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Notre Dame 99-to-2: No. 83 Chase Claypool, receiver

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Listed Measurements: 6-foot-4 ½, 224 pounds
2017-18 year, eligibility: Sophomore with three seasons of eligibility remaining including the 2017 season
Depth chart: Claypool shot up the depth chart to be the No. 1 slot, or Z, receiver this spring, partly due to new offensive coordinator Chip Long’s preference for bigger targets and partly due to speculation surrounding sophomore Kevin Stepherson. Junior C.J. Sanders and Stepherson back up Claypool, with incoming freshman Michael Young likely to join their ranks.
Recruiting: A consensus four-star recruit, the intriguing Canadian chose Notre Dame over offers from Michigan, Oregon and Arizona, among others.

CAREER TO DATE
Claypool’s first impact came on special teams, making two tackles against Nevada in 2016’s second week. He remained a constant contributor on coverage units, finishing the season with 11 tackles, making appearances in all 12 games.

He also recorded a nine-yard run against Nevada, his only rush of the season. Of course, though, Claypool’s biggest, and most pertinent to his future, impact came in the passing game. He made five catches for 81 yards spread, including a 33-yard reception against Michigan State.

QUOTE(S)
Claypool quickly went from raw high school senior to contributing college player. The good news was he did indeed contribute. The not-so-good news was Claypool still had a lot of fundamentals to work on. Irish coach Brian Kelly said those have come along for Claypool over the last few months.

“It’s been a learning experience for him,” Kelly said with only a few weeks of spring practice remaining. “We threw him right into the fire last year, and he was swimming. He’s such a great kid. …

“Clearly, [Claypool] has definitely benefited from being here over the year and is more consistent.”

With the Irish depth at receiver and Claypool’s success embracing the physical nature of special teams last year, some wondered if he could switch to the defensive side of the ball and perhaps fill a hole at safety or linebacker. Kelly shot that thought down as soon as he heard it.

“We feel like we need his play on offense,” Kelly said. “He’ll continue to contribute on the special teams end of things, but we need his play on offense.”

Instead, Kelly intends to use Claypool’s physicality in an unexpected area at the slot receiver.

“Now he’s not a prototypical inside receiver, but there are some things where as a blocker, as a guy that can come over the middle, there aren’t many teams that can match the size and physicality of that kid,” Kelly said the week of spring practice’s end. “Does that mean he’s on the field for every snap? No, there are some things where we would move him out and put somebody else in there.”

WHAT KEITH ARNOLD PROJECTED A YEAR AGO
Maybe I’m crazy, but I’d love Claypool to spend the summer cross-training on both sides of the ball. It’s not unheard of for a long and lean guy like Claypool to gain 15 pounds over three months, and if he does that he’ll be close to 235 pounds, enough weight to come off the edge and chase the passer.

“Of course, I did watch his highlight video. This is a kid who averaged more than 49 points a game on the basketball court and comes to South Bend a very moldable piece of clay. (No pun intended.)

“Getting on the field as a freshman shouldn’t be the most important piece of the development puzzle here. But if there’s a chance to make an impact early, it shouldn’t stop him. …

“Then again, wide receiver isn’t the deep spot on the roster that it was last season. And contributing as a freshman isn’t necessarily as far-fetched as it was the past few years. It won’t take long to see how Claypool’s talent translates to the next level. If he’s ready to take the leap forward, this coaching staff will find a way to maximize his abilities – at any positon.”

2017 OUTLOOK
First of all, two notes to Keith: You are crazy, but your wait-and-see projection for Claypool was not. (Handing the keys to this space to who you did, however, remains highly questionable.) And, don’t think for a second your pun unintended disclaimer fooled anyone.

Now then, to Claypool. Long’s predilection to larger receivers fits in line with his tendencies to utilize two tight ends. In some alternate universe, Long has not arrived at Notre Dame and Claypool’s career could have an entirely different direction.

Sending Claypool’s frame on quick routes across the middle should provide junior quarterback Brandon Wimbush an especially-dynamic safety valve of sorts. Typically the last read is a running back in the flat or a tight end on a delayed release. That is not to say Claypool will be the last read – he won’t be. It is to say envisioning him running a five-yard slant from the slot position is to foresee a can’t-miss target only a few yards away from the quarterback.

The slot obviously does other things, and Claypool will do them. The point here is to illustrate some of why Long may want to try such height and length at a position usually reserved for shifty converted running backs.

This season’s ceiling for Claypool may be about 30 catches and a couple scores. If, however, the more proven Sanders and/or Stepherson emerge as the primary slot receiver, then Claypool could be looking at half those totals, thought that would be nothing to scoff at for a developing second-year contribution.

DOWN THE ROAD
Claypool’s success and fit in Long’s scheme in 2017 should quickly determine how his time at Notre Dame plays out. If Claypool’s size does as Long hopes, then his status as the top slot receiver in 2018 and 2019 would seem assured, and the numbers should only grow with experience and development.

If, however, the Irish switch to a more prototypical slot receiver, then the discussion about moving Claypool to defense will begin anew. As Keith’s outlook a year ago said, that is not exactly an outlandish idea. If Claypool’s career follows that of former Irish linebacker James Onwualu’s, that would be far from a disappointment of any kind.


2017’s Notre Dame 99-to-2
Friday at 4: Goodbye A-to-Z, hello 99-to-2 (May 12)
No. 99: Jerry Tillery, defensive tackle
No. 98: Andrew Trumbetti, defensive end
No. 97: Micah Dew-Treadway, defensive tackle
No. 96: Pete Mokwuah, defensive tackle
No. 95 (theoretically): Darnell Ewell, defensive tackle
No. 94 (theoretically): Kurt Hinish, defensive tackle
No. 93: Jay Hayes, defensive end
No. 92 (theoretically): Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa, defensive tackle
No. 91: Ade Ogundeji, defensive end
No. 90 (theoretically): Cole Kmet, tight end
No. 89: Brock Wright, tight end
No. 88: Javon McKinley, receiver
No. 87 (theoretically): Jafar Armstrong, receiver
No. 86: Alizé Mack, tight end
No. 85: Tyler Newsome, punter
No. 84 (theoretically): Michael Young, receiver