Elston ready to make his mark on Notre Dame recruiting

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Notre Dame landed three recruiting commitments coming out of the weekend’s Junior Day. And if it’s up to Mike Elston, there’ll be plenty more where that came from.

Elston spoke after Monday’s practice with the assembled media to talk about spring football, his role in the recruiting department and how Notre Dame’s efforts to continue to land elite talent are only going to be ramped up.

Along with Mike Denbrock, Elston is Brian Kelly’s longest-tenured assistant at Notre Dame, working with Notre Dame’s sixth-year head coach at both Central Michigan and Cincinnati before joining him in South Bend. After a few staff reshuffles and more than one opportunity to move to another program, Elston was promoted to recruiting coordinator while taking over the linebackers as Keith Gilmore joined the coaching staff.

Elston talked about returning to a job he held at Cincinnati, and his thoughts on what makes for productive recruiting with BlueandGold.com.

“I was the recruiting coordinator at Cincinnati. The biggest thing was just reorganizing, and making sure that everybody within the recruiting department knew and understood the roles that they needed to play, so that we could function at a really high level,” Elston said.

After Tony Alford left to join Ohio State, Elston takes over the position, previously held by Chuck Martin before that. While Elston’s reputation on the recruiting trail isn’t as celebrated as Alford’s, Elston has won more than his share of battles for good players. He also makes the very good point that being a great recruiter and being a great recruiting coordinator aren’t the same thing.

“Typically your best recruiters, if you take and tie them down with all of the constraints that you have as a recruiting coordinator… You take your best recruiters and put them in that role, then you’re limiting what they can do,” Elston explained.

“You don’t have to be the best recruiter on the staff to make sure that everybody is doing what they are supposed to. It’s about holding people accountable and having leadership for the people that are working under you for the recruiting department. I’m excited because I think those are my strengths. I think that I’m able to do those things. I’m excited about where the recruiting department is headed.”

We saw some of those organizational skills in action as the Irish hosted players from 11 different states, no small feat when you consider that travel on unofficial visits is paid for by the recruit.

Another area of focus is connecting with recruits on social media. With just about every teenager and seemingly every bluechip recruit taking to Twitter, Instagram or Facebook to talk about their recruiting status, it’s critical that college coaches become as comfortable building relationships on those platform as they are in traditional manners, not necessarily the easiest thing for grown men of a very different generation.

Elston made it clear that the Irish have established a presence. And he believes it’ll be more proprietary and ground-breaking than just sending out updates in 140 characters or less.

 

“We’re taking this thing to a whole different level,” Elston said, not wanting to go into details. “One area of a massive improvement is our social media.”

You can see that effort when you follow Notre Dame’s assistants on Twitter. And as he does after every commitment, Brian Kelly took to Twitter yesterday to blast out #WeAreND, after accepting the commitment from Tony Jones Jr.

Even with spring practice midswing and important on field work taking place, Notre Dame’s recruiting efforts are just getting started for the class of 2016.

“We’ll be all over. We’re already talking about where we’re coaching this summer. We’re going to be at a few camps,” Elston said. “We got a bunch of kids coming in this weekend, a bunch of big players, so we’re excited about those guys. We’ve got our coaches clinic, so coaches will be bring players with them, and that will be great. We have a busy, busy, busy next couple of months.”