts and saw action in 11 games at right tackle.

“The biggest difference I see in Brian (Kelly) is his instilling in us that you have got to do all the little things right to win,” Dever said. “We all have bought into that, and once you get so many guys on board that believe in the same thing and want to do all the little things right, you will start winning a lot of games.

“I strongly believe coach Kelly is a great fit here. I believe he can win a national championship here in the next couple years,” he added.

There’s a lot of really thoughtful stuff in this article and it’s certainly worth a read, and it goes to show you just how interesting of a guy Dever is, who sometimes plays an anonymous role on the offensive line. After a career that included three offensive line coaches and two leaders of the program, Dever acknowledge how different it feels knowing he’s run out of the tunnel at Notre Dame Stadium for the last time.

“When you’re in it, it’s slow. It’s tough. You’re always looking for that light at the end of the tunnel,” Dever said of his bumpy career. “When that senior day passes and you don’t get to do it anymore, it is a different feeling.”

First look at contact: Jumping to conclusions edition


After four practices getting acclimated to helmets, the Irish were in full pads today, giving freshman their first real feel of college football. Thanks to the always excellent practice reports courtesy of UND.com, we’re able to get a sneak peak at the first day of work, which allows all of us to jump to some very early conclusions.

Here’s a look at today’s practice report, courtesy of our friends over at UND.com. Because it’s my job to have no life and break down the rodeo drill for everyone, here’s a play-by-play of what you’ll see, helping to isolate some of the match-ups and battles that fly by in just under four minutes.



The first one on one we see (around the :40 second mark) is sophomore tight end Alex Welch welcoming freshman linebacker Ben Councell to to college football, and two mammoth youngsters battling with 6-8, 320-pound Tate Nichols taking on 6-6, 295-pound freshman Stephon Tuitt.

After that, we watch Michael Floyd snatch balls from the jugs machine, Ishaq Williams sprint down in kickoff coverage, and Davaris Daniels work on his hands as well. In snaps from scrimmage, Tate Nichols works at left tackle, where he rides Kona Schwenke outside the pocket. The very next snap, Brad Carrico looks pretty solid battling against veteran Brandon Newman. And for those wondering how Louis Nix would look, that’s him putting Mike Golic on rollerskates. (Golic definitely shouldn’t feel embarrassed, Nix was absolutely dominant in the one-on-one matchups he had, which we’ll get to now.)

For those looking for some rough-and-tumble power football, Let’s go to a frame-by-frame breakdown of the rodeo drill (starting at 1:42), where we’ll reach grand conclusions after watching less than a minute of drills.

1. Braxston Cave vs. Louis Nix. Winner: Nix, who stood up Cave and stuffed freshman Cam McDaniel.
2. Trevor Robinson vs. Carlo Calabrese. Winner: Robinson, who controlled Carlo and pushed him inside while George Atkinson slid by.
3. Ben Koyack vs. Unknown (Zeke Motta?) Winner: Koyack, who planted a defender unknown (I’m guessing Motta after a Zapruder like breakdown), getting a big rise out of his coaches.
4. Brad Carrico vs. Anthony McDonald. Winner: Slight edge to Carrico, who looks pretty fluid at offensive line.
5. Jordan Prestwood vs. Tyler Stockton. Winner: Stockton, who does a nice job getting physical with the freshman.
6. Prestwood vs. Aaron Lynch. Winner: Lynch, who looks every bit the part of a freshman All-American.
7. Prestwood vs. Stephon Tuitt. Winner: Slight edge to Tuitt, as it’s tough to say Prestwood lost that collision.
8. Alex Welch vs. Unknown (Anthony Rabasa?) Winner: Draw. Nice work by both guys, whoever our secret defender is.
9. Welch vs. Steve Filer. Winner: Filer, who taunts Irish fans by reminding people just how physically gifted he is.
10. Nick Martin vs. Joe Schmidt. Winner: Schmidt, who does his best Mike Anello impression, ignoring his physical limitations by blowing up a block making a nice play on Martin.
11. Christian Lombard vs. Lynch. Winner: Lynch, who once again blows up an offensive tackle at the point of contact.
12. Lombard vs. Chase Hounshell. Winner: Lombard, but credit to Hounshell for holding his ground and battling.
13. Taylor Dever vs. Kapron Lewis-Moore. Winner: Dever, who did a nice job engaging KLM, in a rare battle of ones-versus-ones.
14. Mike Golic vs. Louis Nix. Winner: Nix. He’s going to be very tough to move.
15. N. Martin vs. Jarrett Grace. Winner: Draw. A nice collision between two talented freshmen.

While I’d appreciate everybody else sharing their gut reactions below, the two guys that really stood out were Louis Nix and Aaron Lynch. They looked dominating, regardless of who they were facing.


Counting down the Irish: 25-21

Carlo Calabrese

As we kick off our 2011 Irish Top 25, let’s get some things out of the way quickly. This is just a list, not some objective evaluation process. Some guys I had ranked much higher than others. (It worked the other way as well.) Still, what you’ll find here is a pretty good composite projected ranking for players on the 2011 Irish roster.

Of course, lists like this are subjective by definition. I kept the qualifications light and let our panel of “experts” use their own methodology.

Once again, here is our esteemed group of panelists:

Frank Vitovitch of UHND.com
DomerMQ of HerLoyalSons.com
Eric Murtaugh of OneFootDown.com
Matt Mattare of WeNeverGradute.com
Matt & CW of RakesofMallow.com


25. Taylor Dever (OT, Sr.): Dever won the right tackle job last year after seeing limited minutes as a junior and sophomore. The fifth-year senior should anchor the position he started ten games at, missing time with a hamstring injury in the heart of the season. You didn’t hear Dever’s name much last season, a good thing for a right tackle.

Highest ranking: 16th. Lowest ranking: Unranked (3 times)

24. Chris Watt (OG, Jr.): Watt is the presumed replacement for Chris Stewart, and is versatile enough to slide in at center if needed. After redshirting his freshman season, Watt played in all 13 games last season for the Irish, providing depth behind Stewart.

Highest ranking: 12th. Lowest ranking: Unranked (4 times)

23. Zeke Motta (S, Jr.): Thrown into action after an early season injury to Jamoris Slaughter, Motta learned on his feet, playing in all 13 games and starting eight opposite Harrison Smith. His improvement was evident as the season went on, and the rising junior will battle Slaughter for the job across from Smith.

Highest ranking: 19th. Lowest ranking: Unranked (2 times)

22. Aaron Lynch (DE, Fr.): One of the most highly anticipated defensive newcomers in years, Lynch lit the Blue-Gold game on fire with a dynamic performance. While he’ll probably only see the field on passing downs, Lynch has all the potential in the world.

Highest ranking: 16th. Lowest ranking: Unranked (2 times)

21. Carlo Calabrese (LB, Jr.): After sitting out his freshman season, Calabrese won the inside linebacker job opposite Manti Te’o, and started eight games before a hamstring injury took him out. He finished fifth on the team in tackles, sixth in TFLs, and fourth in sacks. He’ll compete for a starting job again this fall.

Highest ranking: 17th. Lowest ranking: 24th.


After looking at the composite list, here are a few questions I had for the panel. I’ll highlight a few answers that I found interesting.

Who did you have sitting at No. 26? Are you reconsidering after looking at everybody else’s lists?

DomerMQ @HerLoyalSons — Crist. had Crist at #26. Or maybe 40th. Or maybe lower. Wherever I had him, he wasn’t 1-25. And I’m actually feeling pretty good about it, having stolen a look at everyone’s 1-25. It went about the way I thought it would.  And I understand the points of view of the other fine members of this council, but, while this team may not be full of 1st-round talent from 1-25, it’s full of a nice bit of depth, and I just couldn’t see clear to move Crist into the top 25 given he was the QB who started in the latest loss to Navy.

Matt @WeNeverGraduate — I was tempted to stick Robby Toma in there somewhere because I think he’s going to be the guy who emerges as the most productive fourth wideout. Sean Cwynar also got some consideration thanks to his rock solid performance filling in for Ian Williams when the senior went down.

Which one of these guys has the highest upside for the season?

Eric @OneFootDown — Out of the guys from the 21-25 range it is most obviously Aaron Lynch, who could jump as many as a dozen spots or more if we were to do this ranking system at the end of the 2011 season. I also think Motta is a good bet to move up a decent amount as well.

Matt @WeNeverGraduate — I’ll tap Zeke Motta for this question. Motta improved by leaps and bounds throughout last season as he logged more and more minutes thanks to Jamoris Slaughter’s injury. He’s a freak athlete and he finally seems to be grasping the position.

Any name you think comes in too low here? Too high?

Frank @UHND — Definitely think Lynch is too low.  I know Kelly tried to downplay Lynch’s Blue-Gold game performance, but it was hard not to be impressed.  With the off-season conditioning and fall camp under his belt, I think Lynch is going to make a big impact from day 1.  No one here really looks too high.  Of the three players here I didn’t have in my rankings – Motta, Watt, and Dever – all of them were right outside of my rankings and I considered all of them right on the cusp so hard to argue with any of them.

CW&MB @RakesofMallow — I cannot shake the images of Zeka Motta’s miserable tackling angles in the 2010 Blue-Gold Game.  Even our walk-on running backs were beating him to the edge because of his lack of basic geometrical knowledge.  He played well enough during the season, but he’s the one guy in this group that I’m not sold on.

What do you think a realistic expectation is for someone that’s judged to be between the 21st and 25th best player on the Irish roster?

Frank @UHND — There are 24 starters on a team (including the kicker and punter) so any player within the top 25 should either be a solid starter or excel at a niche such as kick/punt returning, situational pass rushing, etc.  Of these five players, I expect Jones, Motta, Watt, and Calabrese all to be solid starters and in the case of Jones, Watt, and Motta I think they have the potential to be more than solid.  A guy like Lynch might not start but I fully expect him to be a pass rush specialist that makes several big plays throughout the season.


I’m really surprised that Sean Cwynar isn’t listed in the Top 25. In fact, I think if there’s anything I’m certain of, Sean Cwynar is one of the best 25 football players on Notre Dame’s roster. It isn’t a coincidence that the defense not only didn’t miss a beat when Ian Williams went down, but it actually improved. I’m not saying Cwynar was the key to the renaissance, but he’s going to be a very good player on the 2011 Irish. I also had Danny Spond at No. 25, and while I can understand why people haven’t started drinking the Kool-Aid yet, I wouldn’t be surprised if Spond turns into a Chad Greenway type of athlete.

Obviously, Aaron Lynch is the guy that could immediately become a top-ten player on this roster or he’ll be a guy that has some growing pains, likely due to the incredible expectations he helped heap on himself. I have a feeling he’ll be slowly eased into the process, but will make his presence felt early and often in pass-rushing downs. But don’t forget Stephon Tuitt, who didn’t enroll early, but is physically ready to play September 3rd.

Lastly, Carlo Calabrese is at an interesting inflection point. His injury derailed expectations after an impressive redshirt freshman campaign. We’ll find out if he’s ready to become an impact linebacker or a guy that makes plays because he’s lined up next to Manti Te’o.



Six players officially applying for fifth year

Harrison Smith
1 Comment

After weeks of guesswork and number-crunching, Notre Dame announced the members of the football team that will officially apply for a fifth year of school. The six members of the roster are:

Harrison Smith, Safety
Gary Gray, Cornerback
David Ruffer, Kicker
Taylor Dever, Tackle
Andrew Nuss, Guard
Mike Ragone, Tight End

We already knew that Ruffer was getting a scholarship and Smith being named a captain all but confirmed those two returning. The same logic applied to returning starters Gray and Dever, two front-line players that had a season of eligibility remaining. But the decision to bring back Ragone and Nuss, two veteran reserves, were the only wildcards left on the board.

Head coach Brian Kelly announced last week that all ten seniors that had a season of eligibility available would formally apply, but kicker Brandon Walker, defensive end Emeka Nwankwo, linebacker Steve Paskorz and offensive tackle Matt Romine will not return next season. Of those seniors, only Romine played significant minutes, filling in when Dever went down with an injury late in the season.

There’s still a chance — a very small one — that the players applying won’t actually return for another season, but it’s incredibly remote. Rather, the finalization of an 85-man roster has all but taken place, with the final few spots likely to be determined by the final recruits waiting to make a decision next Wednesday.

As it stands now, with five recruits enrolled, 18 more committed and three still in play (Troy Niklas, Savon Huggins, and Bryce Haynes) the Irish are one scholarship over the 85-man limit, a situation that will likely be remedied by the start of fall camp.