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Friday at 4: When applauding Notre Dame’s opponent is appropriate

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It took me four years to watch every episode of “Cheers.” Late at night, wanting background noise while turning notes into coherent sentences, the banter filled the silence at an appropriate rate. The few laughs every 22 minutes were a bonus. Once Sam Malone turned off the lights at the bar for the last time, it was only natural to continue with “Frasier.”

An episode late in season four played on a screen to my side while compiling the needed scores, stats and spreads for this week’s Notre Dame’s Opponents entry. I barely heard Frasier’s son, Frederick, explain he had long known his dad wasn’t perfect.

“You couldn’t fix my computer. You thought Venus was the North Star, and I’ve seen you run.” Frederick told Frasier before explaining why he had never pointed out these deficiencies. “I thought it might hurt your self-esteem.”

I have never worried about those feelings with my father. His shortcomings are too apparent to pretend not to notice. He finishes off the tray of potatoes at dinner without asking if anyone else wants them, before they have made so much as one trip around the table. Calling his handwriting illegible is an insult to any three-year-old who ever picked up chalk.

And, he’s a Boston Red Sox fan.

Despite that terrible mistake, my father still always gave a nod to New York Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter as someone he could tolerate. More than that, he outright respected Yankees closer Mariano Rivera. Greatness like that should not be clouded by rivalry, no matter how many times Rivera and the Yankees shut the door on the Red Sox.

The same can and should be applied in any sport. Make no mistake, Rivera is the extreme of a fandom’s struggle. He was such a class act while throwing the single-greatest pitch in baseball history, a Red Sox (or Braves or Mets or Phillies) fan could hate how effective he was, but not the player himself. Watching Mariano required a touch of admiration.

By no means are any of the following examples anywhere near Rivera’s caliber. He may be on his own in that right. (After all, more men have walked on the moon than knocked in an earned postseason run against Rivera.)

So early in his career, perhaps Wake Forest junior receiver Greg Dortch should be considered near the other end of this thought process, but Notre Dame fans should watch Dortch tomorrow and expect to marvel at what he can do on a football field, even as he keeps the score a bit closer than they may like. If not rationally capable of that, then perhaps table the appreciation for afterward and provided an Irish victory, return to some of Dortch’s dashes down the field. He is electric with the football in a way not seen often enough. Then again, it is its rarity that makes it so worthwhile.

Dortch has touched the football 45 times in three games this year. He has gained 674 yards. At some point, he will beat Notre Dame’s secondary. Separate the effect on the game from the actual ability for just a moment, and recognize how unfathomably quick Dortch is.

In a year, expect to experience something similar when Boston College visits South Bend in late November. Sophomore running back AJ Dillon may already be the best running back in the country. With another year, he could be approaching the platonic ideal of college football.

It will be tougher to appreciate Dillon than it should be with Dortch, though. The Eagles will be a better team than the Deacons are. Given last week’s result, Boston College already is. Unless a player is as peerless as the Great Mariano — who holds the record for throwing the last pitch in the most World Series. How many did he do so? Answer at bottom. — some ill will remains as they succeed at your team’s expense. Despite Dortch’s best efforts, Notre Dame should still win this weekend, just not by as much as if he was out with another injury. Topping Boston College in 14 months will not be as certain.

That is part of the formula to appreciating individual opponents in college football. An excellent player on a defeated foe is more palatable to reminisce over thanks to the eventual victory. The win makes the remembered frustration feel deserved afterward.

It is why names like Boston College linebacker Luke Kuechly, Georgia Tech receiver Calvin Johnson and Pittsburgh receiver Larry Fitzgerald are remembered with nothing but fondness. Combined, they went 0-6 against Notre Dame.

In an informal survey of a dozen Irish fans this week asking what past opposing players they had most enjoyed to watch, those names were mentioned frequently, but combined they did not outpace USC running back Reggie Bush. The praises uttered for the Heisman-returnee all included caveats. Those disclaimers did not tie to any of the Trojans’ vacated wins or issues with the NCAA. They boiled down to one thing: USC went 3-0 against Notre Dame during Bush’s time there.

Dortch has not played the Irish. A life-threatening intestinal injury sidelined him last year. He may well end his career 1-0 against Notre Dame, but that is not reason enough to not take a moment Saturday afternoon and mutter some four-letter words under your breath out of respect, appreciation and admiration.

Even my father mustered that much for Mariano after he threw three scoreless innings in game seven of the 2003 ALCS to keep the Red Sox at bay for another year. His handwriting remains terrible and Thanksgiving potatoes are a 50/50 proposition for the rest of us, but he at least got that acknowledgment right.

(Five. Mariano threw the last pitch in five World Series, which includes the 2001 defeat.)