Kelly’s talking points translate to pro football

47 Comments

Next man in. Unconscious competence. Count on me. Just a few of the building blocks Brian Kelly has used as he resurrected the Irish football program in his third season. For some, this sounds like your stereotypical management jargon that goes in one ear and out the other. But inside the Notre Dame football program, sentences like these have become commandments, maxims carried in day-to-day life that helped reshape the Irish football team.

It’s easy for those of us long out of college and following along from the internet to feel like Kelly and his staff’s message is just a bunch of coachspeak. But watching this season unfold, it’s hard to argue against the use of seemingly generic mantras like the “A-Team” or “Unfinished Business,” as they have become bedrock for a football team that’s fought against long odds to the top of college football.

Scrolling across the internet this morning, I stumbled upon two key quotes from coaches that show you the universality of Kelly’s coaching maxims. And funnily enough, they’re being used in the NFL, among the professional ranks where multi-million dollar contracts and grown men might see through anything that feels more like a motivational ploy than steadfast belief.

In Peter King‘s Monday Morning Quarterback, King talked with New Orleans interim head coach Joe Vitt, who had some keen observations on the plight of this year’s Saints team. If you’ve been following Notre Dame for the past 10 years, you can certainly see the parallels.

From King’s MMQB:

I thought interim coach Joe Vitt said something prescient after the 52-27 mauling at the hands of the Giants Sunday: “When you’re losing the way that were losing, you’re a fragile football team. We’ve got a lot of guys who are used to winning and doing things the right way around here. But unfortunately, we don’t have enough of them. All of a sudden something goes bad and its, oh, here we go again, instead of just setting your jaw and drawing a line in the sand and having some mental toughness to get it done.”

The dreaded “oh, here we go again,” has been infecting Notre Dame’s psyches for more than a decade, and was a major roadblock for Kelly and this coaching staff when they came to South Bend. In year one, Kelly helped establish a change in the program when his team picked itself up of the mat after hitting rock bottom against Tulsa, with the Irish running the table in November, beating Utah, Army and USC to propel the Irish into a blowout bowl victory against Miami.

But in 2011, that virus reinfected the team, and back-breaking losses to USF and Michigan started a promising season in the gutter before the squad could blink. It took a long offseason of training, and transcendent leadership from guys like Manti Te’o and a strong group of captains to change the culture of the program. Matching hard work in the weight room and practice field with mental preparation that allowed the team to peak during close and late situations, when the Irish often wilted.

Building mental and physical toughness sounds like one of those talking points that get a fanbase excited. Yet Kelly’s ability to do exactly that — as it has been on display throughout this magical season — is one of the reasons why Kelly is looked at as one of college football’s finest coaches.

***

One other quote that struck me came from Redskins back-up quarterback Kirk Cousins, who lead Washington to a miraculous comeback against the Ravens after Robert Griffin III was injured in the fourth quarter. Irish fans are very familiar with Cousins, who had a record-setting career at Michigan State and played many close games against Notre Dame, with Cousins often folding down the stretch.

Yet it was Cousins who saved the day for the Redskins. And after, he basically mirrored Kelly’s talking points about his quarterbacks this year, citing the delicate balance between science and art that a quarterback must possess.

Here’s Kelly from last spring’s Blue-Gold game, where he discussed Everett Golson‘s progress running the Irish offense.

“The quarterback position is both art and science,” Kelly said back in April. “The art part he’s got down. It’s the science and the consistency, all of those things to be a championship quarterback.”

And now this from Cousins yesterday to King:

“One of the things I’ve learned about being a quarterback,” said Cousins, and for a minute, he sounded like a Penn professor of Football 101 with a tweed coat on, “is that it’s a balance between being a robot and being an artist. On the touchdown to Garcon, that’s being an artist; you don’t really know how it’s going to look, but you’ve just got to get out of the pocket and create something. On the two-point conversion, you’re a robot. You take the play and do what’s called, because you know if it’s blocked the right way and set up the right way, it’ll work — the quarterback just executes it.”

Cousins and Griffin are being groomed under Mike and Kyle Shanahan, a coaching duo that knows quite a bit about offensive football. That Shanahan and Kelly both use strikingly similar analogies to the art of quarterbacking should have Irish fans feeling pretty good about the trajectory of Golson.