Irish A-to-Z: Chris Brown

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Entering his third season at Notre Dame, junior wide receiver Chris Brown will need to play with a sense of urgency. It should come easily, thanks to a depth chart filled with young talent. No longer the underclassman with speed and promise, Brown’s half way through his eligibility, only scratching the surface of his talent, while the depth chart behind him now owns that tag.

Coming to Notre Dame as one of South Carolina’s premiere track and field athlete’s, Brown supplied one of 2012’s most memorable plays — a 50-yard reception against Oklahoma — but has failed to make much of an impact yet, with his 15 catches in 2013 (five coming against Rutgers in the Pinstripe Bowl) and one touchdown largely non-factors in the Irish season.

But a promising spring practice where Brown was the leader of the position group (DaVaris Daniels’ absence made Brown the veteran member), has many thinking 2014 could be a breakout season.

Let’s take a closer look at the junior from Hanahan, South Carolina.

 

CHRIS BROWN
6’1.5″, 191 lbs.
Junior, No. 2

 

RECRUITING PROFILE

While his senior season was shortened because of injury, Brown was among the nation’s best track athletes, a triple jumper who put up prep records that would’ve had him winning a Big East title as a high school junior. Brown’s length and long speed were two things that Notre Dame just didn’t have on their roster, and were big reasons why Brian Kelly thought Brown was among the most under-rated prospects that the Irish were signing.

“If we were talking from an NFL standpoint and I was the general manager after draft day, we would consider this young man a “steal” of the draft,” Kelly said on Signing Day, 2012. “We believe he has a skill set that we do not have currently on this football team. 

“As you know he’s also a top triple jumper in the nation.  He’s got great explosiveness, good size at 6‑2.  He’s a guy that can take the quick short pass and turn it into a touchdown.  Could be a five‑yard completion, and he can take it the rest of the way. He has size and he’s got speed, and he hasn’t come close to his potential.”

Even if Brown was considered below-the-radar by recruiting services (Rivals.com had him listed as a three-star prospect), Brown took an official visit to Alabama, had offers from Arkansas, North Carolina, South Carolina, Vanderbilt and Virginia Tech.

 

PLAYING CAREER

Freshman Season (2012): Saw action in all 12 games. Started two. First catch of his career was a 50-yarder against Oklahoma. Contributed a six-yard catch against Wake Forest.

Sophomore Season (2013): Started four games while appearing in all 13 for the Irish. Season-long catch of 40-yards against Purdue. First touchdown catch was a 15-yarder against Air Force. Made five catches against Rutgers, while racking up 57 receiving yards against Temple, a career high.

 

FUTURE POTENTIAL

Heading into spring practice, I fully expected Brown to get passed by the youth on this depth chart, namely Will Fuller, who took over as the Irish deep threat, and Corey Robinson, who showed himself to be a more dependable pass catcher than Brown as a true freshman. (Even James Onwualu, before he switched sides of the ball, was looking more likely to be contributing than Brown in my eyes.)

But if we are to believe  what we heard this spring from head coach Brian Kelly and offensive coordinator Mike Denbrock, Brown had a great 15 practices and supplied the type of leadership and knowledge base that’ll get him onto the field early and often next season.

The truth is the Irish are desperate for a leader to emerge from this group. They expect DaVaris Daniels to be that player, though his absence from spring drills and inconsistency are more of a tease than an assurance. But Brown is the type of athletic and explosive receiver that maybe just needs a little bit more time to find his place in this offense, and perhaps the added work with the coaching staff this summer, and the urgency that comes with understanding that your college career is half over, will supply just that.

 

CRYSTAL BALL

This prediction is completely dependent on a few key variables: First, the explosiveness that we’re hoping to see from the Irish offense in 2014, namely quarterback Everett Golson’s ability to hit big plays down the field. If that’s the case, then expect Brown to be one of the main beneficiaries.

Secondly, it’s dependent on Brown cleaning up his game. In a stable of sure-handed pass catchers, Brown stood out for a few careless drops. There was also the end zone interception against Pitt where Brown wasn’t competitive on the route. Those types of things are fatal in a Brian Kelly offense, and will get you taken off the field.

Perhaps we were expecting too much from Brown early, the product of remembering one singular play in a season where he only made two catches. Brown played his best in the Pinstripe Bowl, rebounding from the disappointment against Pitt and capitalizing on the opportunity after a month of practice.

I’m not entirely convinced that Brown is any better than the fourth receiver in this offense, and that doesn’t take into consideration slot players C.J. Prosise and Amir Carlisle. But if this offense runs optimally, there should be catches and touchdowns to go around, for Daniels, Fuller, Robinson and Brown.

We’ll know if the resurgent spring was coachspeak and the bowl game simply a data point come this fall. But Brown is the type of player that the Irish are counting on to help them score points, so his ascent could be crucial in 2014.

***

The Irish A-to-Z
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Alex Bars
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Kyle Brindza

Notre Dame, Ian Book turn to passing game in blow out of Wake Forest

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The instinct is to lead with a “book” pun here to cleverly recognize Notre Dame junior quarterback Ian Book’s performance in his first career start made by coaching choice rather than injury to usual-starter Brandon Wimbush. Such wordplay would be a disservice to Book’s showing in the 56-27 Irish victory at Wake Forest on Saturday and minimize the decision made by Notre Dame head coach Brian Kelly to make the change despite a No. 8 ranking and remaining undefeated.

“I didn’t sleep great last night because that’s a pretty big decision to make when you’re 3-0 and your quarterback that was leading your team is [12-3] as a starter,” Kelly said. “Had a lot of confidence in Ian and I thought our offense played to the level I thought it was capable of.”

Book improved that record to 4-0 without any trouble, even if the Deacons did hand the Irish their first deficit of the season with a first-quarter field goal. Book responded by completing all four of his passes on the subsequent drive, three of them going to senior tight end Alizé Mack for 41 yards. Once sophomore running back Jafar Armstrong found the end zone with a 30-yard score, Notre Dame never trailed again, rattling off 28 unanswered points in one stretch spanning much of the second and third quarters.

Armstrong finished with 98 yards and two touchdowns on only eight carries, part of the Irish gaining 245 yards on 39 carries (sacks adjusted). Book threw for 325 yards and two more scores — giving him five total thanks to three short jaunts across the goal line of 2, 2 and 1 yard — to bring the Notre Dame total to 566 yards, its most of the season by 152.

Despite giving up more than 17 points for the first time of the year, the Irish had little trouble with Wake Forest’s up-tempo attack. The Deacons gained 398 total yards, their first time falling short of 500 this season, on 92 plays, a lackluster average of 4.2 yards per play. Their final two scores came against what was increasingly Notre Dame’s second and third-units, the first time those reserves have gotten a chance to stretch their legs in a game.

They can thank Book for that opportunity, above all others.

Though this pass in the end zone fell incomplete, senior tight end Alizé Mack benefited from the change in starting quarterbacks, setting a career-high in receiving yards with 61 and tying his career-high in receptions with six. That latter mark was originally set when Ian Book started a 2017 game at North Carolina in place of injured then-starter Brandon Wimbush. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

PLAYER OF THE GAME
Book, obviously. His stats jump off the page no matter the situation: A 73.5 percent completion rate to gain 325 yards by connecting with 10 different receivers (two more than the season’s previous high, set last week against Vanderbilt). Nine rushes for 47 yards (sacks adjusted). Five total touchdowns.

If this proves to be Book’s coming-out party, that will be a tough standard to maintain.

His connection with Mack stands out. Though the senior did not reach the end zone, Book looked for him eight times, including repeatedly early to build a rhythm. Mack caught six of those for 61 yards, both career highs. Frankly, he nearly matched his combined output in the season’s first three games of six catches for 74 yards.

Book found Mack both in the flat and headed downfield on a seam route, displaying a diverse skill set from the tight end previously only speculated about. Mack was not the only tight end Book looked to, also connecting with sophomore Brock Wright for a three-yard score, Wright’s first in his career and only second career catch. His first? It came last week, on a pass from Book.

TURNING POINT OF THE GAME
If not the early days of the week when Kelly decided to switch his primary playmaker, inserting Book into the starting lineup and moving Wimbush to the sideline, then …

For the first time this season, the Irish did not score on their first possession. The Book experiment looked to be a questionable one when Notre Dame could not muster much on its second possession, either. A fumble from sophomore receiver Michael Young ended the third. At that point, 12 plays had yielded 42 yards and no points. Wake Forest led. Another long day appeared imminent.

The Irish scored touchdowns on eight of their next nine possessions. The fourth of which eliminated any Deacons hope before it could genuinely take root. Wake Forest had just run a breakneck drive covering 75 yards in 10 plays that took fewer than three minutes to come within 21-13. The Deacons had begun the day trading field goals for touchdowns, but when senior running back Matt Colburn scored from two yards out, suddenly their offense seemed more viable. The execution it needed had shown up.

Notre Dame responded with a play many have become conditioned to cringe at. It is nearly a pavlovian response: When the Irish run a bubble screen to a receiver, express frustration and doubt the play-calling acumen as soon as the pass is thrown parallel to the line of scrimmage.

It is hard to doubt the concept when it results in a 66-yard dash by Young, sprung by blocks from Mack and senior receiver Miles Boykin. Book’s stat line was the beneficiary, thanks to both the yards after the catch and the chance to score a 2-yard rushing touchdown. In just 62 seconds, Notre Dame’s lead was back to two possessions before halftime. Wake Forest would not score again until the Irish had already raced to a 49-13 lead near the end of the third quarter.

Notre Dame relied on its rushing game less than ever before this season, but it still produced. Sophomore Jafar Armstrong began the day of Irish scoring with this 30-yard touchdown run. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

STAT OF THE GAME
At halftime, Book’s stat line read 16-of-24 passing for 189 yards. The two dozen pass attempts stood out, especially in comparison to the team total of 15 rushing attempts to that point. It was the first time Notre Dame’s offense skewed toward the air in the first half.

Vanderbilt: 27 rushes in the first half; 17 passes.
Ball State: 20 rushes; 17 passes.
Michigan: 25 rushes; 15 passes.

Even with the hefty lead, the Irish balance came closer to even than it had all season.

Wake Forest: 40 rushes in the game; 36 passes.
Vanderbilt: 48 rushes; 26 passes.
Ball State: 41 rushes; 31 passes.
Michigan: 47 rushes; 22 passes.

“It’s where we have wanted it to go and grow,” Kelly said. “The balance necessary of run and pass is where ultimately this offense has been (going). I brought [offensive coordinator Chip Long] in to run a balanced run-pass offense.

“You saw what it should look like today.”

The shift toward the air showed in both the total of 566 yards and in the average of 7.4 yards gained per play. The previous peak for the Irish was 5.8 against Ball State. (Vanderbilt: 5.1; Michigan 4.4)

PLAY(S) OF THE GAME
Young’s bubble screen nearly to the end zone could qualify, but instead this space will include mention of a moment that occurred long after the result was determined. Freshman quarterback Phil Jurkovec undoubtedly did not expect his first collegiate playing time to come anywhere but Notre Dame Stadium, but the last two weeks of close games had changed those plans. With about four minutes left at Wake Forest, the heralded passer entered.

On his third snap, he comfortably and confidently fired a deep pass toward classmate Kevin Austin. The receiver’s legs innocently tangled with the defensive back’s, removing any chance of a completion, but it was telling how at ease Jurkovec was with the heave.

On the next snap, Jurkovec ran around the right end for a 7-yard gain, enjoying every step of it.

It was not all wonderful by the supposed quarterback-of-the-future, as he then missed a wide-open Wright on a crossing route, the exact kind of spot a quarterback praised for his accuracy should shine.

A WIN IS A WIN IS A …

SCORING SUMMARY
First Quarter
5:19 — Wake Forest field goal. Nick Sciba 30 yards. Wake Forest 3, Notre Dame 0. (4 plays, 1 yard, 0:41)
3:06 — Notre Dame touchdown. Jafar Armstrong 30-yard run. Justin Yoon PAT good. Notre Dame 7, Wake Forest 3. (6 plays, 75 yards, 2:13)

Second Quarter
14:56 — Wake Forest field goal. Sciba 39 yards. Notre Dame 7, Wake Forest 6. (12 plays, 54 yards, 3:10)
11:25 — Notre Dame touchdown. Brock Wright 3-yard pass from Ian Book. Yoon PAT good. Notre Dame 14, Wake Forest 6. (10 plays, 80 yards, 3:31)
9:19 — Notre Dame touchdown. Tony Jones 4-yard run. Yoon PAT good. Notre Dame 21, Wake Forest 6. (2 plays, 4 yards, 0:10)
6:26 — Wake Forest touchdown. Matt Colburn 2-yard. Sciba PAT good. Notre Dame 21, Wake Forest 13. (10 plays, 75 yards, 2:53)
5:24 — Notre Dame touchdown. Book 2-yard run. Yoon PAT good. Notre Dame 28, Wake Forest 13. (4 plays, 75 yards, 1:02)

Third Quarter
9:46 — Notre Dame touchdown. Chase Claypool 7-yard pass from Book. Yoon PAT good. Notre Dame 35, Wake Forest 13. (9 plays, 74 yards, 3:18)
5:15 — Notre Dame touchdown. Jafar Armstrong 1-yard run. Yoon PAT good. Notre Dame 42, Wake Forest 13. (7 plays, 71 yards, 2:25)
4:18 — Notre Dame touchdown. Book 2-yard run. Yoon PAT good. Notre Dame 49, Wake Forest 13. (3 plays, 47 yards, 0:47)
0:44 — Wake Forest touchdown. Kendall Hinton 23-yard run. Sciba PAT good. Notre Dame 49, Wake Forest 20. (9 plays, 75 yards, 3:34)

Fourth Quarter
11:27 — Notre Dame touchdown. Book 1-yard run. Yoon PAT good. Notre Dame 56, Wake Forest 20. (11 plays, 75 yards, 4:17)
4:53 — Wake Forest touchdown. Jamie Newman 15-yard rush. Sciba PAT good. Notre Dame 56, Wake Forest 27. (13 plays, 79 yards, 6:34)

Notre Dame at Wake Forest: Who, what, when, where, why and by how much?

Associated Press
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WHO? No. 8 Notre Dame (3-0) at Wake Forest (2-1).

WHAT? A rematch from last year’s 48-37 Irish victory, though both of these teams have since lost their greatest offensive weapons. Notre Dame can no longer claim a record-setting back running behind two offensive linemen already starting in the NFL, and the Demon Deacons are without four-year starting quarterback John Wolford and his impeccable understanding of the scheme.

WHEN? 12 p.m. ET. Yes, a rare early kick for the Irish, their first since back-to-back noon kicks to start October in 2016, a 50-33 victory against Syracuse in East Rutherford, N.J., and a 10-3 loss at North Carolina State in a literal hurricane.

WHERE? BB&T Field, Winston-Salem, N.C. The smallest home stadium of all 65 Power Five schools, BB&T holds 31,500. The next smallest is Washington State’s Martin Stadium, holding a bit more than 32,000.

ABC will have the national broadcast, and one presumes it will be available for streaming through the Watch ESPN app.

WHY? In many respects, the schedule has set up nearly-ideally for the Irish, and this trip plays right into that. Notre Dame got to face Michigan before the Wolverines found anything of an offense, having scored 49 and 45 points in the two weeks since. Then the Irish could work through offensive struggles of their own against Ball State and Vanderbilt. Now Notre Dame’s first road trip of the season also looks to be its easiest of only four true road games.

That has opened the door for Irish head coach Brian Kelly to reportedly start junior Ian Book at quarterback in place of a healthy Brandon Wimbush, the starter in 15 of the last 16 games, only sitting at North Carolina last year due to a mild foot injury.

IT SEEMS LIKE NOTRE DAME HAS PLAYED WAKE FOREST A LOT OF LATE.
That is not false. The two met for the first time in 2011, and this will be their fifth matchup in only eight years. The Irish have won the previous four, with the only trip to Winston-Salem being the only one-possession contest of the bunch, a 24-17 outcome in that first game. At the time, it did not feel low-scoring; No. 1 LSU was holding off No. 2 Alabama 9-6 in overtime without anyone finding the end zone as Brian Kelly began his own postgame press conference.

BY HOW MUCH? After spending much of the week with Notre Dame favored by eight points, the spread swung Friday to a 6.5-point margin with a combined point total over/under of 59.5. If sticking to those marks, a 33-27 Irish win would be the conclusion.

Two parts of that stick out. Notre Dame has yet to give up more than 17 points in a game while the Deacons managed just 23 in their opener at Tulane. The Irish, meanwhile, have not scored more than 24 points in a game since running up those 48 against Wake Forest last year, a seven-game stretch.

Then why the elevated over/under? The Deacons defense is bad enough, bookmakers expect Notre Dame’s offense to finally break through, no matter who leads the way at quarterback.

I’ll believe that when I see it, though the atrocious Wake Forest defense should give way more often than speedy and shifty receiver Greg Dortch finds the end zone.

Notre Dame 27, Wake Forest 24.
(3-0 in pick; 1-2 against the spread, 3-0 point total.)

INSIDE THE IRISH READING:
Could Notre Dame’s identity be as obvious as it seems?
Who can Notre Dame play at nickel back to slow Wake’s Greg Dortch?
Notre Dame’s Opponents: Rough weekends for Florida State & USC with little relief in sight
Notre Dame’s scripts bear more repeating
And In That Corner … The Wake Forest Demon Deacons
Things To Learn: Will Notre Dame’s offense show up on its first road trip?
Brian Kelly refuses to tip Notre Dame’s hand amid QB rumors
When applauding Notre Dame’s opponents is appropriate

OUTSIDE READING:
Ian Book expected to start for Notre Dame
Third and too many for Notre Dame
Wake Forest, and Greg Dortch, primed for opportunity against No. 8 Notre Dame
Kendall Hinton’s return to field could come in a few different places
Magic won’t fix Wake Forest’s issues with pass defense, so the Deacons turn to other methods
Talent, tragedy and triumph: The legend of Sam Hartman
Sam Hartman’s path to Wake Forest’s starting QB has been anything but normal
How did Florida State’s offensive line get this bad?
Eagles promote running back Josh Adams from practice squad

Friday at 4: When applauding Notre Dame’s opponent is appropriate

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It took me four years to watch every episode of “Cheers.” Late at night, wanting background noise while turning notes into coherent sentences, the banter filled the silence at an appropriate rate. The few laughs every 22 minutes were a bonus. Once Sam Malone turned off the lights at the bar for the last time, it was only natural to continue with “Frasier.”

An episode late in season four played on a screen to my side while compiling the needed scores, stats and spreads for this week’s Notre Dame’s Opponents entry. I barely heard Frasier’s son, Frederick, explain he had long known his dad wasn’t perfect.

“You couldn’t fix my computer. You thought Venus was the North Star, and I’ve seen you run.” Frederick told Frasier before explaining why he had never pointed out these deficiencies. “I thought it might hurt your self-esteem.”

I have never worried about those feelings with my father. His shortcomings are too apparent to pretend not to notice. He finishes off the tray of potatoes at dinner without asking if anyone else wants them, before they have made so much as one trip around the table. Calling his handwriting illegible is an insult to any three-year-old who ever picked up chalk.

And, he’s a Boston Red Sox fan.

Despite that terrible mistake, my father still always gave a nod to New York Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter as someone he could tolerate. More than that, he outright respected Yankees closer Mariano Rivera. Greatness like that should not be clouded by rivalry, no matter how many times Rivera and the Yankees shut the door on the Red Sox.

The same can and should be applied in any sport. Make no mistake, Rivera is the extreme of a fandom’s struggle. He was such a class act while throwing the single-greatest pitch in baseball history, a Red Sox (or Braves or Mets or Phillies) fan could hate how effective he was, but not the player himself. Watching Mariano required a touch of admiration.

By no means are any of the following examples anywhere near Rivera’s caliber. He may be on his own in that right. (After all, more men have walked on the moon than knocked in an earned postseason run against Rivera.)

So early in his career, perhaps Wake Forest junior receiver Greg Dortch should be considered near the other end of this thought process, but Notre Dame fans should watch Dortch tomorrow and expect to marvel at what he can do on a football field, even as he keeps the score a bit closer than they may like. If not rationally capable of that, then perhaps table the appreciation for afterward and provided an Irish victory, return to some of Dortch’s dashes down the field. He is electric with the football in a way not seen often enough. Then again, it is its rarity that makes it so worthwhile.

Dortch has touched the football 45 times in three games this year. He has gained 674 yards. At some point, he will beat Notre Dame’s secondary. Separate the effect on the game from the actual ability for just a moment, and recognize how unfathomably quick Dortch is.

In a year, expect to experience something similar when Boston College visits South Bend in late November. Sophomore running back AJ Dillon may already be the best running back in the country. With another year, he could be approaching the platonic ideal of college football.

It will be tougher to appreciate Dillon than it should be with Dortch, though. The Eagles will be a better team than the Deacons are. Given last week’s result, Boston College already is. Unless a player is as peerless as the Great Mariano — who holds the record for throwing the last pitch in the most World Series. How many did he do so? Answer at bottom. — some ill will remains as they succeed at your team’s expense. Despite Dortch’s best efforts, Notre Dame should still win this weekend, just not by as much as if he was out with another injury. Topping Boston College in 14 months will not be as certain.

That is part of the formula to appreciating individual opponents in college football. An excellent player on a defeated foe is more palatable to reminisce over thanks to the eventual victory. The win makes the remembered frustration feel deserved afterward.

It is why names like Boston College linebacker Luke Kuechly, Georgia Tech receiver Calvin Johnson and Pittsburgh receiver Larry Fitzgerald are remembered with nothing but fondness. Combined, they went 0-6 against Notre Dame.

In an informal survey of a dozen Irish fans this week asking what past opposing players they had most enjoyed to watch, those names were mentioned frequently, but combined they did not outpace USC running back Reggie Bush. The praises uttered for the Heisman-returnee all included caveats. Those disclaimers did not tie to any of the Trojans’ vacated wins or issues with the NCAA. They boiled down to one thing: USC went 3-0 against Notre Dame during Bush’s time there.

Dortch has not played the Irish. A life-threatening intestinal injury sidelined him last year. He may well end his career 1-0 against Notre Dame, but that is not reason enough to not take a moment Saturday afternoon and mutter some four-letter words under your breath out of respect, appreciation and admiration.

Even my father mustered that much for Mariano after he threw three scoreless innings in game seven of the 2003 ALCS to keep the Red Sox at bay for another year. His handwriting remains terrible and Thanksgiving potatoes are a 50/50 proposition for the rest of us, but he at least got that acknowledgment right.

(Five. Mariano threw the last pitch in five World Series, which includes the 2001 defeat.)

Brian Kelly refuses to tip Notre Dame’s hand amid QB rumors

Associated Press
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Brandon Wimbush will play. Ian Book will play. That much is clear, and it is not a change from the season’s first three weeks.

Which will start? Notre Dame head coach Brian Kelly would not divulge that Thursday, though that was probably more an inclination to stick to inane modern coaching standards than it was actual indecision.

“We need them both to win,” Kelly said of his quarterbacks. “They are both ready.”

The questions arose out of speculation from national media personalities the Irish may turn to the backup Book more at Wake Forest, if not even start the junior. Book has seen less than a handful of snaps in each game thus far this season, usually within yards of the goal line.

Notre Dame turned to Book in those spots as they fit his aptitude in read-option packages beginning under center. That does not mean Book was not ready to play no matter the field position.

“He was prepared to play anywhere,” Kelly said. “That’s just where he played in those games.”

Once asked, there was no situation in which Kelly was going to say more than that. Given the Irish have already made it a point to include Book in each game plan, downgrading that status to insist Wimbush is the starter would serve no function but internal confusion. If Book’s role is going to increase, then Kelly gains nothing by warning the Demon Deacons.

RELATED READING: Things To Learn — Will Notre Dame’s offense show up on its first road trip?

He did make one unexpected acknowledgement, though. Throughout Kelly’s tenure, the backup quarterback has taken about 40 percent of the reps in practice. That was true with Book during the preseason, but the ratio has apparently since skewed.

“They’ve been pretty close,” Kelly said. “… This has been pretty close to 50/50. We’ve been managing it that way.”

The one quarterback not in the mix is freshman Phil Jurkovec, working primarily with the scout team. Kelly would like to get Jurkovec some playing time in line with the new NCAA rule allowing up to four games of action without jeopardizing a year of eligibility. Any playing time for Jurkovec would come in the specific scenario of a blowout, naturally.

“If we got an opportunity, we would love to get him some playing time, as well,” Kelly said. “We’ve been in some close, hard-fought games.

“… It’s hard when you’re running someone else’s offense each week. We bring him up [to practice with the offense] and he’s working off a card. What we like most about him is his leadership presence, just the way he handles himself, but I couldn’t really tell you whether he could go in there and run the offense. He hasn’t had that much work.”

Other freshmen are on the verge of contributing in competitive moments, some perhaps not in more than four games. Kelly noted cornerback Tariq Bracy and linebacker Shayne Simon, having appeared in three games and the latter two contests, respectively, as well as cornerback Noah Boykin and receiver Joe Wilkins, neither of which has taken the field yet.

“There’s probably half a dozen guys that we’re seeing that, ‘Hey, we’re probably going to see two or three or maybe four games on some of these guys,’” Kelly said. “I don’t want to say this in a negative way, there’s a list that are moving from suspects to prospects relative to playing time now.”

Freshman receiver Braden Lenzy is not among that grouping at the current moment as he recovers from a concussion, per Kelly. Lenzy was not in uniform last weekend and will not travel to Wake Forest.

ON NOTRE DAME’S NICKEL BACK PACKAGES
Against the Deacons and junior receiver Greg Dortch, the Irish will rely on sets with more defensive backs than the usual base will. Without senior Shaun Crawford (torn ACL), Notre Dame lacks an established nickel back. The luxury of junior cornerback Donte Vaughn allows star junior cornerback Julian Love to spend more time across from the slot and therefore probably Dortch.

“Julian has that flexibility to move inside,” Kelly said. “We taught him the nickel, (he) had known it. It puts three veteran players on the field for us [at cornerback].”

RELATED READING: Who can Notre Dame play at nickel back to slow Wake’s Greg Dortch?

ON DARNELL EWELL
The sophomore defensive tackle shall now be described as a sophomore offensive guard.

“We felt as we looked at the depth of certain positions, that was an area that we had some issues,” Kelly said. “We felt like in particular this year he could make some strides there.

“He has. He’s really strong. He uses his lower body very well. He can move people off the point. Early indications are that might be a good fit for him.”

At guard, Bars is in the mix with sophomores Dillan Gibbons and Josh Lugg and freshman John Dirksen.