And in that corner… The Michigan Wolverines

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If last Saturday’s victory was a “signature win for the Irish, this Saturday’s game is to settle a score. When No. 11 Notre Dame battles No. 18 Michigan, the Irish won’t just be looking to take down another ranked opponent and push their way into the country’s top ten, they’ll be looking to seek vengeance after one of the more heartbreaking losses in recent Irish memory, the third in a row of devastating defeats at the hands of Michigan.

Quite a bit has changed in the last three weeks. Before the Irish kicked off in Dublin and the Wolverines debuted in Dallas, most expected Brady Hoke’s squad to be the team on a collision course with the BCS. That was before Michigan was embarrassed by Alabama 41-14. They followed that loss up with a narrow escape against Air Force, where Michigan survived in spite of giving up 290 yards on the ground. Beating UMass hasn’t done much to sway the public opinion, and it appears that the Wolverines are a flawed team searching for answers, but lead by one superstar: quarterback Denard Robinson.

Of course, that’s been enough to beat the Irish the last two years, with Robinson taking over the game — on the ground in 2010, and through the air last year. As long as Shoelace is wearing a Michigan uniform, there’s always going to be fear in the hearts of Notre Dame nation.

Joining us to break down the big game is ESPN.com’s Michael Rothstein, who writes for Wolverine Nation. Mike has covered both sides of this rivalry, working the Irish beat for the Fort Wayne Journal Gazette before departing for Ann Arbor.

I asked, Mike answered. Here goes.

Inside the Irish: Most people expected Michigan to be 2-1 at this point. Yet most people are disappointed in how the Wolverines got there. Has it been a disappointing opening three games for Michigan?

Michael Rothstein: Tough to say, mostly because I think a lot of people around the Michigan proram thought the Wolverines would have a better showing against Alabama. What has been most concerning for Michigan has been its run game minus Denard Robinson and its play on both the offensive and defensive lines. Neither group has been particularly good, which could pose some major problems Saturday.

ITI: The Wolverines have had to replace some key contributors on both the offensive and defensive lines. Have their been some growing pains early?

MR: Yes. Michigan still appears to be searching for its most effective combination on the defensive line, having experimented with guys paying both inside at tackle and outside on the end. On offense, missing David Molk has been huge, but Elliott Mealer has been decent. While no linemen has been absolutely terrible in every game, as a unit they appear to have had some issues with chemistry and playing together.

ITI: This is Denard Robinson’s final year in Ann Arbor and his second year in Al Borges’ offense. Does he look more comfortable? Is he still a square peg in a round hole? He’s obviously one of the most dynamic runners in college football but is he getting better at quarterback?

MR: Yes, yes he does. Robinson is never going to be the dropback passer Borges covets for his offense to be most effective, but Robinson has improved as a passer and Borges has tweaked enough of his offense — Michigan has used more shotgun than ever, for instance — to suit Robinson’s unique skills. Robinson still makes some bad decisions but has still matured greatly in the role.

ITI: The Wolverines have found a way to crush the Irish’s hearts three years running. Outside of Robinson’s heroics, who are the likely suspects to do it this season?

MR: Robinson will still be the key to any Michigan victory but he’ll have help from two previously unknown sources if it happens — receiver Devin Gardner and tight end Devin Funchess. They have become the Wolverines’ top receiving threats and have a combined five touchdowns in five games. For Michigan to win, it’ll need one of those guys to have a huge game.

ITI: Michigan came into the season with a preseason top ten ranking and lofty expectations. They were exposed in the season opener, but was there a part of you that saw this coming? How good is this team? In a down year in the Big Ten, can they still fight their way to Pasadena?

MR: Remains to be seen. The Big Ten has no really good teams — at least not at this juncture — so the chance to win the league is certainly there, win or lose Saturday. Still think this team has the potential to be good as Michigan certainly got better as the season wore on last year. But the Wolverines are also a team that could very well be a better team than last season with a worse record.