Last looks: Quarterbacks

38 Comments

When Everett Golson pulled the chute and headed south to Tallahassee, Notre Dame’s quarterback competition quickly cleared up. This is Malik Zaire’s football team.

Depending on how you look at it, that could be a very good thing or a very bad thing. Those in favor of having Golson stick around liked the idea of a three-year starter and a quarterback with an elite throwing arm. Those ready to see him go were sick and tired of watching him cough up the football, each mistake erasing a highlight that would’ve looked great on YouTube, but was erased as it derailed a football team that couldn’t withstand critical mistakes, especially with a second-half, swiss cheese defense.

The Irish move forward, with Zaire implanted as the unofficial leader of the offense, a quarterback with no fear being the face of a unit with great expectations. But with zero experience behind Zaire’s own limited snap count, it’ll be a bit of a tight rope walk.

So let’s take our last looks at the quarterback position, always the most critical spot on the field.

 

QUARTERBACKS
Position Coach: Mike Sanford

 

DEPTH CHART

QB1: Malik Zaire, Jr.*
QB2: DeShone Kizer, Soph.*
QB3: Brandon Wimbush, Fr.
QB4: Montgomery VanGorder, Soph.*

*Denotes additional year of eligibility available. 

 

LEADING MAN

Malik Zaire. No kidding, right? Zaire now steps into focus, allowed to let his confidence and off-field leadership abilities mesh with the opportunity afforded to him. We’ve spent a few thousand words talking about Zaire this offseason. But I’ll be interested to see if they treat Zaire like Golson in 2012 or give him a full menu.

 

NEED A BIG SEASON

DeShone Kizer. In a perfect world, Kizer is the world’s most boring kick-holder. But in case of injury—or if Zaire’s helmet pops off—Kizer’s number is going to be called, and it’ll be up to the sophomore to be ready to take over.

Watching the spring game, it sure looked like there was an ocean between Kizer and being ready to take over the quarterbacking duties. But with Golson gone and Kizer having a great offseason (I’ll choose to believe what Brian Kelly and Mike Sanford have said about him) and fall camp, there’s nobody this staff wants more as No. 2, especially with the preference to keep a redshirt on Wimbush.

 

THREE BIGGEST FACTORS… 

Can Zaire keep the turnovers under control? There’s nothing more important to Notre Dame’s offense than limiting game-changing mistakes. So finding a way to run this offense in both an explosive way, but also one that limits potential mistakes, will be one of the critical balancing acts of the season.

There is too much talent on this offense to be overly vanilla. But all the talent in the world won’t help you win if you’re giving the football away. This is one of the largest big-picture questions I have for this season.

 

Can Zaire be a weapon in the running game… without getting hurt? Zaire is an elite option quarterback, based on a high school career that was almost exclusively triple-option until his senior season’s offense opened up. And add to that a rugged 230-pound frame that might make Zaire the most powerful runner in the stable, and you’ve got to wonder how the quarterback can be both a critical piece of the ground game, while also not getting hurt.

Early in Kelly’s time in South Bend, he seemed to put restrictions on Dayne Crist, knowing full well that he had nothing behind him. It didn’t matter, with Crist going down twice with season-ending (and career detouring) injuries. I expect Kelly has learned from that.

No, it’s not realistic for Zaire to run 22 times a game like he did against LSU. But finding a way to let Zaire impact the game on the ground while also limiting his “pitch count” makes sense.

 

What happens if things go wrong? Last season was ruined when Golson couldn’t pick himself up and revive his confidence. Zaire doesn’t look like he’ll have that problem, but it’s impossible to know how he’ll respond until he makes his first big mistake.

Building on this, things going wrong could also include losing the team’s starting quarterback. It’s a scenario that this staff has to be ready for, and if that happens, they need to be ready to not just take the redshirt off of Wimbush, but to potentially build him a package of plays that utilize his speed and big arm. This team is too good not to go all-in on salvaging the offense.

 

THREE RANDOM THOUGHTS

Does this offense need a game manager? Zaire is hardly a “game-manager” type, but is that what the Irish need?

I don’t think so, only because the Irish defense isn’t like the unit Notre Dame trotted out in 2012. But on a scale from “no-risks to full-throttle,” you’ve got to expect this staff to hand Zaire the reins slowly, keeping things as vanilla as they can until they need to outscore teams like Georgia Tech, Clemson and USC.

 

What will Mike Sanford’s impact on this position be? In Matt LaFleur’s single season in South Bend, he didn’t accomplish many of the things optimists expected, especially when it was clear that Golson was regressing down the stretch.

Sanford is a more polished offensive coach than LaFleur, who found himself a much better fit in the pro grame. And Kelly also likely looked hard at his arrangement last time around, where LaFleur focused on the guys behind Golson while the head coach seemed to work exclusively with the starter. Sanford wasn’t coming to South Bend to take a secondary role in this offense, especially after Urban Meyer offered him the keys to the Buckeyes offense.

But what changes should we expect at quarterback? We saw small tweaks—especially in the footwork in the zone read game—this spring. But expect Sanford’s DNA to be all over this offense (especially at quarterback), even as we wait to figure out how the offensive collaboration will work.

 

Can Zaire make progress in the red zone, especially near the goal line? While the Irish actually made great strides in converting opportunities to touchdowns (the Irish jumped from 100th to 45th in TD%), there’s still work to be done. And while Zaire’s decision-making in the passing game is still up for debate, his ability to run the ball near the goal line has to be a huge asset.

Stack the box and you leave guys like Will Fuller, Corey Robinson or Tight End X/Y/Z in single coverage. Respect the passing game and you’ve got a 230-pound quarterback barreling your way.

Even if we expect the special teams operation to get better, it’s still never good to rely on a freshman to get you three when you really want seven. The Irish can bury a lot of opponents by being opportunistic in the red zone, allowing Brian VanGorder’s defense to pin its ears back when an opponent gets down two scores. So cashing in on red zone opportunities is a key piece of the puzzle.