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Notre Dame 99-to-2: No. 52 Bo Bauer, four-star linebacker, early-enrolled freshman

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Listed Measurements: 6-foot-2 ¾, 216 pounds
2018-19 year, eligibility: Early-enrolled freshman with four years of eligibility remaining, including the 2018 season.
Depth chart: Bauer’s early arrival puts him in the mix for some reserve duties behind senior Te’von Coney. Junior Jonathan Jones is the presumptive backup to Coney, but Bauer’s ceiling is much higher than Jones’, meaning the former could make that jump this year, though that would be sooner than necessarily expected.
Recruiting: A rivals.com four-star recruit and No. 5 inside linebacker in the country, Bauer committed to Notre Dame way back in August of 2016, stymying any elaborate recruitment despite also holding offers from Michigan State, Penn State and Vanderbilt.

QUOTE(S)
Spring discussions are almost universally filled with praise and only praise. Occasionally an honest review will pop up regarding an early-enrolled freshman. In Bauer’s case, however, Irish head coach Brian Kelly still had only positive things to say.

“Bo Bauer has done a really nice job of getting his nose in there and making himself available,” Kelly said in late March. “When you talk about getting in there physically, that’s the tough part.”

As one of three freshman linebackers to enroll early, there were easy points to compare Bauer to. Whereas Jack Lamb and Ovie Oghoufo shined with their athleticism, they do not necessarily have the durability needed to contribute at linebacker as freshmen.

“Bauer probably combines both of those right now,” Kelly said. “His physicality is really good. He’s capable of probably playing right away. Of the three guys, he’s a little bit ahead of them.”

WHAT WAS SAID WHEN BAUER’S NATIONAL LETTER OF INTENT ARRIVED
“Bauer already has much of the physicality necessarily for the collegiate level, though he may not be as readily-athletic as fellow commit Shayne Simon, for example.

“… If [junior] Jonathan Jones … does not prove worthy of an influx of playing time, Bauer could quickly establish himself as a second-stringer seeing competitive action.”

2018 OUTLOOK
Bauer’s chances of playing as a freshman hinge on Jones’ progress. (It should be noted sophomores Drew White and David Adams were intentionally not mentioned in that thought; they were not omitted by forgetfulness.) If Jones proves worthy of 20-25 snaps each week, giving Coney plenty of a break to remain effective, then Bauer might be able to preserve a year of eligibility.

Yet, that may not be the best course of action, even if viable. Such a further discussion comes in the next section of this piece, but the immediate effect will be Bauer should see some time in 2018. For that to be in competitive moments, he will either have to earn such or Jones will have to fall short for another season.

At the least, getting Bauer a handful of snaps in a half dozen games will serve to get his feet wet, at least as much as can be expected when playing behind the likes of Coney. His abilities fitting gaps against the run will assure him of a few tackles.

DOWN THE ROAD
It is in Notre Dame’s best interests in the long-term for Bauer to play in the short-term because of the near-certainty he will be relied upon in 2019. With Coney gone, either Jones, Bauer or Lamb will be looked to as the starter in the middle of the defense. Whoever steps forward, Bauer will be a bigger piece than he should be in 2018.

Jones has not had much of a chance to date, playing behind Nyles Morgan and now Coney, but he has also failed to force the issue. Bauer stands to move past him at some point or another. The sooner it is, the better it bodes for his career as a whole, even if it is in tandem with Lamb. Such a duo is the byproduct of pulling in a linebacker group of four heralded as much as this quartet is, and the Irish will gladly balance Bauer and Lamb for the next few years.

NOTRE DAME 99-to-2:
No. 99 Jerry Tillery, defensive tackle, senior
No. 97 Micah Dew-Treadway, defensive tackle, senior
No. 95 Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa, defensive tackle, sophomore
No. 94 Darnell Ewell, defensive tackle, sophomore
No. 93 (theoretically) Ja’Mion Franklin, defensive tackle, incoming freshman
No. 91 Ade Ogundeji, defensive end, junior
No. 90 (theoretically) Tommy Tremble, tight end, incoming freshman
No. 89 Brock Wright, tight end, sophomore
No. 88 Javon McKinley, receiver, junior
No. 87 Michael Young, receiver, sophomore
No. 86 Alizé Mack, tight end, senior
No. 85 George Takacs, tight end, early-enrolled freshman
No. 85 Tyler Newsome, punter and captain, fifth-year senior
No. 84 Cole Kmet, tight end, sophomore
No. 83 Chase Claypool, receiver, junior
No. 82 Nic Weishar, tight end, fifth-year senior
No. 81 Miles Boykin, receiver, senior
No. 80 Micah Jones, receiver, early-enrolled freshman
No. 79 (theoretically) Cole Mabry, offensive tackle, incoming freshman
No. 78 Tommy Kraemer, right guard, junior
No. 77 (theoretically) Jarrett Patterson, offensive tackle, incoming freshman
No. 76 Dillan Gibbons, offensive lineman, sophomore
No. 75 Josh Lugg, offensive lineman, sophomore
No. 74 Liam Eichenberg, starting left tackle, junior
No. 73 (theoretically) Luke Jones, offensive lineman, incoming freshman
No. 72 Robert Hainsey, right tackle, sophomore
No. 71 Alex Bars, left guard and captain, fifth-year senior
No. 70 (theoretically) John Dirksen, offensive lineman, incoming freshman
No. 69 Aaron Banks, offensive tackle, sophomore
No. 57 Trevor Ruhland, offensive lineman, senior
No. 57 (theoretically), Jayson Ademilola, defensive tackle, incoming freshman
No. 55 Jonathan Bonner, defensive tackle, fifth-year senior
No. 54 John Shannon, long snapper, junior
No. 53 Khalid Kareem, defensive end, junior
No. 53 Sam Mustipher, center and captain, fifth-year senior
No. 11 Freddy Canteen, receiver, outgoing transfer

Monday’s Leftovers & Links: If Notre Dame is 33-to-1 for the title, what does that actually mean?

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It was a simple enough conversation with a sports fan, albeit a hockey nut who only occasionally devotes time to football and is staunchly against gambling. Engaged to a Notre Dame alum, the question was, do the Irish have an actual chance at winning the national championship this year?

Rather than respond with an inaccurate “No” or an imprecise “Yes,” the odds were offered.

“Well, Vegas has Notre Dame at 33-to-1,” I said from memory, pulling up the rest of the listings to offer a more thorough answer. “That’s tied with LSU and Michigan State, behind 12 other teams.”

To a casual football fan devoid of wagering knowledge, that nonsense was most useless of all. The improvised search for ground to stand on led to an entertaining rabbit hole of finding other 33-to-1 scenarios, providing them as parallels.

“Here, we’re in southern California, the Angels have 33-to-1 odds of winning the World Series, even with Shohei Ohtani likely out for the year.” Note: Ohtani’s injury is one of the most-disappointing sports stories of 2018, perhaps our current frontrunner. More pertinent note: The Angels are currently 4.5 games out of a playoff spot.

“The World Cup is coming up, and you know soccer better than I do,” a statement true of the majority of the world. “Croatia is listed at 33-to-1, just behind Uruguay at 28-to-1.” That tidbit actually resonated, casting the Irish as akin to a pipe dream. It also led to a discussion which resulted in one more fan for Belgium this World Cup cycle devoid of the United States. The Red Devils are far from a traditional power, is clad in argyle fashion and hails from a country known for producing some enjoyable beverages. What more could a fan want?

“What about the NFL? You follow that more closely, especially as a Dallas Cowboys fan.” We’ll abandon the ensuing direct quotes to preserve a PG-rating, but suffice it to say the receiver-less Cowboys, the quarterback-less Denver Broncos and the running back-less Oakland Raiders are all listed at 33-to-1 to win the Super Bowl this season.

Of course, being 2018, with gambling on the rise and politics always on the conversational horizon, it was also mentioned Oprah Winfrey is listed at 33-to-1 to win the 2020 presidential election.

All this gives better color and context to how sportsbooks see Notre Dame in 2018. It may be within reason the Irish win the national title, but it is considerably more unlikely than the simple numbers may make it seem.

It also serves as an entryway and excuse to now provide your weekly reading …

But before that, consider this a humble request for any mailbag questions that may provide the hook for next week’s “Leftovers & Links,” or perhaps even lead to a specific article. Send them to insidetheirish@gmail.com. Of course, entering them in the comments below is always an option, but those often get lost in time, if not also discussed in comment responses long before addressed with a headline.

Thanks in advance.

INSIDE THE IRISH READING:
Notre Dame lands a punter; adds (another) late kickoff
No. 69 Aaron Banks, offensive tackle
No. 57 Trevor Ruhland, offensive lineman
No. 57 Jayson Ademilola, defensive tackle, consensus four-star incoming freshman
No. 55 Jonathan Bonner, nose tackle
No. 54 John Shannon, long snapper
No. 53 Khalid Kareem, defensive end
No. 53 Sam Mustipher, center and captain

OUTSIDE READING:
Irish make the grade, but Brian Kelly hedges on Dexter Williams’ status for Notre Dame
Deon McIntosh set to transfer to East Mississippi junior college
Virginia Tech QB Josh Jackson’s future eligibility uncertain
Notre Dame WR C.J. Sanders transferring to SMU
Houston adds fifth Power Five grad transfer in Notre Dame’s Nick Watkins
Alabama punter Jay Bramblett commits to Notre Dame
What will it take for USC to be a powerhouse again ($)
C.J. Prosise is on the roster bubble in Seattle

Notre Dame 99-to-2: No. 53 Sam Mustipher, center and captain

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Listed Measurements: 6-foot-2 ½, 304 pounds
2018-19 year, eligibility: Fifth-year with only one season of eligibility remaining to be used in 2018.
Depth chart: Mustipher will start at center for the third straight year, and, as has been the case for most of that time, his backup is to be determined.
Recruiting: A consensus four-star recruit, Mustipher chose Notre Dame over the likes of Alabama, Michigan, Stanford and most other top-tier programs in the country. An Under Armour All-American, rivals.com rated him as the No. 3 prospect in Maryland, the No. 12 guard in the country and the No. 203 overall recruit.

CAREER TO DATE
Mustipher returns 25 starts to the Irish offensive line, all of them at center in the last two seasons. He first preserved a year of eligibility as a freshman before working as a reserve in nine games in 2015.

QUOTE(S)
Irish head coach Brian Kelly named Mustipher one of three initial captains the first day of spring practice, an honor easily predicted.

“He’s got grit,” Kelly said. “He’s got all the things off the field. Engineering student who has graduated, great student, great role model, represents Notre Dame football in the manner that you would want your student-athletes. He just has an immense amount of respect from his peers, coaches, players.”

Mustipher’s growth over the last four seasons, and in particular the last few as a starter, has not been limited to earning respect from the rest of the roster, though.

“It’s been his best [offseason], obviously,” Kelly said in late March. “In terms of his numbers, we had a full staff meeting with the strength staff on Tuesday and he’s in the top three in every category physically.”

Of course, the focus of Mustipher’s performance has little to do with his work in the weight room and only somewhat pertains to his leadership.

“There’s a lot of confidence when Sam is in,” offensive line coach Jeff Quinn said in mid-April. “He’s able to direct calls and make adjustments based on what defenses are doing. [The entire offensive line] trusts Sam without a doubt, as I do. Certainly his experience is pretty evident when we flip on the film. He’s always on his A-game with the calls and various different techniques that are applied based on the situations that present themselves. He hits those marks all the time. It’s just great to have somebody that has that kind of experience.”

WHAT WAS PROJECTED A YEAR AGO
“Mustipher will continue to be the fulcrum on the Irish line next season, as well. [Left tackle Mike] McGlinchey and most likely [left guard Quenton] Nelson will be off to the NFL, leaving Mustipher and presumably [guard Alex] Bars as established starters, plus whoever gets the final nod at right tackle.”

2018 OUTLOOK
Mustipher will likely become the vocal leader of the offense. As the most-established starter and an obvious choice as captain, he will do well in that role. When the going gets tough, his figurative and literal support will come from his immediate left side and fifth-year left guard Alex Bars, also a captain. The two have worked together, usually alongside each other, for five years now.

The only question around Mustipher is what happens if he twists his ankle, let alone suffers a long-term injury. Quinn identified senior Trevor Ruhland, sophomore Dillan Gibbons, Bars and incoming freshman Luke Jones as possibilities at center. None of them are centers by trade yet, but then again neither was Mustipher when he arrived at Notre Dame. If Mustipher is out for a series or a quarter, Ruhland or Gibbons would likely fill in. If the prognosis were to sideline Mustipher longer than that, then perhaps Bars would move to center and someone else could emerge at guard.

Either way, Mustipher’s health is of paramount importance to the Irish offense’s success, arguably even more so than that of starting quarterback senior Brandon Wimbush.

DOWN THE ROAD
Mustipher’s technical ability has steadily improved throughout his collegiate career. Combined with some impressive strength, his progression makes him an intriguing draft prospect. Centers are not pursued as highly as other line positions, partly due to needing exactly half as many of them, but elite centers get noticed.

A three-year starter at Notre Dame, Mustipher’s draft fate may come down to his combine numbers as much as anything else, considering his film will almost certainly be outstanding.

NOTRE DAME 99-to-2:
No. 99 Jerry Tillery, defensive tackle, senior
No. 97 Micah Dew-Treadway, defensive tackle, senior
No. 95 Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa, defensive tackle, sophomore
No. 94 Darnell Ewell, defensive tackle, sophomore
No. 93 (theoretically) Ja’Mion Franklin, defensive tackle, incoming freshman
No. 91 Ade Ogundeji, defensive end, junior
No. 90 (theoretically) Tommy Tremble, tight end, incoming freshman
No. 89 Brock Wright, tight end, sophomore
No. 88 Javon McKinley, receiver, junior
No. 87 Michael Young, receiver, sophomore
No. 86 Alizé Mack, tight end, senior
No. 85 George Takacs, tight end, early-enrolled freshman
No. 85 Tyler Newsome, punter and captain, fifth-year senior
No. 84 Cole Kmet, tight end, sophomore
No. 83 Chase Claypool, receiver, junior
No. 82 Nic Weishar, tight end, fifth-year senior
No. 81 Miles Boykin, receiver, senior
No. 80 Micah Jones, receiver, early-enrolled freshman
No. 79 (theoretically) Cole Mabry, offensive tackle, incoming freshman
No. 78 Tommy Kraemer, right guard, junior
No. 77 (theoretically) Jarrett Patterson, offensive tackle, incoming freshman
No. 76 Dillan Gibbons, offensive lineman, sophomore
No. 75 Josh Lugg, offensive lineman, sophomore
No. 74 Liam Eichenberg, starting left tackle, junior
No. 73 (theoretically) Luke Jones, offensive lineman, incoming freshman
No. 72 Robert Hainsey, right tackle, sophomore
No. 71 Alex Bars, left guard and captain, fifth-year senior
No. 70 (theoretically) John Dirksen, offensive lineman, incoming freshman
No. 69 Aaron Banks, offensive tackle, sophomore
No. 57 Trevor Ruhland, offensive lineman, senior
No. 57 (theoretically), Jayson Ademilola, defensive tackle, incoming freshman
No. 55 Jonathan Bonner, defensive tackle, fifth-year senior
No. 54 John Shannon, long snapper, junior
No. 53 Khalid Kareem, defensive end, junior
No. 11 Freddy Canteen, receiver, outgoing transfer

Notre Dame 99-to-2: No. 53 Khalid Kareem, defensive end

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Listed Measurements: 6-foot-4, 270 pounds
2018-19 year, eligibility: Junior with two seasons of eligibility remaining, including 2018.
Depth chart: Kareem played well enough in the spring to apparently usurp fifth-year end Jay Hayes as the starter, leading in part to Hayes’ transfer to Georgia.
Recruiting: Kareem’s recruitment included commitments to Michigan State, Alabama and Notre Dame, in that order. A consensus four-star prospect and the No. 8 recruit in Michigan, per rivals.com, both Kareem and Alabama wanted to go separate ways, leading to the No. 237-ranked player in the country to enroll early at Notre Dame. He also held offers from Ohio State and Stanford.

CAREER TO DATE
Kareem rising to a starting role as a junior supports his playing in four games as a freshman, even though he recorded no statistics. Top-level defensive linemen rarely stay five years, so the Irish getting a few early snaps from an early-enrolled Kareem will probably have no long-term cost.

Last year, he split time with Hayes as a strong-side end, playing in all 13 games, highlighted by a pair of sacks against USC.

2016: Four games.
2017: 13 games; 21 tackles including 5.5 for loss with three sacks and one fumble recovery.

QUOTE(S)
Upon Hayes’ transfer halfway through spring practices, Notre Dame head coach Brian Kelly made it clear: Kareem was the likely starter at strong-side end.

“We felt like [Kareem] had earned the starting position there based upon his work both in the weight room and on the football field,” Kelly said April 7. “He was going to be the starter at that position. We believe that based upon his production.”

That does not mean Kareem did not have room to improve. Hayes has a much bigger frame, occasionally considered for situational work at defensive tackle. That size made Hayes well-suited for the grind of setting the edge against the running game. Kareem is not yet necessarily ready for that wear-and-tear.

“For [Kareem], it’s workload,” Kelly said. “He’s got real good length. He has a knack for pass rushing, just has a knack of being there and getting to the quarterback. For him, the next step becomes how do we get him up to 60 plays. He was a 20-play guy for us.

“How do we get him up to 60? Fatigue, strength, all those things coming together. But he has some really innate ability to find the quarterback.”

WHAT WAS PROJECTED A YEAR AGO
“[Former Irish end Andrew] Trumbetti has shown the ability to contribute when healthy, and Jay Hayes impressed this spring. Switching to compete with [classmates] Daelin Hayes, Okwara and Ogundeji may remove the upperclassmen’s experience to compete with, but those three all present large amounts of potential. Someone will see a slim number of snaps this fall, and Kareem seems most likely to suffer that fate at this point.

“The fact of the matter, though, is the Notre Dame defensive line needs playmakers. If Kareem forces the issue, [former] defensive coordinator Mike Elko and defensive line coach Mike Elston will find him playing time, even if it means moving Kareem inside to supplement the shallow depths at tackle. That may be outside the box, but the Irish interior may need some innovative thinking.”

2018 OUTLOOK
Jay Hayes’ transfer puts some unexpected pressure on Kareem. If he does not excel as a starter, losing a veteran defensive lineman will stand out as a step backward that likely could have been avoided.

Kareem should be up for most of the duties, however. His presence will be most felt in the pass rush, just like it was last season. Ogundeji can offer some of that role, as well, so Kareem’s apparently-limited snap count may be relieved at times in pass-specific situations, letting Ogundeji use his speed and length in an uninhibited moment and keeping Kareem a bit fresher for those edge-setting challenges.

Kareem reaching 60 snaps each week would leave about 20 for Ogundeji. It would not be a terrible thing for that split to become less drastic, even if only to 55-25. Each snap Ogundeji can take off Kareem’s hands should increase the latter’s effectiveness. It would also indicate the Notre Dame defense has put opponents in desperate positions with some frequency.

All this is to say, Kareem should build on last year’s personal totals, but he will not single-handedly make up the loss of the 55 tackles, 7.5 for loss with 1.5 sacks provided last year by Trumbetti and Hayes. If Kareem were to finish 2018 with 50 tackles, it would be comparable to Isaac Rochell’s 2016, which put Rochell onto the NFL radar. He managed only one sack in that campaign, along with seven tackles for loss; Kareem should account for at least five sacks in his increased role, and it would not be a shock to see him lead the team in the category, despite the near-constant hype around Daelin Hayes.

DOWN THE ROAD
A 50-tackle, five-sack season as a junior could have Kareem pondering the NFL. That would be quite a leap, and one only likely pursued if the year actually includes 10-plus sacks. Provided that does not occur, Kareem is well-situated to be a focal piece of the 2019 defense.

With senior three-technique tackle Jerry Tillery and fifth-year nose tackle Jonathan Bonner both out of eligibility after this season, the defensive frontline leaders will become Kareem and Hayes. Whereas some of this fall’s defensive scheming will be to put Tillery in position to make plays, next season that impetus should tilt toward the athletic defensive ends.

A high-profile recruit who played well in big moments as a sophomore and then follows that up with a solid junior season should be able to excel as a senior with the spotlight on him.

NOTRE DAME 99-to-2:
No. 99 Jerry Tillery, defensive tackle, senior
No. 97 Micah Dew-Treadway, defensive tackle, senior
No. 95 Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa, defensive tackle, sophomore
No. 94 Darnell Ewell, defensive tackle, sophomore
No. 93 (theoretically) Ja’Mion Franklin, defensive tackle, incoming freshman
No. 91 Ade Ogundeji, defensive end, junior
No. 90 (theoretically) Tommy Tremble, tight end, incoming freshman
No. 89 Brock Wright, tight end, sophomore
No. 88 Javon McKinley, receiver, junior
No. 87 Michael Young, receiver, sophomore
No. 86 Alizé Mack, tight end, senior
No. 85 George Takacs, tight end, early-enrolled freshman
No. 85 Tyler Newsome, punter and captain, fifth-year senior
No. 84 Cole Kmet, tight end, sophomore
No. 83 Chase Claypool, receiver, junior
No. 82 Nic Weishar, tight end, fifth-year senior
No. 81 Miles Boykin, receiver, senior
No. 80 Micah Jones, receiver, early-enrolled freshman
No. 79 (theoretically) Cole Mabry, offensive tackle, incoming freshman
No. 78 Tommy Kraemer, right guard, junior
No. 77 (theoretically) Jarrett Patterson, offensive tackle, incoming freshman
No. 76 Dillan Gibbons, offensive lineman, sophomore
No. 75 Josh Lugg, offensive lineman, sophomore
No. 74 Liam Eichenberg, starting left tackle, junior
No. 73 (theoretically) Luke Jones, offensive lineman, incoming freshman
No. 72 Robert Hainsey, right tackle, sophomore
No. 71 Alex Bars, left guard and captain, fifth-year senior
No. 70 (theoretically) John Dirksen, offensive lineman, incoming freshman
No. 69 Aaron Banks, offensive tackle, sophomore
No. 57 Trevor Ruhland, offensive lineman, senior
No. 57 (theoretically), Jayson Ademilola, defensive tackle, incoming freshman
No. 55 Jonathan Bonner, defensive tackle, fifth-year senior
No. 54 John Shannon, long snapper, junior
No. 11 Freddy Canteen, receiver, outgoing transfer

Notre Dame 99-to-2: No. 54 John Shannon, long snapper

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Listed Measurements: 6-foot-2, 232 pounds
2018-19 year, eligibility: Junior with three seasons of eligibility remaining, including 2018.
Depth chart: Shannon will handle all long-snapping duties.
Recruiting: Rivals.com rated Shannon a two-star recruit, yet he was a U.S. Army All-American. Thus are the oddities of long-snapper prospecting. Among recruiting services who ranked long snappers by position, Shannon was considered the top in the country. He weighed offers from West Virginia and West Point, but chose to follow in the footsteps of his grandfather, a four-year starter for Notre Dame.

CAREER TO DATE
After preserving a year of eligibility in 2016, Shannon played in all 13 games last season, the only long snapper on the Irish roster then and now.

QUOTE(S)
Shannon has not come up in a public conversation since last spring practice, just how the coaching staff prefers its long snappers. To reiterate Shannon’s stature in recruiting, und.com still describes him as, “Widely considered the top long snapper in the 2015 recruiting class.”

WHAT WAS PROJECTED A YEAR AGO
“Let’s keep this simple: Now healthy and at the top of a depth chart of one, Shannon could have a heavy workload this fall if the Notre Dame offense scores at the rates offensive coordinator Chip Long certainly envisions. Then again, if it doesn’t, that simply means Shannon is firing more often to senior punter Tyler Newsome rather than junior kicker Justin Yoon.”

2018 OUTLOOK
It is not complicated. As long as Shannon remains healthy — and the only valid cause for concern there is a torn labrum he suffered his senior year of high school — he will handle this job. There were no snap issues in his debut season, so there is no reason to expect any moving forward.

DOWN THE ROAD
Shannon should end up a four-year starter for Notre Dame, the exact career the Irish coaching staff hoped for when it devoted a scholarship to eliminating the headaches sometimes stemming from snapping difficulties.

If anything, 2019 may be a year of adjustment for Shannon, his first season not snapping to current fifth-year punter Tyler Newsome. Finding chemistry from the outset with recently-committed Jay Bramblett (Tuscaloosa Hillcrest High School; Tuscaloosa, Ala.) could help ease in Newsome’s replacement.

NOTRE DAME 99-to-2:
No. 99 Jerry Tillery, defensive tackle, senior
No. 97 Micah Dew-Treadway, defensive tackle, senior
No. 95 Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa, defensive tackle, sophomore
No. 94 Darnell Ewell, defensive tackle, sophomore
No. 93 (theoretically) Ja’Mion Franklin, defensive tackle, incoming freshman
No. 91 Ade Ogundeji, defensive end, junior
No. 90 (theoretically) Tommy Tremble, tight end, incoming freshman
No. 89 Brock Wright, tight end, sophomore
No. 88 Javon McKinley, receiver, junior
No. 87 Michael Young, receiver, sophomore
No. 86 Alizé Mack, tight end, senior
No. 85 George Takacs, tight end, early-enrolled freshman
No. 85 Tyler Newsome, punter and captain, fifth-year senior
No. 84 Cole Kmet, tight end, sophomore
No. 83 Chase Claypool, receiver, junior
No. 82 Nic Weishar, tight end, fifth-year senior
No. 81 Miles Boykin, receiver, senior
No. 80 Micah Jones, receiver, early-enrolled freshman
No. 79 (theoretically) Cole Mabry, offensive tackle, incoming freshman
No. 78 Tommy Kraemer, right guard, junior
No. 77 (theoretically) Jarrett Patterson, offensive tackle, incoming freshman
No. 76 Dillan Gibbons, offensive lineman, sophomore
No. 75 Josh Lugg, offensive lineman, sophomore
No. 74 Liam Eichenberg, starting left tackle, junior
No. 73 (theoretically) Luke Jones, offensive lineman, incoming freshman
No. 72 Robert Hainsey, right tackle, sophomore
No. 71 Alex Bars, left guard and captain, fifth-year senior
No. 70 (theoretically) John Dirksen, offensive lineman, incoming freshman
No. 69 Aaron Banks, offensive tackle, sophomore
No. 57 Trevor Ruhland, offensive lineman, senior
No. 57 (theoretically), Jayson Ademilola, defensive tackle, incoming freshman
No. 55 Jonathan Bonner, defensive tackle, fifth-year senior
No. 11 Freddy Canteen, receiver, outgoing transfer