Weis speaks on the record

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WNDU’s Jeff Jeffers, and a select group of media as close to the Notre Dame football program as any, got the lone sit down with Charlie Weis, spending 90 minutes with Weis earlier today.

WNDU released some of the snippets from the conversation, and it was incredibly candid.

I want Notre
Dame to be successful,” Weis said. “If Notre Dame goes and wins them all next year, everyone could say, ‘now that they’ve got a real coach we can win
games,’ you want to know something, that’s fine by me. Just as long as
these kids here are successful.”


That’s the essential Charlie Weis quote.

Weis holds no animosity toward Notre Dame, the school were he graduated from and spent the past five years as head football coach.

That said, Weis absolutely nailed the biggest problem with the current university administration, and was unabashed in his comments about the ridiculousness of Residence Life, the completely draconian system that runs the disciplinary system at the university. It’s a terrible system whether you’re an athlete or not, and cost the Irish key games from players like Rashon Powers-Neal, Will Yeatman, and Christian Joseph Fauria, great kids who admittedly made mistakes.

Here’s what Weis had to say when asked what the biggest problem on Notre Dame’s campus was:


“Oh,
it’s Residence Life, it’s not even close for second…I didn’t even know Residence
Life existed when I went to school. I think if you took a poll of the
students at Notre Dame on what’s the biggest negative issue, I would
bet at least 50 per cent of them would say Residence Life. Without
getting into the names of people who work at Residence Life, I just think that these are
college kids and college kids do what college kids do. Let’s say a kid
has been too loud because he had some alcohol, why wouldn’t you just
tell him to go to bed? Why would that be something that ends up in the
hands of Residence Life? I’m just saying that boys will be boys and
I’m just defendng them. We as parents know what we interpret with our
own kids what is out of line and we all wish the best but we know our
kids are going to be in trouble in their lifetime. But there are so
many things that I think border on petty.”

As far as I’m concerned, Weis was far too kind with his comments. While nobody has gone officially on the record about what cost Powers-Neal, Yeatman, and Fauria, it’s pretty well known that these indiscretions were penalized to the letter of the law, without using a lick of common sense. Again, this isn’t just a system that penalizes athletes, it penalizes everybody.  

Weis also hit on something that I’ve noticed when covering the Irish this season. Too many members of the media have an agenda when covering the Fighting Irish.

“I don’t think a lot of the media cares about Notre Dame. They care more about their story… The national
guys, they’re very agenda driven as we know. It could be the same story
but it’s about how you portray the story. There’s guys that we all
know that don’t even want to follow Notre Dame. I’ve been able to
fight through the negativity but you know, those 18- to 22-year old kids
that’s tough for them to not feel like this black cloud is hanging over
them all the time. Even when things are going good; the first time you
lose a game — BOOM! — it’s back again or you could win a game and one guy
could play crummy — BOOM! — it’s still there anyway.”


I fully expect media members and commenters to jump on this quote and claim that Weis is making excuses. But this is a very real issue, and something that I’ve noticed throughout the Charlie Weis era at Notre Dame (and the Willingham and Davie eras as well).

You don’t have to be an alum or fan of Notre Dame to cover the Irish. While many writers will claim that any negative comments were merely a product of covering the team objectively, Weis isn’t filled with sour grapes. I completely agree with Weis’ sentiments. Even back after the Michigan loss, it was easy to sense the negative slant that many journalists took when covering the Irish this team. That wasn’t a disappointing loss, it was a piece of evidence used to build a case against Weis and the Irish. Win a close game? They should. Rack up ten wins? Notre Dame should, they play a cupcake schedule. (Nevermind that the schedule ended up in the top 25.)  Nuance and texture are very real elements in media bias.

(Don’t believe me, go read Bernard Goldberg.)

As I said during the late season collapse, the negativity that swirled around the program was an anvil that hung around the players necks, and it was especially weighty when the Irish played the final minutes of a close football game. And when you’ve got three straight weeks of ESPN speculating that your coach is on his way out, that’s something that is hard to avoid.

Weis also talked about the roots his family planted in the Michiana community. Hannah and Friends, Charlie and Maura Weis’ charitable foundation, is headquartered in South Bend. Charlie Jr. is a high school student. The family is very comfortable in the place where they live.

We’re committed
to this community to keep Hannah and Friends working. That’s why we’re
here right now, we’re committed so much that we’re thinking about
retiring in the current house that we have. That’s one of the things
that we’re talking about. Now we might sell it, we might not. Maura and
I have had this conversation because we’re committed to this place
being part of our legacy. It’s really important to us; we’re not
hypocritical when it comes to people with special abilities or
different abilities as Maura would say. We’re gonna make that go
.

I went to Martin’s yesterday. I’m not going into hiding. We went to Yesterday’s for dinner last night because we love the place. We’re going to dinner tonight. We’re not going to go into hiding. Just because we got let go as the football coach at Notre Dame, we’re not going to forget why we’re here.”

People get sick of me complimenting Weis, but these are the reasons why. Regardless of who replaces him, it’ll be tough to find a coach that has a better grasp on Notre Dame than Charlie Weis.

Whether it’s the negatives that come along with ResLife and the media’s scrutiny, or the positive that come along with the special place Notre Dame holds in college football’s fabric, Charlie Weis certainly knows the score, whether he won enough games or not.