Counting down the Irish: 25-21– RECOUNT UPDATE!

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RECOUNT UPDATE: If there was any question whether I’ve been out of the finance game too long, your fearless leader messed up his Excel spreadsheet and jacked up the rankings. This changes a few of the players we’ve tallied and puts Zeke Motta in at No. 25. My sincere apologies.

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It’s time to unveil the beginning of our annual Top 25 list, counting down the best players on the Irish roster. It’s an especially interesting list, and the group polled had some outstanding, yet very different, takes on who makes up the upper echelon of the Irish roster.

Last year, the top 15 players on our countdown were upperclassmen. This year, underclassmen make up almost one-third of the countdown, with one slotting into the top five. The biggest variance in voting was at the quarterback position. All four quarterbacks received votes, with last year’s depth chart hardly representative in this evaluation.

Here’s our voting panel:

Eric Hansen, South Bend Tribune @HansenSouthBend
John Walters, The Daily @jdubs88
John Vannie, NDNation.com
Eric Murtaugh, representing OneFootDown.com  @OneFootDown
Ryan Ritter, representing HerLoyalSons.com @HLS_NDtex
Keith Arnold, NBCSports.com’s Inside the Irish @KeithArnoldNBC

RANKINGS

25. Zeke Motta (S, Sr.) Quietly, Motta has put together a fairly solid career in South Bend, all while flying through the program much too quickly. Playing as a true freshman, Motta used a year of eligibility on special teams, and then had no choice but to play as a raw sophomore when safeties Jamoris Slaughter and Danny McCarthy went down with injuries. He’s had some bad swings and misses tackling in the open field, but Motta certainly looks the part of a big-time safety, and now we’ll find out if he’s the type of player that can anchor a unit. He was left off only one ballot (mine), and was the 26th man I had listed.

(Highest ranking: 21st. Lowest ranking: Unranked)

24. Tommy Rees (QB, Jr.) To call Rees the most polarizing player on the roster is probably understating it. The junior quarterback is Notre Dame’s all-time leader in completion percentage, but is probably the fourth most popular quarterback on the Irish roster after 14 interceptions and five fumbles lost crippled the Irish offense. Rees’ lack of mobility limit the Irish offense’s ability to utilize the quarterback in the running game, but he’s got the best grasp of the system, after playing in 20 games over the last two seasons. Rees’ erratic play helps explain the difficulty in ranking him. Two voters left him off their ballots completely, while one placed him on the number.

(Highest ranking: 17th. Lowest Ranking: Unranked x 2)

23. Andrew Hendrix (QB, Jr.) That Hendrix slots in front of the quarterback he backed up all season is telling. Also telling is the diversity in opinions on the junior quarterback from Ohio, who was left off three ballots entirely, but was the top quarterback on two others. Hendrix has all the physical tools necessary to win the starting quarterback job, but his feel for the game still lacks after two seasons in Kelly’s spread system. After completing all four of his throws against Air Force, Hendrix completed just 14 of his next 33 throws, with bad interceptions against Stanford and Florida State. On the ground, Hendrix presents an intriguing option, with the 220-pound bruiser a powerful option.

(Highest ranking: 14th. Lowest ranking: Unranked x 3)

22. Davonte Neal (WR, Fr.) Neal was one of the top ranked athletes in the country as a high school senior. And while wide receiver is an educated guess on where he’ll end up playing, Neal could easily contribute at cornerback and certainly should get a look in the return game. Neal’s speed is his best attribute, and getting the 5-foot-10, 175-pound dynamo in space with the football should give the Irish a much needed game breaker on the edges of the offense.  Neal is the highest rated freshman on this list, and slots in one spot beneath where Aaron Lynch ranked last year.

(Highest ranking: 16th. Lowest ranking: Unranked x 2)

21. TJ Jones (WR, Jr.) It shouldn’t be surprising that a two-year starter at wide receiver is ranked this high, yet Jones’ production leveled off after a promising freshman season. At 5-foot-11, 187-pounds, Jones lacks the size needed for an elite outside receiver, and a career average of 11 yards a catch doesn’t point to top end speed. But Jones carried a heavy burden last season with the sudden death of his father, and his inclusion on the Biletnikoff watch list shows he hasn’t been forgotten. Three voters left Jones off their lists completely, but his rating was buoyed by three votes that had him in the top twenty.

(Highest ranking: 13th. Lowest ranking: Unranked x 3)