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Meyer does his best to flip Kraemer


How do you know a Notre Dame recruit is a good one? Because Urban Meyer wants him.

And while the Irish’s 2016 recruiting class has yet to fully hit its stride, two offensive linemen—blue-chippers Tommy Kraemer and Liam Eichenberg—had offers and major interest from Meyer and hometown program Ohio State, only to choose Notre Dame.

But nobody expects Meyer to quit after a commitment. And it sounds like the Ohio State coaching staff is doubling-down its efforts to flip Kraemer. The good news for Irish fans? It doesn’t sound like Kraemer is budging.

After earning an invitation to The Opening, Cleveland.com caught up with Kraemer, and asked about the Buckeyes’ pursuit.

“Coach (Kerry) Coombs called me last week and was at the school last week,” Kraemer told Cleveland.com. “They have not stopped. Coach Coombs said they aren’t going to stop until I sign, so I’ll take it as it is and focus on Notre Dame.”



Kraemer is a recruit worth chasing. He just earned rave reviews at the Columbus Regional Camp. One of the top prospects in the country, he’s already committed to the U.S. Army All-American game.

247 Sports views him as a 5-star prospect. Rivals views him as the 31st best player in the country. And he’s a key building block for the Irish at tackle, a position that needs restocking this February.

In days past, Meyer served as one of the ultimate thorns in the side of Notre Dame, routinely plucking top players from Charlie Weis’ recruiting classes when he was at Florida. And while Meyer managed to pull away Taylor Decker (who has turned into an excellent tackle for the Buckeyes), Brian Kelly has more than held his own against Ohio State, especially along the offensive line.

And while Ohio State would like to add Kraemer to former Irish assistant Ed Warinner‘s depth chart, Kraemer plans to honor his pledge to Notre Dame, taking pride in his decision.

“I am very happy with Notre Dame and I love it there. I knew when I first visited that was the place for me, and I’ve never looked back since,” Kraemer told Cleveland.com. “I take pride in the fact that one of the top players in Ohio is going to Notre Dame over Ohio State.

“I think it shows that they still have that recruiting tie in Ohio and can keep it going.”



Midwest recruiting scene just got a little more crowded


Way back in June, we took a look at the lay of the land in the Midwest, and noticed how the recruiting world might be shifting a bit. Back then, big news was that Russell Wilson — given his walking papers by North Carolina State coach Tom O’Brien — was signing on the dotted line with Wisconsin. (A story that I was credited for breaking, even though that wasn’t 100 percent my intent to be completely honest.)

Well, with Urban Meyer taking the head coaching job at Ohio State, and all the changes at Penn State, it’s time to take another look back at what’s gone on in less than five months. Let’s just say it’s been substantial.

Let’s check in across the Midwestern powers and see what’s happened since June.


Here’s what I said then:

Where the Buckeyes go is anyone’s guess, but it’ll be with an interim head coach, an athletic director that isn’t likely to survive the rather large magnifying glass that peers over his department, and a flagship program that’s unraveling faster than twine down stairs.

A very realistic outcome is something along the lines of USC — and maybe worse — but drastic scholarship reductions are coming soon, which lessens the chance of a coach like Urban Meyer taking over the program, something that’d put a tourniquet on the blood that’s being shed.

Still, on field results still trump stability and until the Buckeyes prove they’ve lost it, it’s hard to catapult an Irish football program that’s just a year removed from its own coaching transition in front of one of college football’s perennial powers.
Verdict: Irish still in rearview mirror, but the passing lane is only a season or two ahead.

Well, it turns out that $40 million is worth more than worrying about NCAA sanctions, which seem closer to a slap on the wrist than an anvil being dropped on the Buckeyes. After one year with his family and tending to his health, Meyer is back in coaching and taking over Ohio State, at what looks to be another one of his “dream jobs.” (In his defense, I’ve got multiple dream jobs, too. If only the Twins were looking for a over-the-hill shortstop that can’t hit that moonlights as a million-dollar screenwriter and Naval Aviator.)

Meyer’s return to college football will make the state of Ohio much more competitive and he’ll also be recruiting a similar type of offensive athlete as Brian Kelly. He also might be making a sales pitch to one of the Irish’s coaches, with running backs coach Tim Hinton getting a lot of attention in the media as someone that might join the new Buckeyes staff.

Hinton’s brother Steve, a high school coach in the area, talked to the Lancaster Eagle Gazette about the opportunity to head back to Ohio State.

“Whenever Urban has gone to be a head coach, he has offered Tim jobs,” Steve Hinton said. “(Tim) had young kids and didn’t want to move for that reason. I know Tim and Urban talk throughout the year, and that they had a really good working relationship.”

Steve Hinton was unsure whether his younger brother would accept an Ohio State position under Meyer if he was pursued.

“It would be a tough decision to stay or to come home, especially because he loves Notre Dame and the atmosphere that’s there,” Steve Hinton said. “As a brother, I would love for him to come home, but I would understand if he stayed at Notre Dame.”

There has been no noise out of South Bend on Hinton leaving and he’s been visiting recruits this week and also has plans to stay on the trail into next week as well, according to several reports. Still, Hinton’s work with the running backs has been tough to ignore, and if he decides to join Meyer’s staff in what amounts to a horizontal move, it’ll be a tough loss to a unit that is in desperate need of coaching this offseason.


Here’s what I said then:

Remember when rival fan’s took to spelling Lloyd Carr’s name with three Ls, almost belittling the coach’s inability to win more than eight or nine games? That level of “mediocrity” wasn’t good enough for Michigan brass so they brought in West Virginia head coach Rich Rodriguez to kick-start a program that was still one of college football’s elite. Three loses became three wins and Rodriguez was never able to put together a defense that could withstand the Big Ten schedule, nor an offense that could make up for it.

After three turbulent seasons, Rodriguez is gone and Jim Harbaugh didn’t come to Ann Arbor. In his place, Brady Hoke, who has successfully played the “wake up the echoes” card that tends to work well amongst proud football programs.

The Wolverines staff has taken dead aim at reclaiming Midwestern recruits and the message has been well received. Still, Hoke’s new offensive system could detract from the one strength Michigan had last year — a potent spread offense that ran Denard Robinson into the ground.
Verdict: For as bad as the Rich Rod era was, he still took 2 of 3 from ND. Dead heat, with this season’s match-up the likely tie-breaker.

That Hoke won ten games, including victories over Notre Dame and more importantly Ohio State has to have Wolverines fans ecstatic. Defensive coordinator Greg Mattison transformed one of the worst defenses in school history into a statistically impressive group, and even while it was with a lot of smoke and mirrors, ten wins is ten wins.

Offensively, the transition to a pro set was a work in progress, with Denard Robinson still the team’s leading rusher and ball carrier. And while getting the losing streak off their back was nice, there’s got to be some sense of agony knowing that even in the Buckeyes worse moment, they still nearly had Michigan, with freshman quarterback Braxton Miller missing a wide open receiver streaking to the end zone near the end of the game. Now enter Urban Meyer, the perfect coach for Miller’s skillset.

With a recruiting class 23 deep — including 14 recruits that profile on the defensive side of the ball — Hoke and Mattison know they haven’t fixed anything yet. More impressively, the Michigan staff is doing their best to put a fence around the Midwest, with 17 recruits from Ohio and Michigan.


Here’s what I said then:

The Nittany Lions might not be that close geographically, but with Penn State in the Big Ten, they’ll always be considered Irish contemporaries. Call it a rite of autumn, but one of these years is going to be Joe Paterno’s last in State College, and when that happens, the fertile recruiting grounds of Pennsylvania and the Northeast should open up.
Verdict: The program may not be what it used to, but JoePa still has his pick of the region.

Obviously, nobody could have seen something like what’s happened coming, and Nittany Lion football will never be the same. Penn State is without a head coach, without any clear idea (or precedent) what the NCAA will do, and the damage Jerry Sandusky (and his enablers) did to the school is immeasurable.

From a pure football point of view, without a head coach, there’s no telling what this will do to the football program and recruiting. Right now names like Charlie Strong, Dan Mullen, Chris Petersen, Mike London, Al Golden, James Franklin and Pat Fitzgerald are being circulated as targets by Penn State websites. Not to say they’re dreaming, but stepping into Happy Valley right now is more than just taking a new job.

The Lions have 15 recruits on board currently, with names like Armani Reeves and Tommy Schutt familiar to Irish fans. Notre Dame wasn’t ready to accept Schutt’s commitment earlier this season when he was ready to give it. They’d likely take Reeves, though he said back in early November that he was 100 percent committed to Penn State.


Mattison has seen both sides of the UM-ND rivalry

Greg Mattison

Saturday isn’t just another game for Michigan defensive coordinator Greg Mattison.

“I know it’s a huge rivalry for everybody involved in it,” Mattison said. “It’s Michigan. It’s Notre Dame.”

He knows because he’s spent eight years on the opposite sideline, coordinating the Irish defense under Bob Davie and then staying on staff under Tyrone Willingham to coach the defensive line.

“I had a great 8 years there,” Mattison recalled. “I got to see my family through school and my daughter in college, so that made it a really good deal.”

Mattison left Notre Dame when the Willingham era ended, landing with Urban Meyer in Gainesville, part of a coaching staff filled with Davie lieutenants. From there, he became a perennial thorn in Irish fan’s side, winning several one-on-one battles for high-profile recruits, and drawing the ire of Irish fans by allegedly using some negative tactics about all things under the Golden Dome to win.

Mattison’s three year run at Florida was a successful one, but he jumped to the NFL to join John Harbaugh, a friend and coach he’d worked with early in his career under Harbaugh’s father Jack. Mattison ascended to defensive coordinator after Rex Ryan was hired as head coach of the New York Jets.

While Mattison was coordinating one of the NFL’s best defenses, ESPN.com’s Michael Rothstein of Wolverine Nation nicely chronicles Mattison’s unlikely return to the college game, a move he made only because of the man asking.

The NFL taught Mattison more about disguising blitzes and coverages and about how best to pressure the quarterback with schematics. It forced him to become more varied in his playcalling. For the first time, he didn’t have to teach as much as he had to call the right scheme.

“He was a very good coach here,” said safety Tom Zbikowski, who played for Mattison at Notre Dame and with the Ravens. “But with his personality and just him as a human being I think he works very, very well with young men. I think he can relate to them well and be a figure that somebody needs at that time of their life.”

Mattison learned a lot. But his best friend called. He had just been hired as Michigan’s head coach. Did Mattison want to come?

Back to college, back to Michigan, back to Brady Hoke he would go.

Hoke tasked Mattison with fixing a Wolverine defense that had falling apart under Rich Rodriguez. He’s already gotten off to a quick start in his other forte, recruiting, with 15 of the 23 recruits already committed to Michigan set to play defense. Now he’s got to get his defense ready to take on one of their biggest rivals, after it took a few lumps in its debut against Western Michigan.

When Mattison sat down with the media earlier this week, he discussed some of the difficulties his defense had against a Western Michigan unit that played an up-tempo, hurry-up scheme.

“The thing that happen is the kind of thing you worry about happening,” Mattison said about his unit’s opening drive. “When you had so many guys that hadn’t played a lot football you probably had the toughest scenario you could get because it was a very fast pace. They were switching personnel groups in and out without us really being able to decide and see what they were.”

No disrespect to Bill Cubit‘s Broncos, but when Tommy Rees took the helm of the Irish offense after halftime last Saturday, the Irish moved at a tempo that made Western Michigan look like it was running out the clock.

Mattison countered WMU’s early success by bringing pressure, forcing turnovers from the Broncos after it was clear that Michigan couldn’t get to the passer in its base defense.

“We won’t sit back and play zone coverage until we have the ability to get a rush with a four-man front,” Mattison said. “It’s not fair to that secondary or that underneath coverage. If we get in a situation like that we’ll always try to do what’s best for the defense. I’m not going to say I’m a guy that’s going to say he’s going to go out and blitz every down, but when it dictates it, then I think you have to.”

If there’s a situation that dictates it, Saturday evening is it. With Rees moving the offense up and down the field in the second half, Mattison knows he’ll need to protect a secondary that’s still lacking in depth.

If there’s a counter-punch to be had by Brian Kelly and the Irish coaching staff, it’s a running game that can be the biggest offensive asset Notre Dame possesses. Lost in last Saturday’s defeat was Cierre Wood‘s performance, a dynamic effort as a runner, who also made big plays in the passing game as well.

Mattison understands that while Rees, Michael Floyd, and the Irish’s other aerial weapons can hurt Michigan, they’ll need to make sure Wood doesn’t take over the football game.

“We have to be able to stop the run,” Mattison said. “Any time a team runs the football on your defense, you can’t have a great day.”

Brian Kelly made the change to Tommy Rees in large part because he knows Rees is undefeated when he has both a run game and passing attack at his disposal. If the Irish are going to get their season back on track in front of 110,000 fans in Michigan Stadium, they’ll need to have both.

Urban Meyer and ESPN tackle Irish spring football


It turns out Urban Meyer wasn’t just in South Bend to be a featured speaker at the Notre Dame coaching clinic, but he was also wearing his ESPN analyst hat when he visited Brian Kelly and company for spring practice.

Here’s the segment ESPN produced that aired today featuring Meyer, Kelly, HelmetCam, and the epic 3-on-3 battles taking place during these 15 practices.



For all the vitriol that Irish fans have had for Meyer since he chose Gainesville over South Bend, Meyer was incredibly complimentary about the upgraded facilities, the defensive players coming into campus and the momentum the Irish have coming into the 2011 season.

Open practice gives first look at 2011 Irish

Brian Kelly spring ball

With Notre Dame’s star-studded coaching clinic providing an open door to over 1,000 high school coaches, it also gave the media the opportunity to get their first unfiltered look at the 2011 Irish football team.

In a Loftus Center pushing capacity, Brian Kelly and his coaching staff put the team on display for Urban Meyer, Chip Kelly, Green Bay Packers offensive coordinator Joe Philbin, and a host of others. Here are some assorted snippets and thoughts on what people saw. (Disclaimer: I wasn’t there, I’m roughly 11,000 miles away in Beijing right now…)


First, some ugly news. Rising sophomore Cam Roberson looked to suffer a serious knee injury that could knock the running back spring depth chart to some dangerously low levels.

“We didn’t like the way it looked so they’re going to have to send him for an MRI,” Kelly said after practice. “Generally when you get a knee you know if it’s a hyperextension or a bruise. They need to send him for an MRI. I never like hearing that news. We’ll know something probably on Monday.”

Kelly announced there’ll be walk-on tryouts Monday morning at 6 a.m. where a group of brave students will audition to become target practice, protecting Cierre Wood and Jonas Gray from the punishment that comes from having only three true scholarship running backs on campus until freshman Cam McDaniel arrives this summer.


All reports, including his own and his head coach’s, suggest that Dayne Crist has recovered almost fully from a season-ending knee injury. More important than his physical recovery is the comfort he’s feeling in the offensive system during his second spring practice under Kelly and offensive coordinator Charley Molnar.

“I feel I’m moving very well, I’m really happy with the knee,” Crist said. “I’ve had zero issues so far. I’ve had no problems with my knee. I feel great. I’m cleared for everything right now, it’s just I’m weak.”

Crist’s comfort level in the offense was evident to those watching practice, with Dayne’s command of the short passing game in much better shape than it was early last season. If there was a weakness in Crist’s game last year it was his accuracy, where the sporadic nature on the long throws was understandable, but the short, high-percentage throws that he missed because of touch or accuracy problems gave people pause on whether or not he’s the proper trigger man for this offense.

While Chip Kelly and Urban Meyer’s appearance at the coaching clinic got the most publicity, Philbin’s attendance should signal the staff’s interest in establishing some pro-style elements to take advantage of Crist’s skillset and big-time arm. The Packers have been on the cutting edge of NFL offenses the past few years and quarterback Aaron Rodgers certainly is a great prototype for Crist to model his game after — sneaky running ability and athleticism, as well as a big-time throwing arm.


Speaking of quarterbacks, it’s clear that Andrew Hendrix and Everett Golson are still in the beginning stages of their development, with Hendrix throwing a few interceptions during practice, including a pick six by cornerback Lo Wood. Golson also struggled with some throws, not entirely surprising considering he shouldn’t even be thinking about his senior prom yet.

With four quarterbacks and four different skillsets, it makes sense that Kelly decided to unload the running game from Charley Molnar’s plate and focus strictly on the aerial attack. As Kelly intimated today, he and Molnar have worked harder planning their quarterbacks development than they ever have before.

“We have so many things going on, our scripting is so diverse. I’ve never scripted this way before,” Kelly said, talking about the different plays he’s installing for his four different quarterbacks. “I’m script for four quarterbacks. All in all, I like the four quarterbacks that we have. I wanted to work with four. We’re working with four. And I think we’re getting better every day.”


Charlie Weis tended to get credit for being an elite recruiter, and the reputation was for good reason. But if you’re looking for another reason to prefer Kelly’s philosophy for bringing in players, Exhibit A is Kona Schwenke.

Many thought Schwenke was a throw-in player at the end of a class. He didn’t have elite offers, and looked like a long term project when he came to campus as a 6-foot-4, 215-pound slinky. Well, fast-forward around nine months, and the Irish have developed a guy that’s gained 70 pounds and now looks to be a full-time part of the defensive end rotation.

Kelly explained a little bit more about the Hawaiian’s incredible physical development.

“We hit him at the right spurt,” Kelly said. “Obviously Coach Longo has done a great job. And Kona has done a great job more than anybody else in taking care of himself and eating the right way. You can see that he’s a pretty big kid that’s going to help us.”

The inexact science of growth spurts, physical maturity and bodily changes among 17 to 19-year-old kids is pretty well known, and one of the best things that Kelly’s system does is look for body types and molds, as opposed to finding fully developed football players. Schwenke’s rapid development is a great example of a guy that would’ve never been on the radar of the previous regime, but fills an immediate role at a position of need for the Irish.