Given the chance, Hendrix finally ready for opportunity

54 Comments

For Notre Dame fans, Andrew Hendrix has felt like an enigma. With the tangible skill-set of a star quarterback, Irish fans have watched and waited patiently for the Cincinnati native to work his way into the starting lineup, where he’d surely be able to utilize his strong throwing arm, powerful running style, and intellect that’ll one day make him a successful M.D. Yet even with a blueprint that looked destined for success, Hendrix only seemed to move farther and farther away from the playing field as his tenure in South Bend continued.

If it weren’t for the spring’s quarterback exodus, Hendrix would likely only be remembered for a two game stretch where he was given a shot to win the quarterbacking job late in 2011. Against Stanford and Florida State, Hendrix completed just 14 of 32 passes for 216 yards, throwing two really bad interceptions in back-to-back losses to close out a disappointing season. Heading into fall camp, Hendrix looked like a fourth string quarterback, another blue-chip quarterback recruit that struggled to pan out.

But all that changed when Gunner Kiel and Everett Golson left school. And to Hendrix’s credit, he was ready to take advantage of the opportunities that finally presented themselves. Now just one play away from running the Irish offense, Brian Kelly talked about the difference between the quarterback who played against Stanford and the one that now sits at No. 2 on the depth chart.

“The difference is, as it related to Hendrix, is that he was a niche quarterback for us,” Kelly explained. “He’s no longer a niche quarterback. I mean, he can run our offense. Last year, the year before, we had to run special packages for him.”

Playing quarterback is one of the most difficult jobs in sports. It isn’t just Notre Dame (Zach Frazer, Demetrius Jones, Dayne Crist, Hendrix) that have struggled with high profile recruits. Just take a look at the entire 2010 QB class. And while Hendrix committed to studying his playbook along with his chemistry and biology workloads, he acknowledged that it was a difficult slog for him, especially not growing up surrounded by football.

“There were a lot of intricacies of the game that I didn’t know,” Hendrix said last week. “And I didn’t know that I didn’t know them.”

But Hendrix’s love of Notre Dame was a big reason why he didn’t fret when things didn’t look to be going his way on the field. And while he seemed like more of a candidate to transfer than anybody else on the depth chart, Hendrix was incredibly candid for his reasons to stick it out in South Bend.

“You would probably have to be out of your mind to leave here, in all honesty,” Hendrix said. “At all times, you’re a number of plays away from being the guy on the field. And if you have confidence in yourself, then it’s not hard to stay here. Plus, the school is unbelievable, the people are unbelievable, this organization’s great. It really was never an option in my mind.”

That loyalty is paying off. What looked in all likelihood to be Hendrix’s last season in South Bend could turn into a return in ’14, where he’ll add veteran depth to support Everett Golson. And while Tommy Rees enters the season as the clear-cut number one quarterback, Kelly seemed to fulfill one of football’s funny paradoxes. Now that Hendrix isn’t a niche quarterback, the team will try to make sure he has one on the playing field.

“We’re going to take advantage of some of the things he can do,” Kelly said. “He can run. He’s a physical runner. So we may have some more quarterback runs, but it’s not going to turn into an option game with him in there. He can run our offense. So we don’t have to turn the playbook inside out to put Andrew Hendrix into the game.

“He can do much, much more, and we’re very confident, if he has to go in the game, that he can run our offense.”