Friday notes: Swarbrick, Russ, recruiting and more

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If you’re looking for some insight into the mind of athletic director Jack Swarbrick, the internet has got you covered, as both Eric Hansen and Tim Prister have very good Q&As with the man himself. They are both very much worth the read, but I’ll give you my favorite exchange from each of them:

We’ll start with Eric Hansen’s interview, which covered a wide variety of topics from the official death of 7-4-1 scheduling to Irish envy for the Yankee Stadium Jumbotron.

But here are Swarbrick’s comments on what the new Longhorn Network means for Notre Dame’s future.

Q: Can Notre Dame do the same thing? Will Notre Dame do the same thing at some point?

A: It’s really important for us to expand our media presence. There’s no question. And so I don’t know what form that will take yet.

Texas has geography going for it that Notre Dame doesn’t. So you can sell that into a geograhic region to cable providers, and it works well. We don’t have geography in that sense, so our approach will have to be a little different. But we’re  very excited about exploring ways to do that.

All of the emerging technologies are going to help us. What we have is probably the largest national following, but it’s dispersed. So we’re going to need robust broadband solutions and new forms of deliver of digital media, some of which don’t exist yet but are clearly coming.”

To me, this is absolutely fascinating, and is another great example of how much Swarbrick truly gets the business engine that powers collegiate athletics. Even in-house, Notre Dame has taken huge strides on their online platform, with the work the team at UND.com has done to give all of us better access behind the scenes and at press conferences. But as many of us have talked about, there is a huge opportunity to create a central Notre Dame home online, and from the sounds of it, it’s coming sooner than later.

Prister hasn’t tackled Notre Dame football in his epic three-part interview with Swarbrick, but here’s an exchange I enjoyed.

TP: You didn’t want to be the guy that was AD at Notre Dame when it lost its independence, did you, whether you were painted in the corner or not.

JS: (laughing) I know you won’t believe this, but it’s a little like when I hired Brian (Kelly). People were saying during that process, ‘This hire will define Swarbrick’s legacy.’ The same thing was said about independence.

I’m pretty secure in what I’ve done and what my relationship is here. If the best result for Notre Dame as a university – not as an athletics department but as a university – took us elsewhere, I wouldn’t have had any trouble with that. You just have to look at this from the broad perspective of the university.

People would be amazed that as we were talking internally how little time we spent on an athletics approach to it. Why are we independent? What is the value of independence to us beyond the traditional value? Its principle value is to the broader university, promoting Notre Dame, playing all around the country.

For anybody who was in New York this year at that (Army) game, that’s the power of Notre Dame. Those are the reasons to keep (our independence) because we still think it plays a really important role in the university.

Both guys did a great job and if you’ve got a spare hour or so, dig right in.

***

After 25 years in the training room, Notre Dame legend Jim Russ is moving from taping ankles to a newly created role in the athletic department: Director of Athletic Training and Rehabilitative Services. Here’s more from ND’s official release:

“As we look to create greater structure for the sports performance area, we had a great interest in creating a position that would provide oversight, direction and expertise for our delivery of athletic training and rehabilitative services to our student-athletes,” said Notre Dame athletics director Jack Swarbrick. “Jim is as well-respected as anyone in the country in his field, with nearly 35 years in the business, so he was a natural for this role. While we will miss Jim’s day-to-day focus on football, this move will enable him to apply his background, expertise and professionalism to provide improved guidance for all of our other sports – and Jim will play a critical role in the continuing integration of the various areas that comprise our sports performance division.”

Eleven years ago, I had plenty of opportunities to have my balky right elbow wrapped with ice by Jim and last summer he was right were I found him over decade earlier, this time willing to look at an ankle that didn’t feel quite up to running around in football cleats and full pads.

Notre Dame will look to replace Russ and find a new head football athletic trainer immediately, allowing Kelly to bring in a new — incredibly important — lieutenant to the football program. After a season that saw multiple players plagued with balky hamstrings, I’m guessing the interview process will include a long session on discussing the best way to keep Irish skill players on the field with two healthy legs.

***

Four-star running back Savon Huggins just announced his intent to stay home and play for Greg Schiano’s Rutgers squad, taking one of the final names the Irish are chasing off the big board. (Unless Bob Diaco ends up sitting as Huggins’ kitchen table tomorrow morning before dawn.) As we discussed yesterday, Los Angeles Times lineman of the year Troy Niklas is arriving on campus today, and will make his final decision between USC and Notre Dame by Signing Day.

Niklas would obviously be icing on the cake for a pretty historic front-seven class for the Irish, something Sports Illustrated’s Andy Staples dug into in an article today. While his article talked about the proportion of defensive linemen that hail from the Deep South, it isn’t hard to see why what Notre Dame did pulling guys like Aaron Lynch and Stephon Tuitt out of the area, (not to mention Louis Nix last season) was such an astounding feat.

In related SI news, Stewart Mandel took a look at the glass ceiling that keeps elite kickers rated artificially low in the five-star model that has taken over big-time recruiting.

Four years ago, Auburn signed a top 10 recruiting class that included many of the players who wound up starring for last season’s national championship team: defensive linemen Nick Fairley and Antoine Carter, linebacker Josh Bynes and offensive linemen Lee Ziemba and Ryan Pugh. No player, however, was rated higher at his position than Wes Byrum, Rivals.com’s No. 2 kicker.

Yet the same guy rated so highly in his position group — the same guy who wound up hitting four game-winning field goals during his time at Auburn, including in the BCS title game — was essentially dead weight when it came to the Tigers’ class ranking. Because Byrum was just a three-star recruit in Rivals’ eyes, his mere presence dragged down the average rating for a class with 10 four- and five-star prospects.

Wondering why I’m including this tidbit in today’s links? Well consider this little nugget, something I’ve been wondering since the focus has turned to recruiting rankings.

No one is suggesting that Kyle Brindza, Scout.com’s top-ranked kicker this year, should be rated the No. 1 player in the country, as Henderson was last year. Heck, the Notre Dame commit doesn’t even need to be ranked 100th.

But it would be nice if Brindza at least got that fourth star so that Brian Kelly’s class — currently ranked seventh with a 3.57 star average — isn’t penalized for signing the best player in the country at his position.

Brindza is Kelly’s only two-star recruit according to Rivals, pulling down their overall ranking quite a bit. Take that into consideration when you measure ND’s class against others.

***

Speaking of recruiting, for all those that still were wondering about the whirlwind battle for Stephon Tuitt, here’s where he stands as of yesterday, according to Irish Illustrated.

The five-star defensive end from Monroe, Ga., remains committed to Notre Dame and on Thursday denied a report that he planned to postpone signing his letter-of-intent by a couple days.

To the contrary, Tuitt plans to send his paperwork to South Bend from Austin, Texas, where he will participate in the USA vs. The World game along with fellow Irish commits Josh Atkinson, George Atkinson III, Matt Hegarty and Anthony Rabasa.

“I’m very excited,” Tuitt said. “I get to do it with my future teammates.”

The 6-foot-5, 260-pound prospect put the finishing touches on his commitment during a meeting earlier in the week with Notre Dame defensive coordinator Bob Diaco and defensive line coach Mike Elston.

Among the topics discussed was a potential spring trip back to campus.

“It went well,” Tuitt said. “I got a chance to see about going up to the spring game. A game or a practice. I don’t know which one I’d go to. But I got a chance to talk to (Diaco) about that and see how that was gonna go. Then (we talked) about really how to do the signing and everything.”

I think the Irish coaching staff will breath a huge sigh of relief when Tuitt’s fax comes through The Gug. (Good to see somebody still uses fax machines…)

***

Bonus Jack Swarbrick quote, courtesy of Eric Hansen, who asked about putting field turf into Notre Dame Stadium, after another dreadful season of field conditions on Notre Dame’s natural grass.

“I think there are two issues there. One is I was disappointed in our field this year. It wasn’t where it needed to be and, frankly, that was without any real weather challenges.

“So we’ve got to make sure we get the field to a quality that makes sense. The other is, as the university considers doing more things in the stadium, we have to make sure we keep a natural grass field in the shape we want it to be, graduation being an example. That’s where graduation is held now, in the stadium.

“So it’s a little like Jumbotron, video boards if you will, nothing imminent. But as the use of the stadium evolves – it’s like so many things about this – we’ve got to stay open to new ideas, but maintain the tradition of Notre Dame.”

It’s refreshing to see that the man in charge of Notre Dame athletics acknowledges that the surface in the stadium has been bad. When they ever do anything about it, that’ll be worth following.

Mike Tirico Podcast: Brian Kelly on Notre Dame’s 2016 fall and 2018 rise

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Brian Kelly can very much understand what Dino Babers has done to bring Syracuse to No. 12 in the country. Babers orchestrated that rise along the exact same timetable the Notre Dame head coach made his career on, a timetable that then risked his career, Kelly explained to NBC Sports’ Mike Tirico on his eponymous weekly podcast.

Babers is in his third year leading the Orange, now at 8-2 after back-to-back 4-8 seasons.

“He has stuck with his system and developed his players,” Kelly told Tirico. “These young men are now veterans on the offensive line. He has gone out and brought in some veteran players on the defensive line. He can do some things on the line of scrimmage that he couldn’t before.

“They present a challenge because they can run the football, they can throw it, they’re balanced on offense. … He’s a smart football coach, and he’s developed Syracuse into a winning team.”

While each of Kelly’s first two seasons at Notre Dame matched Babers’ combined wins in his first two with the Orange, it was still Kelly’s third that saw his break through, a la Syracuse currently. That season, as many remember, ended in the BCS national championship game.

This followed a trend for Kelly, going 19-16 in three seasons at Central Michigan before moving to Cincinnati where he went 34-6 before taking over the Irish. That final season with the Bearcats featured the same regular season record Kelly’s third at Notre Dame did, 12-0.

Then, one could say Kelly and the Irish stagnated for three seasons. He had not needed to navigate those years at the FBS-level before.

“Got here and after that third year, really went past that three-year turnaround again and stopped doing the things that I had been doing in the process that I had always stuck with,” Kelly said. “The 4-8 season (in 2016) was a re-awakening of getting back to the things that I had always done and just validates the fact that if I stick with the process and the things that I have always done as a football coach, then we can have success.”

This, along with the general enormity of coaching at Notre Dame and all that comes with it, had Kelly unprepared for the scope of the gig despite being a 19-year head coach when he arrived in South Bend.

“I don’t think I was actually adequately prepared for it,” he said in a moment of candor.

To hear Kelly expound on that list of responsibilities, on recruiting players who fit the University’s culture and on his early career in politics, give Kelly and Tirico a listen via iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher or wherever else you may get your podcasts.

And In That Corner … The No. 12 Syracuse Orange at Yankee Stadium

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Entering the season, Syracuse would have been considered Notre Dame’s sixth-stiffest challenge, at best. This particular space lumped the Orange in as a “should-be win,” designating it as no higher than the eighth-toughest opponent awaiting the Irish.

That was wrong, all very wrong. At No. 12 now, Syracuse was overlooked and as a result, it may not be as well-known as it should be. To rectify that, here comes Stephen Baily of The Post-Standard and Syracuse.com

DF: Stephen, I cannot say I ever anticipated this game being, well, this game. Before we dig in, how long have you been on the Syracuse beat?

SB: I’ve been covering the team since the start of the 2013 season overall and since 2014 for Syracuse.com/The Post-Standard.

At 8-2 and No. 12 in the country, the Orange have put this game on the national radar as much as Notre Dame has. Be honest here — not that you won’t be throughout these answers, but this is the spot where you may have reason to change the past — what did you see as Syracuse’s 2018 ceiling back in the preseason?

Honestly, I would say nine wins in the regular season was the absolute ceiling I envisioned at the start of preseason camp. I did not expect Florida State or Louisville to be this bad and, while the team is markedly improved in important areas, Syracuse has also avoided significant injury and taken advantage of its softest schedule since joining the ACC. I thought the Orange would be better in Year 3 under Dino Babers and predicted 6-6 heading into Week 1.

This may be an unfair way to ask this, as some factors depend upon each other, but what percentage of this year’s top-15 performance would you credit to Babers, to senior quarterback Eric Dungey and to a schedule that has been reasonable, but has yet to feature No. 3 Notre Dame or No. 22 Boston College?

I think the majority of the credit goes to Babers (50 percent) for implementing systems and not only sticking to them, but building a roster and culture around them. Everything that goes into the inner-workings of Syracuse football ties into the mindset of winning football games in shootout fashion. From recruiting to conditioning to defensive emphases, everyone understands the ultimate goal and we’re seeing it all come together in Year 3 with a deeper roster.

I’ll say Dungey (25 percent) and the schedule (25 percent) get an even split of the rest, though it’s admittedly a weird way to divvy up credit as the defensive line and special teams play have been considerable factors in the team’s success this year. Regarding Dungey, he’s had an up-and-down season in which he was benched against North Carolina and nearly lost his job the following week. But the competition brought out the best in him. He looked significantly better passing the ball over the next two weeks, and when he’s trusting the timing of plays and throwing accurately, there isn’t a defense in the country that won’t be kept off-balance. He’s truly a monster in the open field.

The schedule has just worked out perfectly for Syracuse. The Orange caught Florida State on a down year and the absolute rock bottom for Louisville. UConn is trash. Seriously, this is a team that could easily be 10-0 if the defense would’ve been able to get a stop at Clemson and Dungey didn’t miss an overtime throw at Pittsburgh.

Let’s focus on Dungey for a moment. A four-year starter, he has never finished a season. Knock on wood, he may this year, even though a couple weeks ago it looked like he could be benched in favor of sophomore Tommy DeVito. Dungey has completed 60.4 percent of his passes, thrown 14 touchdowns against five interceptions, and averages 219.3 passing yards per game. On top of that, he has rushed for 690 yards and 12 touchdowns. I suppose I have a few questions, so first of all, can you (briefly) explain the DeVito situation from October?

So DeVito is a redshirt freshman who is probably the most decorated recruit of the Babers era — Elite 11, The Opening, Under Armour All-American. He split first-team reps with Dungey during camp and played the majority of the Florida State win after Dungey left with eye irritation. He’s played in about half the games this year, with FSU and North Carolina being the big ones. DeVito threw three TDs to lead Syracuse back against the Tar Heels.

That following week, Babers let the two quarterbacks compete throughout the week and only told them of his decision Saturday just before the North Carolina State game. Dungey looked like a completely different player, throwing for 400 yards and three touchdowns. At Wake Forest the next weekend, he completed 14 straight passes.

It’s pretty clearly Dungey’s job moving forward, but I do believe if Dungey reverts as a passer for more than a few drives, Babers won’t hesitate to turn to DeVito. Like I said, this team is built to win 50-30. If the offense isn’t scoring the ball, that’s a problem. The perceived margin for error is slimmer there than for most teams.

Syracuse senior quarterback Eric Dungey has experience as a four-year starter to go with both rushing and passing skills, making him the most-complete threat Notre Dame’s defense has faced this season. (Photo by Justin Berl/Getty Images)

Would you consider Dungey a true dual-threat quarterback, or is he a pass-first quarterback who happens to be able to run for chunks when available? Presumably, his scrambling played a role in some of his past injuries.

Yes, he’s a dual-threat quarterback. He’s consistently a weapon in the running game. If teams don’t account for him or decide to drop back and try to take away the vertical passing game (see Wake Forest), Dungey will take advantage. He’s bigger than he was in past years and has run over multiple defensive backs this fall. He’ll rack up yardage on designed runs (RPOs, draws and sneaks in short-yardage situations) and scrambling. He’s probably at his best in the scramble game when Syracuse goes with its four- and five-wide sets.

Speaking of such sets, one of Notre Dame’s greatest weaknesses this year is its nickel package. Neither senior Nick Coleman nor freshman Houston Griffith has been able to consistently fill the hole left by Shaun Crawford’s ACL tear. The Irish have survived that deficiency thus far, but they also have not faced an offense with four receivers with 387 yards or more, 28 receptions or more, and each with multiple touchdowns. This is an offense that lost its two leading receivers, and last year’s Nos. 3 and 4 are now Nos. 5 and 6. Where did this group come from? Should Notre Dame fans worry about Dungey’s third and fourth (and fifth) options?

This group is balanced across the board and features a bunch of guys who are willing and capable to simply handle their roles. Babers’ offensive approach is almost always built around what the defensive is showing. That’s why you’ll see the tempo offense halt for checks at the line of scrimmage. Playing off coverage against a 2×2 set? Here comes the bubble screen. Going to give Jamal Custis man coverage? Time for the fly. There’s a simplicity to it, but with wrinkles in motions and releases, Babers does a great job of creating matchups and exposing weaknesses. Just ask Clemson defensive coordinator Brent Venables.

Looking at the players themselves, Custis is the most physically gifted. At 6-foot-5, he has looked like an NFL guy for three years, but he’s only now stayed healthy and performed consistently enough to produce. Slot receivers Sean Riley and Nykeim Johnson are extremely efficient, shifty and great after the catch (particularly Johnson). Tight end Ravian Pierce is a weapon in the red zone. I guarantee you the Orange tries to slip him off an RPO look at some point Saturday, and the safety who has watched Dungey run all game will have to be ready to stay back.

In his third year at Syracuse, head coach Dino Babers has already matched his win total from the previous two seasons combined. (Photo by Brett Carlsen/Getty Images)

This all comes just a week after Syracuse enjoyed Brian VanGorder’s defense to the tune of 54 points, but most of that came on the ground. While Dungey threw for 192 yards on 14-of-27 passing, the Orange ran for 326 yards on 55 carries. Which would Babers prefer, to run or to pass to a victory?

Babers will take whatever he’s given, but almost always tries to keep the threat of the ground game on the table. Honestly, Louisville gift-wrapped multiple red-zone possessions and penalized its way into a blowout. The Syracuse offense didn’t even have one of its better performance of the year, stalling out in the red zone multiple times.

Since we’ve talked about the receivers, here’s what you should know about the Orange run game. Junior Moe Neal is the top back. He’s got great burst and has become a simpler runner, rarely cutting more than once before hitting the jets. You’ll also see senior Dontae Strickland, the team’s best receiving and blocking back and true freshman Jarveon Howard, a bowling ball who is used most often in short-yardage and goal-line situations. When Syracuse is on the goal line, look out for a jumbo package featuring six offensive linemen, a tight end, two lead blockers and a back. One of those lead blockers is 280-pound sophomore fullback Chris Elmore, who was recruited by most programs to play defensive tackle.

I would usually have spent a question or two by now on the defense, but Syracuse’s does not impress much. This weekend certainly looks to be a shootout. Can you give me any reason to believe otherwise? I suppose it is a defense that has forced 25 turnovers this year (while Dungey’s offense has turned it over only 12 times).

You hit the nail on the head in regard to turnovers. This is a bend-but-don’t-break defense that wants to keep plays in front of it and force teams to earn points. A 15-play drive means 15 opportunities to force a turnover. That unit as a whole, but particularly the secondary, has been opportunistic in regard to ball disruption, though it all starts up front. Redshirt senior defensive tackle Chris Slayton is a monster, drawing regular double-teams to open up 1-on-1 chances for defensive ends Alton Robinson (nine sacks) and Kendall Coleman (seven).

Two of Syracuse’s top four corners are banged-up in junior Scoop Bradshaw and redshirt freshman Ifeatu Melifonwu, though Babers expects them to be active Saturday.

Before we get to a prediction, let’s return to my initial question. If a top-15 standing was not a preseason expectation, what are the Orange hopes for November at this point? Peach Bowl or bust?

Win out and a Peach or Fiesta Bowl spot seems all but guaranteed. If not, there’s a chance the Camping World Bowl takes a 9-3 Orange team, but there could be more travel-friendly fanbases in play as well. 8-4 seems like a near-lock for the Pinstripe Bowl, which would be disappointing for some considering Syracuse has played in the game twice, but could present a fun matchup with Penn State.

Keeping in mind Syracuse upset No. 2 Clemson last year and nearly pulled off the same feat this season, can it draw anything from those experiences? What do you expect from the Orange on Saturday?

I expect a team that will be mentally engaged and equipped with a solid game plan. I expect a close contest featuring big plays on both sides of the ball and a real emphasis from the Orange defense to get after Ian Book. No one will be overwhelmed by the opponent or the stage. But when push comes to shove, I think a Notre Dame-heavy crowd and outdoor venue make life tough on Syracuse’s offense down the stretch. All of its big wins during the Babers era have come in the Carrier Dome; in fact, before the Orange won at Wake Forest two weeks ago, the team had gone eight straight ACC road games without a win. So I’ve got Notre Dame winning a close one. I went with 41-37 in our predictions, for whatever that’s worth.

Hawaiian LB prospect commits to Notre Dame

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Marist Liufau did not need long to ponder. The consensus three-star linebacker reportedly received a scholarship offer during his visit to Notre Dame over this past weekend, and Wednesday evening he followed that up with a commitment.

Liufau (Punahou High School; Honolulu) will become the third Hawaiian player on the Irish roster, continuing a tradition started in earnest by Manti Te’o in 2008, a commitment coincidentally sparked by Te’o’s visit to Notre Dame during the 2008 Syracuse game. Liufau will join current junior safety Alohi Gilman and sophomore defensive tackle Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa as the current generation of Hawaiian Irish.

Liufau also held offers from five Pac-12 schools, highlighted by Oregon and USC, as well as Group of Five standards in the West in Boise State, Utah State and San Diego State. Instead, he will bring his defensive back experience to Notre Dame, joining a roster rich in current freshmen linebackers but low on proven commodities otherwise, meaning he should have an opportunity to prove himself, even if a number of others are trying to do so, as well.

The 20th commitment in the class, Liufau is the third linebacker, joining consensus four-star Osita Ekwonu (Providence Day; Charlotte, N.C.) and consensus three-star Jack Kiser (Pioneer; Royal Center, Ind.). It is presumed all 20 will ink their National Letters of Intent during the three-day early signing period beginning Dec. 19.

Notre Dame’s Opponents: Rise of Pittsburgh, Northwestern, Syracuse

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Welcome to a world where Northwestern and possibly Pittsburgh contend for conference championships while Virginia Tech, Florida State and USC have work to do to even be eligible for a bowl game. Welcome to a year in which No. 12 Syracuse is one of only three Irish opponents currently ranked. Welcome once again to Notre Dame’s schedule frustrations of 2018.

Michigan (9-1): Bookmakers predicted the Wolverines would beat Rutgers 43-6, so the actual 42-7 victory goes to show just how little Vegas knows. Michigan rattled off 35 unanswered points after giving up an 80-yard touchdown run in the first quarter.

Expect more of the same from the Wolverines this weekend, favored by 28.5 against Indiana (4 ET; FS1). A combined point total over/under of 53.5 suggests a 41-13 finish, but who would ever trust Vegas to properly handicap these things?

Ball St. (4-7): The Cardinals came out of their off week with a 42-41 overtime victory against Western Michigan on Tuesday. That win alone may cool Mike Neu’s seat this winter.

Vanderbilt (4-6): A 33-28 loss at Missouri puts the Commodores in a tough spot as far as bowl eligibility goes. The two-touchdown underdogs won the turnover battle 2-0 and did not trail until the final nine minutes, but Vanderbilt just could not pull off the surprise.

As a result, the ‘Dores need to finish 2-0 against Mississippi (7:30 ET; SEC Network) and Tennessee. Vanderbilt is favored by 2.5 points this weekend, and likely will be next, as well. For an SEC game, the 66.5 over/under stands out, projecting a 35-32 result.

Wake Forest (5-5): Maybe the Deacons will have another quarterback controversy next season. With freshman Sam Hartman out for the year, junior Jamie Newman led Wake Forest to a 27-23 victory at NC State on Thursday, completing 22-of-33 passes for 297 yards and three touchdowns. Two fourth-quarter scores brought the Deacons back from a 23-13 deficit.

Now Wake Forest can play the role of spoiler. Pittsburgh (12 ET) arrives as a touchdown favorite with a chance to win the ACC Coastal with a victory. A 34-27 game could go either way, quite frankly, when Greg Dortch is in the mix.

One of Stanford tight end Colby Parkinson’s four touchdown grabs against Oregon State on Saturday. (Photo by Jason O. Watson/Getty Images)

Stanford (6-4): The Cardinal finally brought its running game, rushing for 244 yards in a 48-17 victory at Oregon State. Even with an 8.1 yards per carry average, Stanford’s passing game still stole the show. Tight end Colby Parkinson finished with six catches for 166 yards and not one touchdown, not two, not three, but four scores.

The Cardinal now head to Cal (7:30 ET; Pac 12 Network) for the first wave of Pac-12 rivalries. Cal has not beaten Stanford since 2009, but did just snap a longer streak to USC, one tracing back to 2003. This would be a mild upset, with the Bears only two-point underdogs with a 45-point over/under making for a 24-22 projection.

Virginia Tech (4-5): It is not that Hokies defensive coordinator Bud Foster is inherently on a hot seat. His career is too well-established for that. But head coach Justin Fuente must be considering offseason possibilities after Virginia Tech gave up 492 rushing yards in a 52-22 loss at Pittsburgh.

Righting the ship, and keeping bowl possibilities afloat, will require the Hokies to win as 5.5-point underdogs at Miami (3:30 ET; ESPN). A 51.5-point over/under hints at a 28-23 Hurricanes victory.

Pittsburgh (6-4): The Panthers can clinch the ACC Coastal with a win at Wake Forest. Considering Pittsburgh ran for 13.7 yards per carry against Virginia Tech and Qadree Ollison led the way with 235 yards and three touchdowns on 16 rushes, that title game appearance should become a reality. The Deacons rank No. 103 in rushing yards allowed per game (203.6) and No. 113 in yards per carry (5.19).

Navy (2-8): The Midshipmen gave up 297 rushing yards on 52 carries in a not-as-close-as-it-seems 35-24 loss at Central Florida. Navy might snag a win this weekend, though, with Tulsa (3:30 ET; CBSSN) visiting and the Middies favored by five.

Northwestern (6-4): The Wildcats won the Big Ten West with a 14-10 triumph at Iowa led by freshman running back Isaiah Bowser’s 165 yards on 31 rushes.

That could lead to a letdown as Northwestern heads to Minnesota (12 ET: BTN) as 2.5-point favorites. If nothing else, the 50.5-point over/under seems high, a 26-24 conclusion out of character for the Wildcats this season, only reaching 26 points three times thus far.

Florida State (4-6): The Seminoles bowl chances took a drastic hit with their 42-13 loss at Notre Dame. They now need to win out, beginning as 1.5-point home underdogs to Boston College, who may be without starting quarterback Anthony Brown (3:30 ET; ESPN2). The absence of Brown and the ineptitude of Florida State’s offense combine for a 48.5-point over/under, a possible 25-24 squeaker.

Syracuse (8-2): The Orange put the final nail in the coffin of Bobby Petrino’s head coaching career with a 54-23 victory against Louisville on Friday. Presumably as a result of someone needing to hang around to coach the team for two more weeks, Cardinals defensive coordinator Brian VanGorder was not fired along with Petrino despite giving up 518 total yards and 326 rushing yards to Syracuse.

The Orange will look to continue their turnover-forcing ways against Notre Dame (2:30 ET; NBC) after forcing four last week. This line has moved back up to 10.5 in favor of the No. 3 team in the country while the over/under has fallen from 66.5 to 61.5 due to harsher weather expectations. A 36-25 Irish victory would assuredly be enough to keep Notre Dame comfortably in all Playoff considerations.

USC (5-5): The 15-14 loss to Cal turned up the heat on Clay Helton, even if he says he expects to coach at USC for another 15 years. The Trojans gained 277 total yards, rushing for 97 on 38 carries, a 2.6 yards per rush average.

Losing to UCLA (3:30 ET; FOX) might seal Helton’s fate, but USC should prevail as 3.5-point favorites.

12 ET: Wake Forest vs. Pittsburgh; Northwestern at Minnesota on BTN.
2:30 ET: Syracuse vs. Notre Dame on NBC.
3:30 ET: Virginia Tech vs. Miami on ESPN; Navy vs. Tulsa on CBSSN; Florida State vs. Boston College on ESPN2; USC at UCLA on FOX.
4:00 ET: Michigan vs. Indiana on FS1.
7:30 ET: Vanderbilt vs. Mississippi on SECN; Stanford at Cal on Pac-12 Network.

Favorites: Michigan -28.5; Vanderbilt -2.5; Stanford -2; Pittsburgh -7; Navy -5; Northwestern -2.5; USC -3.5
Underdogs: Wake Forest +7; Virginia Tech +5.5; Florida State +1.5; Syracuse +10.5.