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Notre Dame 99-to-2: No. 12 Ian Book, junior quarterback

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Listed Measurements: 6-foot-1/8, 200 pounds
2018-19 year, eligibility: A junior academically, Book has three years of eligibility remaining, including the 2018 season.
Depth chart: Book will back up senior Brandon Wimbush this fall, deemed “1B” by Irish head coach Brian Kelly after the spring-concluding Blue-Gold Game. Book is entrenched enough in the position to lead to sophomore Avery Davis working at running back and receiver, but he will obviously now have to hold off the challenge of incoming freshman Phil Jurkovec.
Recruiting: Book’s recruitment was led by former Notre Dame quarterbacks coach Mike Sanford, having pursued the California-product while at Boise State before joining Kelly’s staff. A consensus three-star prospect and the No. 15 pro-style quarterback in the country, per rivals.com, Book originally committed to Washington State before reconsidering.

CAREER TO DATE
Book preserved a year of eligibility as a freshman in 2016 and then spent last season as the most popular player on any football team: the backup quarterback. Only a play away from running the Irish offense full-time, Book first saw genuine action in the blowout of Miami (OH) and his first real responsibilities came when Wimbush was sidelined at North Carolina with a foot injury. In his first career start, Book completed 17-of-31 passes for 146 yards and a touchdown against the Tar Heels while throwing two interceptions.

Of course, Book is best remembered for leading the comeback victory over No. 17 LSU in the Citrus Bowl, throwing for 164 yards on 14-of-19 passing with two touchdowns and one interception.

2017: 10 games, one start; 46-of-75 for 456 passing yards and four touchdowns with four interceptions; 207 rushing yards on 37 rushes.

QUOTE(S)
Book’s spring may have started a bit slow, certainly when compared to the dramatic ending of his season.

“Ian’s been a little bit spotty at times in the morning with some of his reads,” Kelly said at the end of March. “Sometimes that’s just focus and concentration on his part, but his feet are light. He’s throwing the ball well.”

Within a week, Book started performing closer to how Kelly had preferred.

“Ian has been, over the last couple of practices, much more consistent,” Kelly said. “The last time I was [addressing the media], I commented we wanted more consistency out of the quarterbacks. Ian has been much more consistent the last three practices, and that’s what we want from our quarterbacks, the ability to execute and work on a consistent basis.”

WHAT WAS PROJECTED A YEAR AGO
“Book will back up Wimbush. That also means, Book will play this season. By no means is that a prediction Wimbush will suffer an injury, though that is obviously possible. Rather, it is a prediction Kelly will get Book into a game the first chance he has, quite likely in the second half against Temple if the Notre Dame lead is cushion enough.

“Getting Book a few reps then, or perhaps two weeks later at Boston College, will help calm any nerves for when he may have to step in for Wimbush in a competitive situation. Perhaps Wimbush rolls an ankle a few minutes before halftime against North Carolina or maybe he takes a shot to the head against North Carolina State. Either scenario would force Book to move the offense forward without missing a step in what should be tight games.”

2018 OUTLOOK
Just as was said definitively a year ago, Book will play this season. While Kelly will want to get Jurkovec some in-game development, keeping Book at the ready will be a higher priority. The coaching staff will need to find the balance between Jurkovec’s development and the best competitive decisions for 2018.

There is a scenario where Jurkovec passes Book for primary backup duties, but that seems unlikely. Presuming that does not come to fruition, Book could be counted on in a make-or-break moment when Wimbush sprains an ankle against Stanford or loses his helmet at Virginia Tech. Those are not moments for a true freshman less than two months into his collegiate career. They are also not the time for Book to see his first action of 2018, no matter how much he played a year ago. Thus, some of the season’s first relaxed moments (looking at you, Ball State on Sept. 8) will land in Book’s hands for few series before turning to Jurkovec.

In the past, those blowouts focused solely on the backup quarterback getting reps. With the NCAA’s newfound generosity toward freshmen, a lopsided victory will also consider the true freshman looking to develop without losing eligibility. In a season where more than four blowouts is a wild pipe dream, those needs will come at the expense of each other, both statistically and practically.

DOWN THE ROAD
With Jurkovec arriving to raised banners, blown trumpets and elated crowds (Okay, that is an exaggeration.), Book’s chances at becoming the Irish starting quarterback narrowed. The best possibility requires Wimbush excelling this season while Jurkovec struggles with the college grind. That could lead to Wimbush heading to the NFL with a season of eligibility remaining and the Notre Dame coaches opting to develop Jurkovec for another season with more snaps as the backup rather than the eligibility-preserving freshman.

More likely, Wimbush plays well this year but does not scorch the Earth’s surface, bringing him back for 2019. At that point, with Jurkovec having two full years of prep, he would be stiff competition for Book to be the starting quarterback in 2020, Book’s last chance. With that in mind, a Wimbush return very well may precipitate a Book transfer.

Even if Wimbush does end up elsewhere in 2019, Jurkovec looms. Book showed last season he can lead the Irish in limited stretches, but he also threw an interception every 19 attempts and averaged only 6.08 yards per pass attempt. Those numbers will not produce a dynamic offense. Jurkovec’s ceiling should be higher than those figures. At least, that is why there are those proverbial banners, trumpets and crowds, right? (Yes, that is tongue in cheek.)

NOTRE DAME 99-to-2:
No. 99 Jerry Tillery, defensive tackle, senior
No. 98 Ja’Mion Franklin, defensive tackle, incoming freshman
No. 97 Micah Dew-Treadway, defensive tackle, senior
No. 95 Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa, defensive tackle, sophomore
No. 94 Darnell Ewell, defensive tackle, sophomore
No. 91 Ade Ogundeji, defensive end, junior
No. 89 Brock Wright, tight end, sophomore
No. 88 Javon McKinley, receiver, junior
No. 87 Michael Young, receiver, sophomore
No. 86 Alizé Mack, tight end, senior
No. 85 George Takacs, tight end, early-enrolled freshman
No. 85 Tyler Newsome, punter and captain, fifth-year senior
No. 84 Cole Kmet, tight end, sophomore
No. 83 Chase Claypool, receiver, junior
No. 82 Nic Weishar, tight end, fifth-year senior
No. 81 Miles Boykin, receiver, senior
No. 80 Micah Jones, receiver, early-enrolled freshman
No. 78 Tommy Kraemer, right guard, junior
No. 76 Dillan Gibbons, offensive lineman, sophomore
No. 75 Josh Lugg, offensive lineman, sophomore
No. 74 Liam Eichenberg, starting left tackle, junior
No. 72 Robert Hainsey, right tackle, sophomore
No. 71 Alex Bars, left guard and captain, fifth-year senior
No. 70 Luke Jones, offensive lineman, incoming freshman
No. 69 Aaron Banks, offensive tackle, sophomore
No. 68 Jarrett Patterson, offensive tackle, incoming freshman
No. 60 Cole Mabry, offensive tackle, incoming freshman
No. 57 Trevor Ruhland, offensive lineman, senior
No. 57 (theoretically) Jayson Ademilola, defensive tackle, incoming freshman
No. 56 John Dirksen, offensive lineman, incoming freshman
No. 55 Jonathan Bonner, defensive tackle, fifth-year senior
No. 54 John Shannon, long snapper, junior
No. 53 Khalid Kareem, defensive end, junior
No. 53 Sam Mustipher, center and captain, fifth-year senior
No. 52 Bo Bauer, linebacker, early-enrolled freshman
No. 47 Kofi Wardlow, defensive end, sophomore
No. 45 Jonathan Jones, linebacker, junior
No. 44 Jamir Jones, defensive end, junior
No. 42 Julian Okwara, defensive end, junior
No. 41 Kurt Hinish, defensive tackle, sophomore
No. 40 Drew White, linebacker, sophomore
No. 39 Jonathan Doerer, kickoff specialist, sophomore
No. 34 Jahmir Smith, running back, early-enrolled freshman
No. 33 Shayne Simon, linebacker, incoming freshman
No. 31 Jack Lamb, linebacker, early-enrolled freshman
No. 30 Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah, linebacker, sophomore
No. 29 Ovie Oghoufo, linebacker, early-enrolled freshman
No. 28 Nicco Fertitta, safety, senior
No. 27 Julian Love, cornerback, junior, second-team All-American
No. 25 Braden Lenzy, receiver, incoming freshman
No. 24 Tommy Tremble, tight end, incoming freshman
No. 24 Nick Coleman, defensive back, senior
No. 23 Drue Tranquill, linebacker, two-time captain, fifth-year senior
No. 22 Asmar Bilal, rover, senior
No. 21 Jalen Elliott, safety, junior
No. 20 Shaun Crawford, nickelback, senior
No. 20 C’Bo Flemister, running back, incoming freshman
No. 19 Justin Yoon, placekicker, senior
No. 19 Justin Ademilola, defensive end, incoming freshman
No. 18 Joe Wilkins, cornerback, incoming freshman
No. 17 Isaiah Robertson, safety-turned-rover, sophomore
No. 16 Noah Boykin, cornerback, incoming freshman
No. 15 D.J. Morgan, safety-turned-linebacker, junior
No. 15 Phil Jurkovec, quarterback, consensus four-star incoming freshman
No. 14 Devin Studstill, safety, junior
No. 13 Lawrence Keys, receiver, incoming freshman
No. 13 Paul Moala, local safety, incoming freshman
No. 12 DJ Brown, cornerback, incoming freshman

MEDICAL EXEMPTION
No. 35 David Adams, linebacker, sophomore

OUTGOING TRANSFER
No. 11 Freddy Canteen, receiver, outgoing transfer

Notre Dame 99-to-2: No. 15 Phil Jurkovec, consensus four-star quarterback, incoming freshman

rivals.com
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Listed Measurements: 6-foot-5, 200 pounds
2018-19 year, eligibility: Incoming freshman with four years of eligibility remaining, including the 2018 season.
Depth chart: Unless he fails to throw so much as one incompletion throughout all of preseason practice, Jurkovec should be expected to end up Notre Dame’s third quarterback this season, behind senior Brandon Wimbush as the starter and junior Ian Book filling the “1B” role, to use Irish head coach Brian Kelly’s springtime euphemism for backup quarterback.
Recruiting: A consensus four-star prospect and the No. 4 dual-threat quarterback in the class, per rivals.com, Jurkovec pledged to the Irish way back in May of his sophomore year, becoming the first commitment of the class. Offers from Ohio State, Alabama and Clemson never led to any wavering from the U.S. Army All-American.

QUOTE(S)
While Irish recruiting coordinator Brian Polian warned against deeming any recruits the heroes of the future, Kelly did not hesitate to voice hopes Jurkovec could compete for 2018’s starting role when Notre Dame received his national letter of intent during December’s early signing period.

“I want him to challenge,” Kelly said. “I want Brandon to feel competition, and I’m sure Brandon wants to be challenged. … I’m not doing a good enough job if I don’t bring in a great quarterback to challenge the incumbent quarterback. If that threatens Brandon, then he’s not the guy I think he is. I’m pretty certain he’s going to be excited about Phil being here and the competition.”

Even though he will be just a freshman, Jurkovec is unlikely to shrink from the competition or from the responsibilities expected of a quarterback. After all, he was a sophomore starter in high school. How he handled that role was a large part of what caught Kelly’s and Notre Dame’s attention.

“He wasn’t a sophomore that was held back,” Kelly said. “He was a young sophomore that was out there leading his football team against really good competition.

“That was something that we needed to go see — presence, leadership ability, you have to go see that in person. How he interacts with his teammates when he comes back on the sideline. To see that as a sophomore, it was important for us in this recruiting process of making decisions on quarterbacks. I needed to know more about his makeup and that gave us the first glimpse of who he was and what his makeup was.”

WHAT WAS SAID WHEN JURKOVEC’S NATIONAL LETTER OF INTENT ARRIVED
“Every description of Jurkovec may praise both his arm and his legs, but the lanky quarterback’s passing prowess is his greatest strength. His running game keeps defenses honest, furthering his ability to pick them apart over the top.

“Jurkovec’s high school career could not have been much better, but that does not mean he will be in the mix at quarterback from day one. It is more likely he spends his freshman year preserving eligibility and perhaps remains mired behind Wimbush through 2019.”

2018 OUTLOOK
The NCAA changed Jurkovec’s immediate future and erased the fine line Kelly would have needed to toe regarding Jurkovec’s 2018 playing time when the governing body granted freshmen four games of playing time before it impacted their eligibility. Kelly no longer needs to debate developing the touted quarterback in game situations; he can do it without pause in preferred situations.

Thus, fully expect the Irish offense to keep the gas pedal down against Ball State in the season’s second week through the third quarter, looking to build enough of a lead that Jurkovec can lead two or three series in the fourth without worry about the game’s fate. If a similar spot developed a week later against Vanderbilt, or perhaps in October vs. Pittsburgh or November with Syracuse, then Jurkovec could again lead multiple series with upperclassmen at his disposal against genuine Division I defenses. Such development without losing eligibility is literally unprecedented and is something most-obviously applicable to quarterbacks.

The odds are Jurkovec does not see a fifth game. If Wimbush is starting and Book ably backing him up, Notre Dame does not gain much by playing Jurkovec that often. Furthermore, five blowouts in the season would be a bit of a surprise.

Nonetheless, Jurkovec could end up with 300 passing yards and four total touchdowns, all while having four more seasons at his disposal if so desired.

DOWN THE ROAD
Wimbush may return to the Irish in 2019. He could also have such a strong 2018 he opts to head to the NFL while his stock is high. Or he could struggle, worry about further competition in the spring and take the graduate transfer route. All three scenarios are genuinely in play.

Obviously, one of those possibilities likely keeps Jurkovec in a supporting role next season, but it is exceptionally difficult to expect that to last any further. He will be Notre Dame’s starting quarterback in 2020, if not sooner, of course barring injury.

Jurkovec’s recruiting profile does not compare to the deified prospects of the ‘00s, but it may be the highest to arrive on campus since then. His career will thus certainly be compared to the stats of Brady Quinn and Jimmy Clausen. That will be unfair to Jurkovec. As Polian said, “Let’s be careful about who we are anointing the next stars. That puts pressure on 17-, 18-year-old kids. That’s not fair. … Sometimes it takes time, and we need to allow for that learning curve and that process before we start anointing guys as saviors.”

Jurkovec may not be a completely-polished quarterback when he first starts, but few are. He will have a long leash, though, simply due to his raw talents and unique athleticism.

NOTRE DAME 99-to-2:
No. 99 Jerry Tillery, defensive tackle, senior
No. 98 Ja’Mion Franklin, defensive tackle, incoming freshman
No. 97 Micah Dew-Treadway, defensive tackle, senior
No. 95 Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa, defensive tackle, sophomore
No. 94 Darnell Ewell, defensive tackle, sophomore
No. 91 Ade Ogundeji, defensive end, junior
No. 89 Brock Wright, tight end, sophomore
No. 88 Javon McKinley, receiver, junior
No. 87 Michael Young, receiver, sophomore
No. 86 Alizé Mack, tight end, senior
No. 85 George Takacs, tight end, early-enrolled freshman
No. 85 Tyler Newsome, punter and captain, fifth-year senior
No. 84 Cole Kmet, tight end, sophomore
No. 83 Chase Claypool, receiver, junior
No. 82 Nic Weishar, tight end, fifth-year senior
No. 81 Miles Boykin, receiver, senior
No. 80 Micah Jones, receiver, early-enrolled freshman
No. 78 Tommy Kraemer, right guard, junior
No. 76 Dillan Gibbons, offensive lineman, sophomore
No. 75 Josh Lugg, offensive lineman, sophomore
No. 74 Liam Eichenberg, starting left tackle, junior
No. 72 Robert Hainsey, right tackle, sophomore
No. 71 Alex Bars, left guard and captain, fifth-year senior
No. 70 Luke Jones, offensive lineman, incoming freshman
No. 69 Aaron Banks, offensive tackle, sophomore
No. 68 Jarrett Patterson, offensive tackle, incoming freshman
No. 60 Cole Mabry, offensive tackle, incoming freshman
No. 57 Trevor Ruhland, offensive lineman, senior
No. 57 (theoretically) Jayson Ademilola, defensive tackle, incoming freshman
No. 56 John Dirksen, offensive lineman, incoming freshman
No. 55 Jonathan Bonner, defensive tackle, fifth-year senior
No. 54 John Shannon, long snapper, junior
No. 53 Khalid Kareem, defensive end, junior
No. 53 Sam Mustipher, center and captain, fifth-year senior
No. 52 Bo Bauer, linebacker, early-enrolled freshman
No. 47 Kofi Wardlow, defensive end, sophomore
No. 45 Jonathan Jones, linebacker, junior
No. 44 Jamir Jones, defensive end, junior
No. 42 Julian Okwara, defensive end, junior
No. 41 Kurt Hinish, defensive tackle, sophomore
No. 40 Drew White, linebacker, sophomore
No. 39 Jonathan Doerer, kickoff specialist, sophomore
No. 34 Jahmir Smith, running back, early-enrolled freshman
No. 33 Shayne Simon, linebacker, incoming freshman
No. 31 Jack Lamb, linebacker, early-enrolled freshman
No. 30 Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah, linebacker, sophomore
No. 29 Ovie Oghoufo, linebacker, early-enrolled freshman
No. 28 Nicco Fertitta, safety, senior
No. 27 Julian Love, cornerback, junior, second-team All-American
No. 25 Braden Lenzy, receiver, incoming freshman
No. 24 Tommy Tremble, tight end, incoming freshman
No. 24 Nick Coleman, defensive back, senior
No. 23 Drue Tranquill, linebacker, two-time captain, fifth-year senior
No. 22 Asmar Bilal, rover, senior
No. 21 Jalen Elliott, safety, junior
No. 20 Shaun Crawford, nickelback, senior
No. 20 C’Bo Flemister, running back, incoming freshman
No. 19 Justin Yoon, placekicker, senior
No. 19 Justin Ademilola, defensive end, incoming freshman
No. 18 Joe Wilkins, cornerback, incoming freshman
No. 17 Isaiah Robertson, safety-turned-rover, sophomore
No. 16 Noah Boykin, cornerback, incoming freshman
No. 15 D.J. Morgan, safety-turned-linebacker, junior

MEDICAL EXEMPTION
No. 35 David Adams, linebacker, sophomore

OUTGOING TRANSFER
No. 11 Freddy Canteen, receiver, outgoing transfer

Notre Dame lands both a QB and a WR commit on Fourth of July

rivals.com
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If the Saturday ever comes Brendon Clark throws to Cam Hart for multiple touchdowns, their connection will trace to Independence Day 2018, when both consensus three-star prospects committed to Notre Dame.

Hart (Good Counsel High School; Olney, Md.) started things off Wednesday morning by choosing the Irish over Michigan State and Virginia Tech. Playing both receiver and defensive back in high school, Hart expects to focus on receiver duties in college, despite it not being his preference.

“I’m looking forward to playing right away,” he told rivals.com. “Receiver will be my main position right now because of how many defensive backs they already have. I’d personally like to play defensive back in college but we’ll see how things shake out. Receiver is my best option for playing time at Notre Dame.”

The Irish signed seven defensive backs in last year’s recruiting class and hold commitments from three more in this cycle, compared to four receivers in 2018 and now Hart in 2019. At 6-foot-3, his height would make more sense as a receiver, anyway. Combine that with a defender’s mentality embracing contact and Hart should develop into a solid possession receiver, perhaps working along the field sideline, a good role for a currently-raw prospect lacking true top-end speed.

Clark (Manchester H.S.; Midlothian, Va.) joined Hart in the afternoon, choosing Notre Dame over North Carolina and Clemson. His recruitment came as a direct result of the de-commitment of consensus four-star quarterback Cade McNamara (Damonte Ranch; Reno, Nev.) back in March. McNamara eventually committed to Michigan, and the Irish settled on Clark as their primary target, despite his pledge to Wake Forest.

A May offer from Notre Dame led to Clark reopening his recruitment, focusing on the Irish, Clemson and North Carolina. The No. 23 pro-style quarterback in his class, per rivals.com, Clark will join a complicated quarterback depth chart next fall.

Currently, senior Brandon Wimbush will start with junior Ian Book backing him up and incoming freshman Phil Jurkovec bringing the never-ending threat of potential, though significant playing time for the heralded recruit as a freshman remains unlikely. However, Wimbush has only two years of eligibility remaining, including 2018, and Jurkovec could be in line for the starting role whenever Wimbush leaves Notre Dame, conceivably as soon as after this season.

At that point, Clark would be immediately competing with Book for back up duties. Thus, this was a vital need for the Irish to fill.

Notre Dame now has 17 commitments in the class of 2019, widely expected to be a smaller recruiting class, granted the disclaimer of attrition can occur in the most unexpected of ways and in the most unanticipated times.

A competition in name only: Notre Dame’s ‘1A and 1B’ QBs, Wimbush and Book

Associated Press
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Ian Book understands the realities of football. Even though Notre Dame head coach Brian Kelly described the sophomore as “1B” in the starting quarterback competition, a complimentary version of calling him the backup, Book knows the 1B passer will not see the field regularly. Only the 1A, senior Brandon Wimbush, will.

“It’s just the nature of the game,” he said after last weekend’s Blue-Gold Game. “Only one quarterback can play, which we both know. We both came here to be the starting quarterback, so time will tell.

“No matter what happens, this competition is making us both better. It’s really been fun, just competing and pushing each other.”

The scrimmage concluding spring practice seemed to end the quarterback competition in reality, though Kelly will continue to describe it as a competition moving forward partly out of habit, minimally out of strategy and mostly to keep both quarterbacks motivated. Wimbush finished the exhibition with 341 yards and two touchdowns on 19-of-33 passing while Book threw for 292 yards and one touchdown on 17-of-30 passing. The two stat lines may not seem too dissimilar, but it should be remembered Wimbush was working against more of the starting defense than Book was.

Book’s stock may have been at its peak following the dramatic Citrus Bowl victory over No. 17 LSU, a comeback win which Book led.

“After the bowl game, it was a great way to get some momentum,” he said. “But still a lot of work to do and I think we, as an offense, feel pretty good.”

The one strong half against the Tigers did not prove Book to be the best quarterback on Notre Dame’s roster. It did prove, without a doubt — or an asterisk acknowledging how many injured players North Carolina had when Book started there in October — the Irish can win with Book taking the snaps. Kelly said as much the sentence before he described Book as 1B.

“We know Ian Book can win for us.”

Wimbush also won for Notre Dame last season, starting 12 games and managing eight wins outright. The Irish were still competitive with him against LSU, too, before Book took over a stagnant-to-that-point offense.

Whether or not he surpasses Wimbush this summer or preseason, Book knows what he needs to do to make that a conversation. He will never match Wimbush’s overall athleticism or raw arm strength. Book can, however, improve his understandings of collegiate defenses and steadiness in attacking them.

“Really focused on being able to identify coverages from defenses and just dive to that next step of taking film work to the next level,” he said. “… My focus is just being consistent. No ups and downs. Just being consistent and really being able to read the defense, making things as easy as I can on myself.”

Senior quarterback Brandon Wimbush. (Robert Franklin/South Bend Tribune via AP)

Meanwhile, Wimbush will be working on …
Yes, his accuracy and mechanics, but the returning starter has another facet to embrace. Kelly was pleased with Wimbush’s spring performance, especially the finale, but the completion percentage and coverage progressions were only a piece of what Kelly kept an eye on.

“I was much more interested in how [Wimbush] was going to handle pregame, how he’s been handling the game situations and getting his intensity up a little bit,” Kelly said. “He’s about as cool and calm as anybody.

“He needs that heartbeat to race a little bit more, and today he got it up a little bit. I thought it helped him in the way he plays. His intensity management was really good today and that was big for me.”

That may be Kelly’s want, but it is not necessarily Wimbush’s usual.

“I’m not that guy,” he said. “I can’t. I’m not going to fake it when I’m out there.

“… They want me to be like that, be more vocal, and I have been, but it’s nothing that everybody is going to see me and my face turning red, spitting out of my mouth. When I’m up there, I’m motivating the guys, motivating the receivers. Whether it’s in the huddle or lined up, I’ve worked on that.”

To interview Wimbush is to receive thought-out responses. When he describes the work he did with the trainers at 3DQB during spring break as “damn expensive,” it warrants a raised eyebrow only because he is not the Notre Dame player one might expect to publicly slip in a four-letter word, even one as PG as the one used. The idea of him approaching a huddle riding high on emotion and shouting above a crowd out of passion rather than function is a tough concept to fathom. That is not a criticism, simply an observation.

In a way, that calm demeanor may have an occasional benefit.

“I try my best to lead by example, and when the time permits, I do open my mouth and let my voice be heard,” he said. “I think the guys really listen when it is, because I don’t talk too much. I do need to start speaking more and getting on the guys more. I think they understand when I do.”

That is where the Irish quarterbacks are. Where will they be?
Incoming freshman Phil Jurkovec will join the quarterback competition this summer. For at least a week or two, Kelly will likely deem him some equivalent of “1C.” Whether that moniker is accurate, an understatement or an overstatement will depend on Jurkovec’s very first impressions in a college environment.

If Jurkovec is not in line to play in 2018, he will not even be the third quarterback on a non-existent three-deep depth chart. Notre Dame will still rely on sophomore Avery Davis for those emergency situations, even as Davis tries his hand at running back and receiver.

“He doesn’t want to give up his ability to play quarterback down the road,” Kelly said of Davis amidst his position switch.

Blue-Gold Game Leftovers: Notre Dame’s offensive ceiling is tantalizing, though also unlikely

Associated Press
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Immediately following the 2017 spring game, I walked by two much smarter, savvier and more veteran Notre Dame reporters on our way to post-game interviews. Our two minutes of exchange included them riffing on various hypothetical position changes that were eventually not seen come fall, including how much better of a guard than a tackle Tommy Kraemer could be. It should be noted, the junior began lining up at guard this spring.

My contribution to the conversation hinged entirely on repeating, “That offense just isn’t ready. It’s not close to ready.”

Of course, that assessment figured the spring game struggles were against a porous Irish defense, something freshly-arrived and since-departed defensive coordinator Mike Elko had already taken tangible steps toward fixing, far quicker than expected.

That evaluation also failed to recognize the potential of a running attack led by Josh Adams. Notre Dame knew it had a stalwart running back, and did not need to see more than eight carries for 39 yards and a touchdown from the lead back.

The point stood, though. The offense was not ready then or in November.

Driving away from this past Saturday’s Blue-Gold Game, the thought bouncing around my pickup’s two-seat cab was simple: This offense is unlikely to reach its ceiling, but if it did, it would be really, absurdly high-powered.

This time, that assessment offers some deference to first-year defensive coordinator Clark Lea’s ability to turn nine returning starters into another strong defense, perhaps superior to last year’s.

The praise of the offense must be hedged thanks to IF after IF after IF after IF. If senior quarterback Brandon Wimbush displays those mechanics and that accuracy against opposing defenses …
If senior running back Dexter Williams (pictured above) decides it is worthwhile to play, and play well, through pain …
If junior receiver Chase Claypool maintains the necessary emotional equilibrium …
If senior tight end Alizé Mack offers a consistent performance, even if not stellar, but stable …

In those four upperclassmen alone, the Irish have unique talents whom opposing defensive coordinators should lose sleep thinking about. They will determine how high this offense’s ceiling is, while the likes of senior receiver Miles Boykin, junior running back Tony Jones and sophomore tight end Cole Kmet will set the floor, along with what looks to be yet another overpowering offensive line (with Kraemer at right guard).

Obviously, the most-promising players always set the height of a vaulted the ceiling. As they perform against Michigan, Stanford and Virginia Tech will determine how the season ends. However, to pinpoint four like this is an extreme end of the spectrum.

Exiting last year’s Blue-Gold Game, it was clear Wimbush needed to learn much more of offensive coordinator Chip Long’s scheme. Aside from that, the only possible ways to increase the offense’s potency was to teach receiver Kevin Stepherson self-discipline and figure out why Mack could not make a gameday impact. The rest was essentially known, even if the running game’s potential was overlooked after the spring exhibition.

Entering this summer, the gap between the offense’s floor and its ceiling is a vast one. To have four question marks of this magnitude speaks to the possible volatility awaiting in the fall. Logically speaking, it is most likely two of the four above IFs become realities. In that case, it will be a good offense, but not the utterly threatening one conceivable. The odds are slim all four come to fruition, but crazier things have happened, especially when discussing the rapid development of 18- to 21-year-olds.

Without Adams following two All-American offensive linemen, this rendition of the Notre Dame offense may take a step backward, but the talent is there for it to actually improve, to carry the day if/when an experienced quarterback picks apart the defense (see: the Seminoles’ Deondre Francois).

That could not be said in 2017.

OTHER QUICK TAKEAWAYS FROM THE BLUE-GOLD GAME:
Much of this will be discussed in greater length in the coming two weeks, but …
— The interior of the offensive line — fifth-year left guard Alex Bars, fifth-year center Sam Mustipher and Kraemer at right guard — is quite a physically-imposing trio. Some defensive ends may find success against first-year starter and junior left tackle Liam Eichenberg, especially early in the season, but the inside trio should at least create massive holes for the Irish running game.

— Ideally Long can deploy Mack and Kmet together, but the spring performance of the latter certainly eases the concerns about the maturation and consistency of the former.

Notre Dame may need an unexpected influx of production from senior defensive tackle Jerry Tillery if the fifth-year tackle he is intended to line up alongside, Jonathan Bonner, does not recover fully from a wrist injury suffered in the beginning of 2017. (Robert Franklin/South Bend Tribune via AP)

— Notre Dame head coach Brian Kelly insists fifth-year defensive tackle Jonathan Bonner’s fitness will not be overly-effected by the wrist injury that kept him out of most of spring practice and all of the Blue-Gold Game.

“He’s been doing everything (in weight-lifting) but at lighter weight, and now he’s only a couple of weeks away from being full-go,” Kelly said Saturday. “He was already physically really gifted, so we don’t think that’s going to be a big curve for him, and he’ll be able to start training aggressively when we get back here in June.”

Consider this scribe skeptical. Not only is Kelly often overly-optimistic about injury effects and timetables, but to think missing six months of strength and conditioning will not be noticeable along the defensive interior is idealistic at best. Bonner’s 2017 emergence was a direct result of the arrival of strength and conditioning coordinator Matt Balis.

Without more of that work, the Irish will need to turn to sophomore Kurt Hinish for an increase in snaps, perhaps pushing toward 50 per game with Bonner offering 20-30 and senior Micah Dew-Treadway filling in the balance. Hinish appears to be up to the task, which is necessary, because classmate Darnell Ewell is not.