Torii Hunter Jr.

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Concussion to keep Torii Hunter Jr. out against Nevada

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Torii Hunter Jr. won’t play against Nevada. The senior wide receiver, concussed against Texas when he was hit in the end zone on a controversial head-high tackle, will sit out the home opener. Brian Kelly made the announcement at Friday evening’s pep rally, multiple outlets reported.

The loss of Hunter removes Notre Dame’s only returning starts at the position before last week. Without him, Brian Kelly will likely call on junior Corey Holmes, who’ll share time at the X position with true freshman Kevin Stepherson. Equanimeous St. Brown and C.J. Sanders are also set to start, each the second of their career.

Kelly talked earlier this week about getting Holmes ready to go, in case Hunter wouldn’t play. Hunter was held the senior captain out of practice with the team’s concussion protocol until Friday, giving Hunter the ultimate decision as to whether he felt up to playing.

Taking another week to get healthy before Michigan State comes to town might be a factor as well. But that didn’t stop Hunter from speaking at the pep rally outside of the Rock on campus.

WNDU’s Angelo Di Carlo caught Hunter’s comments to the home crowd:

“As you all know, I took a pretty big shot last week,” Hunter said at the pep rally. “I took a pretty good shot last week. He caught me slipping. He didn’t want to see me face-to-face. He caught me slipping. I’ll be back. I’m working on it. i’m working on coming back. Just like this team, we got knocked down last week but we are glad to be back in front of the greatest fan base in the United States.”

“We are excited to be back at home and play in front of our home fans and whoop some butt [Saturday] and take some names.”

DeShone Kizer will lead the Irish offense, now working with an entire unit of inexperienced receivers.

Hunter, McGlinchey, Onwualu and Rochell named Notre Dame captains

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Brian Kelly named Notre Dame’s captains for the 2016 team. Seniors Torii Hunter Jr., Mike McGlinchey, James Onwualu and Isaac Rochell will officially lead the team.

Kelly made the news public on Wednesday after practice, his first media availability since the arrest of six players in two separate incidents on Friday evening. And in his four selections, Kelly named four new team leaders after having to replace all five of the team’s captains from last season.

In Hunter, Kelly has named the team’s lone veteran receiver as a captain, expecting a breakout season in both production and leadership. The most experienced returner after three starters departed and Corey Robinson retired due to concussions, Hunter has less starts at the position than fellow captain Onwualu—now a linebacker—Kelly quipped.

McGlinchey carries the torch for the offensive line, a fourth-year senior who’ll have a chance to play his way into a first-round draft pick or return for a fifth year. After Zack and Nick Martin each wore the ‘C’ for two-straight seasons, McGlinchey will carry that leadership forward.

James Onwualu is the lone remaining starter for the Irish at linebacker, replacing both Joe Schmidt and Jaylon Smith as a captain. Onwualu has earned positive reviews for his play on-field as the team’s Sam linebacker, and has always stood out for his lead-from-the-front attitude.

Rochell is the rock of the defensive line, a third-year starter who replaces Sheldon Day as the group’s leader. He’ll be joined by Jarron Jones as veteran contributors in a group that also replaces key starter Romeo Okwara.

 

Counting Down the Irish: 2016’s Top Five

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We’ve reached the top of the roster on Brian Kelly’s seventh team. And while it is no match for last season’s star-studded top five, this group has a chance to put together a tremendous season—and all but one of them have a season (or more) of eligibility remaining.

That’s the rub with this football team. As Brian Kelly explained in his introductory remarks heading into training camp, there’s no shortage of talent on this roster, but they’ll need to grow up quickly and prove that they can do the ordinary things right.

While the top of the heap had some consensus, there were still some wildly different evaluations out there. And you can validate any opinion at this point, just because the top three players on this list all have just one year of starting experience.

Young teams can certainly win football games. But they’ll need to come together quickly. As we move beyond prognosticating, it’ll be interesting to see if this roster—and the panel’s selections— plays to our expectation or if they can exceed it.

 

2016 Irish Top 25 Rankings
25. Equanimeous St. Brown (WR, Soph.)
24. Durham Smythe (TE, Sr.
23. Justin Yoon, (K, Soph.)
22. Tyler Newsome (P, Jr.)
21. Daniel Cage (DT, Jr.)
20. Sam Mustipher (C, Jr.)
19. Jerry Tillery (DT, Soph.)
18. Max Redfield (S, Sr.)
17. CJ Sanders (WR, Soph.)
16. Drue Tranquill (S, Jr.)
15. James Onwualu (OLB, Sr.)

14. Alex Bars (RT, Jr.)
13. Alizé Jones (TE, Soph.)
12. Shaun Crawford (DB, Soph.)
11. Nyles Morgan (LB, Jr.)
10. Tarean Folston (RB, Sr.)
9. Jarron Jones (DT, GS)
8. Josh Adams (RB, Soph.)
7. Cole Luke (CB, Sr.)
6. Malik Zaire (QB, Sr.)

 

PHILADELPHIA, PA - OCTOBER 31: Torii Hunter Jr. #16 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish catches a pass and is tackled by Avery Williams #2 of the Temple Owls on October 31, 2015 at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Notre Dame Fighting Irish defeated the Temple Owls 24-20. (Photo by Mitchell Leff/Getty Images)

5. Torii Hunter Jr. (WR, Senior): The only regular returning to the receiving corps, Hunter will be the primary target for Notre Dame’s still-to-be-determined starting quarterback. A smooth athlete with better than advertised speed, Hunter has taken his time developing in the program, with injuries setting him back in two different seasons.

With his baseball career on hold for the time being, Hunter is all about football. And he’ll have every chance to be force-fed the ball this season, with the receiving corps as top heavy as we’ve seen it, especially when it comes to experience.

Hunter isn’t Michael Floyd, Will Fuller or Golden Tate. But he could be senior-season TJ Jones, a versatile playmaker who can bounce around the field and do a little bit of everything. That seems to be the bar we’ve set with Hunter in the top five, mostly based on reputation and a strong spring.

Highest Rank: 3rd. Lowest Rank: 10th.

 

Keenan Reynolds, Isaac Rochell

4. Isaac Rochell (DE, Senior): One of the ironmen of the roster, Rochell led the defensive line in snaps and put together a rock-solid junior season at strong side defensive end. Entering his final year of eligibility, Rochell is healthy and capable of playing just about anywhere, a candidate to move both inside and out.

Rochell has ascended into Sheldon Day’s leadership role, a likely captain as the 2016 squad evolves. If he’s able to turn in Day’s performance wreaking havoc behind the line of scrimmage, the Irish have an intriguing NFL prospect who could have a long football career ahead of him.

A stout run defender who will be difficult to move off the point of attack, Rochell needs to improve as a pass rusher, finding a way to impact the game by getting to the quarterback. If he can add that element to his repertoire, he could have a special season.

Highest Rank: 2nd. Lowest Rank: 11th.

 

SOUTH BEND, IN - OCTOBER 17: Quenton Nelson #56 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish celebrates after a 10-yard touchdown reception by Corey Robinson against the USC Trojans in the fourth quarter of the game at Notre Dame Stadium on October 17, 2015 in South Bend, Indiana. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

3. Quenton Nelson (LG, Junior): In just 11 starters, Quenton Nelson has established himself as one of college football’s top guards. A big, strong and long player, Nelson’s got the physical gifts of a tackle and the nasty demeanor of a lineman built for the inside of the trenches.

One of the most powerful run blockers in the country, Nelson will only improve in all facets of the game as he enters his second season in the starting lineup. Lined up next to Mike McGlinchey, the duo might be one of the most physically imposing in all of college football—650 pounds of granite that should protect quarterbacks and power the ground game.

Highest Rank: 2nd. Lowest Rank: 7th.

 

DeShoneKizer

2. DeShone Kizer (QB, Junior): It’s staggering to think that at this time last season, not a single vote was cast for DeShone Kizer. (A sampling of those that received votes: Incoming transfer Avery Sebastian, Nick Watkins, true freshman Justin Yoon and redshirt Jay Hayes.)

What a difference a year makes. Kizer very nearly topped our list, the smallest variance of any player in the eyes of the panel.

Kizer does everything a quarterback should do in a Brian Kelly offense—and has a few other traits that feel like the cherry on top. With the size of a prototype NFL player and the skills of a zone-read runner, Kizer’s offseason was likely spent preparing for a camp competition with Malik Zaire that both players think they’ll win.

At his best, Kizer has the upside of an NFL starter. And with another season under his belt, there’s only room for improvement after seeing and doing things for the very first time in 2015. Two of Notre Dame’s best players are quarterbacks. It’s a tough problem to have, but one every coach would kill for.

Highest Rank: 1st. Lowest Rank: 4th.

 

McGlinchey

1. Mike McGlinchey (LT, Senior): After producing two-straight first round left tackles, the Irish have a third in McGlinchey. While he’s only a second-year starter, McGlinchey came into the preseason viewed as one of college football’s premier talents, understandable when you dig deeper into his performance last season—not to mention just look at him.

McGlinchey was born to be an offensive tackle, and physically he might be the most gifted we’ve seen in recent years. While he’ll be seeing and doing things for the first time, he’s talented enough to use his extraordinary physical gifts to dominate— long arms, quick feet, and great strength, all in a body that could dominate on the basketball court.

Passed the leadership baton from Martin to Martin, McGlinchey is a near lock to be a team captain. And he has a fifth year of eligibility remaining.

Highest Rank: 1st. Lowest Rank: 13th.

 

***

Our 2016 Irish Top 25 panel:
Keith Arnold, Inside the Irish
Bryan Driskell, Blue & Gold
Matt Freeman, Irish Sports Daily
Nick Ironside, Irish 247
Tyler James, South Bend Tribune
Eric Murtaugh, 18 Stripes
Pete Sampson, Irish Illustrated
Jude Seymour, Her Loyal Sons
JJ Stankevitz, CSN Chicago
John VannieNDNation
Joshua Vowles, One Foot Down
John Walters, Newsweek 

Irish A-to-Z: Torii Hunter Jr.

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Whether by default or not, Notre Dame’s undeniable No. 1 receiver entering fall camp is Torii Hunter Jr. The rising senior, healthy after injuries and primed for a breakout with a depth-chart evacuation, is now centerstage after fighting for snaps the past two seasons.

What that means remains to be seen. Most have Hunter pegged for a monster season. One listen to Brian Kelly or his offensive assistants, and you’ll likely feel the same way. Hunter has the speed to get deep, the moves to play in the slot, and the football IQ and feel for the game that made him an emergency defensive back last season.

But it’s still just a projection. His days of moonlighting are over—not just at defensive back, but on the baseball diamond at Eck Stadium. Because 2016 is about Hunter elevating his profile on the football field. He’s one of the keys to a big Notre Dame season.

 

TORII HUNTER JR.
6’0″, 190 lbs.
Senior, No. 16, WR

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

A four-star recruit and U.S. Army All-American. The MVP of The Opening. Hunter chose Notre Dame in September, picking the Irish over Arizona, Arkansas, Nebraska and Oklahoma.

A U.S. Army-All American, Hunter broke his femur during practice the week of the game, costing him an entire season as his rehab suffered a few false starts.

 

PLAYING CAREER

Freshman Season (2013): Did not see action, recovering from injury suffered at U.S. Army All-American game.

Sophomore Season (2014): Named Notre Dame’s Offensive Newcomer of the Year. Played in 10 games, missing the opening three due to a groin injury. Had seven catches for 65 yards and a touchdown, scoring against Syracuse.

Junior Season (2015): Made 28 catches for 363 yards, scoring two touchdowns. Also carried the ball five times for a total 16 yards. Completed one of three passing attempts.

 

WHAT WE SAID LAST YEAR

Seems pretty close, though I undersold him. I still had Prosise as a part-time slot receiver and Corey Robinson as a healthy and productive receiving option.

I’m high on Hunter, though I still put his ceiling at 20 catches. In reality, unless the Irish are an insanely productive offense, I’m just struggling to find the footballs to make Hunter happy, especially when he’s probably the fifth-best option as a pass catcher.

(That’s no insult, Will Fuller, Corey Robinson, Chris Brown and C.J. Prosise are all really good players.)

A redshirt season was a great thing for him. He’s basically a sophomore at this point, meaning there’s plenty of time for him to work his way up a depth chart that is pretty top-heavy right now.

We’ve heard about Hunter’s ability to make plays in space and be a versatile receiver. And he’s got the versatility to play inside and out, something that always helps when you’re looking for ways to get a player noticed.

New offensive coordinator Mike Sanford will likely see some of the same things this August that had Kelly and Mike Denbrock excited. It’d be even better if we saw those things happen on Saturdays this fall, instead of making most of his noise on the practice field.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

There’s nobody in the way of Hunter maximizing his potential now. Combine his experience and knowledge of the offense with a fleet of young and still-learning receivers and every arrow points to a big season.

Still, some of the same challenges confront Hunter that we mentioned for Corey Holmes. Namely size and speed—a lack of size combined with very good (but not elite) speed. Again, Will Fuller can get away with being small because he’s one of the fastest football players on the planet. We’ll see if Hunter has that same ability sooner than later.

I’m not down on Hunter’s ceiling—in fact, I think he’s probably the skill player with the best chance of being named the team’s offensive player of the year (non-QB edition). But it’ll require Hunter’s explosiveness to take a jump forward, because it’s not enough to just be reliable and versatile in this offense.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

I think Hunter is Notre Dame’s best bet at a 1,000 yard receiver this year. But he’ll need to prove that he’s capable of making the big play, because he’s not going to get there averaging just 13 yards a catch (he’d need 77 catches at that pace).

He showed flashes of that ability—especially getting downfield in the Blue-Gold game—this spring. And without Will Fuller to take those deep ball targets, Hunter’s speed and hands are a nice option at the X, especially if Corey Holmes is going to spend some time on the inside.

Hunter’s versatility makes him a key piece of the offensive puzzle. But after listening to Kelly this spring, it sure sounds like this is a coaching staff that wants to find a determined role for Hunter, if only to give him the opportunity to thrive.

Hunter has a fifth year of eligibility available. But Kelly made it seem as if that fifth-year might not be needed before heading to the next level. If that’s the case, expect a big season from the new No. 1.

 

2016’s Irish A-to-Z
Josh Adams
Josh Barajas
Alex Bars
Asmar Bilal
Hunter Bivin
Grant Blankenship
Jonathan Bonner
Ian Book
Parker Boudreaux
Miles Boykin
Justin Brent
Devin Butler
Jimmy Byrne
Daniel Cage
Chase Claypool
Nick Coleman
Te’von Coney
Shaun Crawford
Scott Daly
Micah Dew-Treadway
Liam Eichenberg
Jalen Elliott
Nicco Feritta
Tarean Folston
Mark Harrell
Daelin Hayes
Jay Hayes
Tristen Hoge
Corey Holmes

 

Torii Hunter Jr. drafted by Angels in 23rd round

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Notre Dame’s presumptive No. 1 wide receiver was given some props for his baseball skills on Saturday. Torii Hunter Jr. was selected by the Los Angeles Angels on Saturday, a 23rd round pick in the MLB draft.

Hunter is a reserve outfielder on the Irish baseball team, playing sporadically for Mik Aoki. In 19 games this season, Hunter hit just .182, though flashed a nice glove and stole two bases in as many attempts. He balanced baseball with a football career that came first, even during spring practice.

The pick came from a team that had Torii Hunter Sr. roaming centerfield through the prime of his career. The Angels actually had their former centerfielder announce the pick Saturday afternoon, surely a special moment for father and son. The pick came a round before the Mariners drafted Trey Griffey (son of Ken), a receiver at Arizona, who hadn’t played baseball since high school.

Like the pick of Griffey, Hunter’s selection was likely more ceremonial than a bet on his professional future. Hunter was also selected out of high school by the Detroit Tigers, a 36th round pick in 2013.