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Monday Morning Leftovers: Notre Dame should punt less, a Georgia ticket arrest & Bob Diaco’s fate

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Notre Dame and Boston College combined to punt 15 times this weekend and the Irish never attempted a field goal, while the Eagles attempted and made two. At least two other possessions could have ended with boots of some variety, though it could easily be argued fewer should have.

This space will never adapt the “don’t kick” ethos advised by analytics. The math makes sense and the approach theoretically pays off in the long-run, but it is simply not going to come to be practiced, so arguing for it wholesale is nothing but a waste of time and keystrokes. Football coaches cannot afford to think about the long-run in an era when one poor season leads to billboards calling for firings. More on Mike Riley’s future below.

This space will, however, advocate going for a fourth-and-five from the opponent’s 35-yard line as Notre Dame did in Saturday’s second quarter. Yes, coverage forced junior quarterback Brandon Wimbush to scramble for the needed gain, falling one yard short and handing possession to the Eagles. But when a game stands 10-7 long before halftime, looking toward the higher ceiling is simply smart maneuvering.

On the flipside, and this should be remembered moving forward, that decision may have also been a reflection on junior kicker Justin Yoon’s leg, or at least how the Irish coaching staff feels about his leg. From the 35-yard line, a field goal would have been a 53-yard* attempt. Yoon’s career long is 52 yards with room to spare, but that was two years ago.

The odds are, this particular fourth-down decision was made with an aggressor’s mindset, not out of doubts about Yoon’s maximum length.

If that was indeed the case, good for Notre Dame and Brian Kelly. Boston College could have used that approach — the Eagles punted four different times from the Irish side of midfield, going for fourth downs only on a fourth-and-inches at the 30-yard line and on a fourth-and-goal after desperation had set in.

Here’s to fewer punts, fewer field goals and more make-it-or-take-it fourth downs.

*Traditionally, a field goal attempt’s length is the line of scrimmage plus 17 yards: 10 accounting for the end zone and seven more for the distance behind the line of scrimmage where the holder spots the ball. In recent years, that latter number has grown to eight on longer kicks, allowing the kicker the ability to get the ball over the defensive line’s outstretched hands while also utilizing a lower kick angle, theoretically elongating the kick’s reach.

For example, Yoon kicked a 42-yard field goal in the second quarter against Georgia. The line of scrimmage before that kick was the 24-yard line.

One more note on Georgia and ticket sales, or lack thereof
Round-trip, non-stop flight from Atlanta to South Bend: $500 per person, give or take.
Hotel room within 30 miles of Notre Dame on a home game weekend: $300 per night, $600 total.
Tickets to see Georgia beat the Irish: Another $500 each, give or take.
Total for a party of two: $2,600, but that doesn’t mean the tickets will actually show up.

Such a fate befell hundreds of Bulldogs fans last week. No matter how any Notre Dame fans may have felt about the thousands of Georgia fans in the stands, they can certainly sympathize with the misery of a ticket broker reneging on his promised tickets.

In this instance, apparently some justice has been served. The Putnam County Sheriff down in Georgia arrested Jeff Cook for selling sports tickets without a license and advertising sports tickets for sale without posting a license number.

Per the local NBC-affiliate, the sheriff was well aware of Cook’s business and was largely okay with it until he failed to deliver on promised tickets to so many fans.

The Bob Diaco watch has become the Mike Riley ticking clock.
Nebraska defensive coordinator Bob Diaco, thee of former Irish stardom, may have felt the heat after giving up 78 points in the season’s first two weeks, his first two games with the Cornhuskers.

This past weekend, Diaco’s defense allowed only seven points, but his job may now be in more jeopardy than ever. (The Huskies returned two interceptions for touchdowns.) That is, with the 17-21 loss to Northern Illinois, Nebraska head coach Mike Riley’s job appears tenuous, at best, in only his third season in Lincoln.

How tenuous? It is never a promising sign when your boss says something to this effect.

Continuing the offensive line vs. defensive line theory
Exactly a week ago, this piece posited, “defensive lines beat offensive lines of equal talent in college football.” Continuing with that thought process, this Ringer piece on the NFL’s league-wide struggles on offense delves into the trend, though arguing there simply may not be equal talent any longer.

“The lack of game-ready offensive linemen coming through the draft remains a real issue teams must deal with, especially with a parallel surge of highly athletic defensive linemen.”

Whether agreeing or not, the premise is one to keep in mind while watching football this season and the next few to come.

So, Wake Forest might be, uhhh, good. [Insert question marks here]
The Demon Deacons had no trouble with Boston College a week ago, dispatching the Eagles 34-10. Hosting Utah State this weekend, Wake Forest again cruised, this time to the tune of 46-10. Admittedly, this year’s Aggies are not the frustrating opponent they have been in recent past, but they are still a better-than-average Group of Five team. In the recent past, the Deacons have been a much worse-than-average Power Five team.

That would normally be an at least somewhat competitive dynamic. This wasn’t, even aside from the score. Wake Forest outgained Utah State 588 yards to 267, holding the Aggies to 1.4 yards per rush and forcing 10 punts.

This week the Deacons travel to Appalachian State. If you know anyone who might have predicted Wake Forest would fall short of 5.5 wins before the season, perhaps advise that scribe to consider whether the Deacons can beat the Mountaineers by more than a field goal Saturday.

What in the Jayhawk is that offensive line?
Ohio didn’t even consider bringing extra rushers on this snafu.

Around Kansas football, that really may be situation normal …

Third-down conversions
It bears repeating: Notre Dame was 3-of-9 on third downs at halftime at Boston College, then leading only 14-10.

The Irish converted 6-of-9 third downs in the second half on their way to the 49-20 win.

Illegal kicks are enforced similarly to illegal batting of the ball.
This unique clip started making the rounds Saturday night. Athletically, it is quite impressive. By the rules, though, it is not allowed.

Per two referees who dabble as drinking buddies, that would have been called an illegal kick, leading to a 10-yard penalty and a loss of down.

Every so often a player intentionally knocks a ball out of the back of the end zone or forward toward another player. There is always a debate about the actual intention. If deemed purposeful, it is an illegal bat. An illegal kick is similar in all manners except it is done, you know, with a foot.

Lastly, when is it going to be publicly acceptable for all of us to start sporting mullets a la Oklahoma State head coach Mike Gundy? The Cowboys are that good — it may be time for us all to emulate that man.

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